Demonstrations to take place across the UK calling for pay rise for NHS workers

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Occitanie
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https://amp.lbc.co.uk/news/uk/demons...mpression=true


NHS staff demand a 15% pay rise.


I don’t think many people are that that 1/3 of NHS staff were shielding during the pandemic, meaning that the other 2/3 had taken on their work load. This has been confirmed by a clinical director of 30 years who has had up to 25% of her workforce shielding during the pandemic, resulting in 25 more hours work per week.

She believes NHS staff shouldn’t see a “blanket” pay rise, but instead receive bonuses based on the work they have done - which I believe seems fairer on those who have gone above and beyond on the frontlines.



Thoughts?
Last edited by Occitanie; 2 weeks ago
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Occitanie)
https://amp.lbc.co.uk/news/uk/demons...mpression=true


NHS staff demand a 15% pay rise.


I don’t think many people are that that 1/3 of NHS staff were shielding during the pandemic, meaning that the other 2/3 had taken on their work load. This has been confirmed by a clinical director of 30 years who has had up to 25% of her workforce shielding during the pandemic, resulting in 25 more hours work per week.

She believes NHS staff shouldn’t see a “blanket” pay rise, but instead receive bonuses based on the work they have done - which I believe seems fairer on those who have gone above and beyond on the frontlines.



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The shielding people were helping the NHS, by not dying/ costing them money for potentially invasive treatments so as the majority of conditions on the shielding list aren't a persons fault then an all round pay rise and a bonus on top for those did work would be fair.
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Occitanie
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(Original post by claireestelle)
The shielding people were helping the NHS, by not dying/ costing them money for potentially invasive treatments so as the majority of conditions on the shielding list aren't a persons fault then an all round pay rise and a bonus on top for those did work would be fair.
A pay rise and a bonus?!

Of course, some of those shielding were working - usually behind a computer screen - but the vast majority were pretty much on holiday, and still are 6 months into the pandemic on 5, sometimes 6-figure pay.

I stand by what was said, there should be a bonus for all those who worked frontline not a pay rise for each and every NHS staff member.

Where is the fairness?!
Last edited by Occitanie; 2 weeks ago
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Occitanie)
A pay rise and a bonus?!

Of course, some of those shielding were working - usually behind a computer screen - but the vast majority were pretty much on holiday, and still are 6 months into the pandemic on 5, sometimes 6-figure pay.

I stand by what was said, there should be a bonus for all those who worked frontline.

Where is the fairness?!
I mean those that worked get a pay rise and a bonus. Those that couldn't work likely through no fault of their own and who were responsible in not getting seriously ill/dying shouldn't be written off having a pay rise and when I say that I mean the people who would usually be treating patients rather than high up managers who have very high pay anyway.
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Occitanie
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(Original post by claireestelle)
I mean those that worked get a pay rise and a bonus. Those that couldn't work likely through no fault of their own and who were responsible in not getting seriously ill/dying shouldn't be written off having a pay rise and when I say that I mean the people who would usually be treating patients rather than high up managers who have very high pay anyway.
I don’t think you understand.

Those shielding, regardless of their role in the NHS, were doing a maximum of 20% of their usual work - on FULL PAY. Whilst their colleagues were working overtime on normal pay.

Somehow that means everyone should get a pay rise, regardless.

In the meantime, unemployment is at an all-time high, people are struggling to find jobs as more money, that the country is already struggling
to find, is being pumped into a mismanaged and failing sector.

£30,000+ salaries (not even furloughed) for staying at home doing less than half of your workload.

There’s a bigger picture, and you’re failing to see it.
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Napp
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A pay rise? Sure. I think most will agree a fair whack of of the NHS staff are grossly underpaid for the work they do (bar the administrators that is) 15% though? More than a little steep. Not least considering the vast numbers of people who are about to lose their jobs and, incidentally, are the ones who pay the NHS staff salaries..
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Surnia
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But there are reports that there were NHS staff on the frontline who weren't that busy, and who's to say staff who couldn't work haven't put in the hours on other other occasions, like the Manchester and London bombings? Does everyone get the same bonus or is time going to be expended working out who did what so there's no quibbling over those who did more during the pandemic?

If it's for dealing with an infectious disease, there are staff who do that every day anyway.
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Kitten in boots
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(Original post by Occitanie)
https://amp.lbc.co.uk/news/uk/demons...mpression=true


NHS staff demand a 15% pay rise.


I don’t think many people are that that 1/3 of NHS staff were shielding during the pandemic, meaning that the other 2/3 had taken on their work load. This has been confirmed by a clinical director of 30 years who has had up to 25% of her workforce shielding during the pandemic, resulting in 25 more hours work per week.

She believes NHS staff shouldn’t see a “blanket” pay rise, but instead receive bonuses based on the work they have done - which I believe seems fairer on those who have gone above and beyond on the frontlines.



Thoughts?
Its not just about coronavirus.

Nurses have faced real term pay cuts over the last decade. Combined with The Conservatives wasteful, bureaucratic, and top down management of the NHS, it has seriously damaged staff morale and caused a recruitment/retention crisis.

The irony is NHS trusts are forced to cover staff shortages by paying through the nose for agency staff.
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DiddyDec
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Maybe if the NHS could spaff less money up the wall they could pay their staff a little more.
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L i b
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A 15 percent increase when they're within a pay deal period and the economy's gone to ****? Get out.

(Original post by Kitten in boots)
The irony is NHS trusts are forced to cover staff shortages by paying through the nose for agency staff.
There will always be some place for agency staff, but it's worth noting that the expenditure on them has declined significantly in recent years.
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Rakas21
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I’m with Lib, they have a contractual pay agreement which sees them given above inflationary pay rises. There is no justification for granting the, even more, especially before the end of the crisis.
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Underscore__
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(Original post by claireestelle)
The shielding people were helping the NHS, by not dying/ costing them money for potentially invasive treatments so as the majority of conditions on the shielding list aren't a persons fault then an all round pay rise and a bonus on top for those did work would be fair.
Well then I’ll be claiming my money for helping out by not dying or having any invasive treatments?

I don’t know what the total wage bill of the NHS is but I’d imagine it’s into the hundreds of millions if not billions, where do they suppose the government finds the money to pay everyone 15% more?
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imlikeahermit
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Im sure if they cut all the fat cats at the top they could afford that.
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Good bloke
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To advocate that one of the few groupd of people who are guaranteed to keep their jobs (many of whom are astonishingly well-paid anyway) get such an extraordinary pay rise, while subject to a pay agreement, and when huge numbers of others have or will soon lose theirs seems a tad thoughtless.The country's finances will be sufficiently stretched without doling out such largesse.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Underscore__)
Well then I’ll be claiming my money for helping out by not dying or having any invasive treatments?

I don’t know what the total wage bill of the NHS is but I’d imagine it’s into the hundreds of millions if not billions, where do they suppose the government finds the money to pay everyone 15% more?
The NHS wages bill is around £50 billion. Obviously, an extra 15% amounts to £7.5 billion, exclusive of NICs and pension contributions.
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Underscore__
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(Original post by Good bloke)
The NHS wages bill is around £50 billion. Obviously, an extra 15% amounts to £7.5 billion, exclusive of NICs and pension contributions.
Higher than I would have guessed
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Occitanie
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(Original post by Good bloke)
To advocate that one of the few groupd of people who are guaranteed to keep their jobs (many of whom are astonishingly well-paid anyway) get such an extraordinary pay rise, while subject to a pay agreement, and when huge numbers of others have or will soon lose theirs seems a tad thoughtless.The country's finances will be sufficiently stretched without doling out such largesse.
Spot on.

They'll get their pay rise regardless, though.
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Napp
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(Original post by Good bloke)
To advocate that one of the few groupd of people who are guaranteed to keep their jobs (many of whom are astonishingly well-paid anyway) get such an extraordinary pay rise, while subject to a pay agreement, and when huge numbers of others have or will soon lose theirs seems a tad thoughtless.The country's finances will be sufficiently stretched without doling out such largesse.
In fairness, whilst i agree with the general point i feel this ones a bit wide of the mark. The vast majority of NHS workers earning peanuts - or at least not that much. Consultants hardly being representative compared to nurses, cleaners et al.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Napp)
In fairness, whilst i agree with the general point i feel this ones a bit wide of the mark. The vast majority of NHS workers earning peanuts - or at least not that much. Consultants hardly being representative compared to nurses, cleaners et al.
My daughter-in-law is a juniuor doctor, still training, and she has been earning a six figure income for the last three years.
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AW_1983
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(Original post by Occitanie)
https://amp.lbc.co.uk/news/uk/demons...mpression=true


NHS staff demand a 15% pay rise.


I don’t think many people are that that 1/3 of NHS staff were shielding during the pandemic, meaning that the other 2/3 had taken on their work load. This has been confirmed by a clinical director of 30 years who has had up to 25% of her workforce shielding during the pandemic, resulting in 25 more hours work per week.

She believes NHS staff shouldn’t see a “blanket” pay rise, but instead receive bonuses based on the work they have done - which I believe seems fairer on those who have gone above and beyond on the frontlines.



Thoughts?
Difficult one this. One of the less talked about problems with the NHS is that older employees get a far better package overall than their younger colleagues because of pension changes. The extremely generous final salary schemes with a retirement at 60 that we'll still be paying for over at least the next four decades has been replaced with the rather more miserly average salary scheme with a retirement age that matches the state pension age (67 and rising for those under around 40). To add insult to injury, the amounts employees must contribute to this new scheme are higher too.

The likelihood is that these older workers are also statistically more likely to be the ones shielding. So they're probably doing much less of the work for much more of the pay, on average.

Legally, I don't think it is possible for a pension scheme to be altered retrospectively but I think the government should ensure that any pay rises or bonuses to NHS staff are funded in the short term by surcharging existing retirees on defined benefit schemes rather than sourcing it from general taxation. Pensioners and older workers are getting a free ride at everyone's expense at the moment and it needs to be reined in.
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