University Degree - Maths or Psychology?

Watch
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
Hi,

I feel quite stuck between Psychology and a maths degree - I had planned to apply to Psychology/neuroscience courses but now I’m not so sure.

I really enjoy maths (except mechanics especially the further maths parts) and psychology (I mostly enjoy the biological aspects/neuroscience). I find it easy to just sit and do maths for hours but psychology revision (at least for A level) is so boring. This makes me feel that it may be silly to do it at uni.

For those of you that study either maths or psychology, how do you find it? + why did you choose this subject ?? Were you at all uncertain on your choice?

Thanks!
Last edited by penelopehills; 2 weeks ago
0
reply
claireestelle
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by penelopehills)
Hi,

I feel quite stuck between Psychology and a maths degree - I had planned to apply to Psychology/neuroscience courses but now I’m not so sure.

I really enjoy maths (except mechanics especially the further maths parts) and psychology (I mostly enjoy the biological aspects/neuroscience). I find it easy to just sit and do maths for hours but psychology revision (at least for A level) is so boring. This makes me feel that it may be silly to do it at uni.

For those of you that study either maths or psychology, how do you find it? + why did you choose this subject ?? Were you at all uncertain on your choice?

Thanks!
have you considered doing a joint degree in both or perhaps natural science degrees so you can choose modules to match your interests?
0
reply
_gcx
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 weeks ago
#3
The choice seems clear from this post, if you find a subject boring at A-level it's not a great idea to take it at uni unless you're sure uni will be substantially different.

I do maths at uni, chose it just because I like it, and I wasn't really. I had tossed between CS and maths for a little bit and going way back I wanted to do English.
0
reply
mary388
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
I’d say it depends on what you want to do when you graduate. If you want to work in something related to psychology (being a psychologist, research assistant etc) then obviously you’d want to be doing psychology. But maths probably has plenty of transferable skills much like psychology if you wanted to go into any other career so really I’d say think about your future career paths and also which degree you’d enjoy most.
0
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by claireestelle)
have you considered doing a joint degree in both or perhaps natural science degrees so you can choose modules to match your interests?
I briefly looked into maths and psychology joint degree but I don’t think they seemed that ‘great’ and there were not that many probably because it’s a strange combination. But natural sciences might be good to look into
0
reply
username5397146
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 weeks ago
#6
maths.


dont so psychology unless you are 100% sure you want to go down this path.
0
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by _gcx)
The choice seems clear from this post, if you find a subject boring at A-level it's not a great idea to take it at uni unless you're sure uni will be substantially different.

I do maths at uni, chose it just because I like it, and I wasn't really. I had tossed between CS and maths for a little bit and going way back I wanted to do English.
Yeah you’re quite right but idk I was thinking that you could more focus on the things you are interested in at uni within the subject. As I do like psychology but definitely have a preference for certain topics within it.
0
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by mary388)
I’d say it depends on what you want to do when you graduate. If you want to work in something related to psychology (being a psychologist, research assistant etc) then obviously you’d want to be doing psychology. But maths probably has plenty of transferable skills much like psychology if you wanted to go into any other career so really I’d say think about your future career paths and also which degree you’d enjoy most.
I have no clue what I want to do in the future
and not sure what I would enjoy more as I get bored quite easily and currently bored with the idea of psychology but that doesn’t mean I would not get bored of maths either :/
0
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by clin.edpsych)
maths.


dont so psychology unless you are 100% sure you want to go down this path.
Thank you for the bluntness 😂 but i don’t really feel certain about either of them
0
reply
mary388
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by penelopehills)
I have no clue what I want to do in the future
and not sure what I would enjoy more as I get bored quite easily and currently bored with the idea of psychology but that doesn’t mean I would not get bored of maths either :/
I feel you. Both have good career prospects and nowadays plenty of humanities and social science graduates work in finance etc so it’s not the end of the world if you pick one over the other if that helps at all lol. Psychology is competitive but I imagine maths would be too so I don’t know if that sways you, also there’s research in psychology but in maths I’m assuming there wouldn’t be. I really would just advise you to opt for the one you feel is most enjoyable for you. For me I have an interest in philosophy but I’m going to apply for psychology as I know I can talk more passionately about psychology than philosophy and I’m sure I can take philosophy modules when the time comes anyway.
0
reply
_gcx
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by penelopehills)
Yeah you’re quite right but idk I was thinking that you could more focus on the things you are interested in at uni within the subject. As I do like psychology but definitely have a preference for certain topics within it.
Well you've really got to look into the specifics of degree programmes. Make sure you can take enough of what you like. (you're right in that eventually you get virtually a free reign) Be aware that particularly in later years, module selection vary depending on lecturer availability etc. so allow for some flexibility. It may also be possible to do a few psychology modules as part of a maths degree depending on where you go.
0
reply
username5397146
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by penelopehills)
Thank you for the bluntness 😂 but i don’t really feel certain about either of them
(Original post by penelopehills)
Hi,

I feel quite stuck between Psychology and a maths degree - I had planned to apply to Psychology/neuroscience courses but now I’m not so sure.

I really enjoy maths (except mechanics especially the further maths parts) and psychology (I mostly enjoy the biological aspects/neuroscience). I find it easy to just sit and do maths for hours but psychology revision (at least for A level) is so boring. This makes me feel that it may be silly to do it at uni.
enough said
0
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by mary388)
I feel you. Both have good career prospects and nowadays plenty of humanities and social science graduates work in finance etc so it’s not the end of the world if you pick one over the other if that helps at all lol. Psychology is competitive but I imagine maths would be too so I don’t know if that sways you, also there’s research in psychology but in maths I’m assuming there wouldn’t be. I really would just advise you to opt for the one you feel is most enjoyable for you. For me I have an interest in philosophy but I’m going to apply for psychology as I know I can talk more passionately about psychology than philosophy and I’m sure I can take philosophy modules when the time comes anyway.
Yeahh the thing about research is very true I like the idea of being able to test new hypotheses etc which you can’t do in maths as much I don’t think. Oh thats a good point on the modules. As in psychology courses there are stats modules anyway and that’s probably the aspect of maths I enjoy most
1
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by _gcx)
Well you've really got to look into the specifics of degree programmes. Make sure you can take enough of what you like. (you're right in that eventually you get virtually a free reign) Be aware that particularly in later years, module selection vary depending on lecturer availability etc. so allow for some flexibility. It may also be possible to do a few psychology modules as part of a maths degree depending on where you go.
It seems strange to have psychology modules in a maths degree but I’ll have a look around and look properly as tbh I have not looked into as much detail so far as I should have
0
reply
Dechante
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by penelopehills)
Hi,

I feel quite stuck between Psychology and a maths degree - I had planned to apply to Psychology/neuroscience courses but now I’m not so sure.

I really enjoy maths (except mechanics especially the further maths parts) and psychology (I mostly enjoy the biological aspects/neuroscience). I find it easy to just sit and do maths for hours but psychology revision (at least for A level) is so boring. This makes me feel that it may be silly to do it at uni.

For those of you that study either maths or psychology, how do you find it? + why did you choose this subject ?? Were you at all uncertain on your choice?

Thanks!
I was originally going to apply for psych and chose not to due to finding out the long process of becoming a clinical psychologist and the competition. It seems like you're not really into psychology and from what I have heard the first year and sometimes second is basically a recap of A level so if you find it boring now I doubt you'll like it at uni. If you wanted the BPS accreditation you would have to do a psychology degree unless you did the conversion degree. I know that a few unis do joint honours if you really wanted to do psychology or you could do natural sciences as that's quite flexible but some unis require you to have physics A level for that. It's good you know what parts you like of each subject as it can help tailor you to a degree that suits you
1
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by Dechante)
I was originally going to apply for psych and chose not to due to finding out the long process of becoming a clinical psychologist and the competition. It seems like you're not really into psychology and from what I have heard the first year and sometimes second is basically a recap of A level so if you find it boring now I doubt you'll like it at uni. If you wanted the BPS accreditation you would have to do a psychology degree unless you did the conversion degree. I know that a few unis do joint honours if you really wanted to do psychology or you could do natural sciences as that's quite flexible but some unis require you to have physics A level for that. It's good you know what parts you like of each subject as it can help tailor you to a degree that suits you
Yeah I don’t really plan on becoming a clinical psychologist so I’m not fussed about BPS accreditation. Another problem with natural sciences is that the life science/psychology/bio streams tend to require chemistry which I don’t take 😅 though that might not be the case everywhere
0
reply
Abigail R Brown
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by penelopehills)
Hi,

I feel quite stuck between Psychology and a maths degree - I had planned to apply to Psychology/neuroscience courses but now I’m not so sure.

I really enjoy maths (except mechanics especially the further maths parts) and psychology (I mostly enjoy the biological aspects/neuroscience). I find it easy to just sit and do maths for hours but psychology revision (at least for A level) is so boring. This makes me feel that it may be silly to do it at uni.

For those of you that study either maths or psychology, how do you find it? + why did you choose this subject ?? Were you at all uncertain on your choice?

Thanks!
Hey penelopehills

I might be biased but I'd say Psychology/Neuroscience! I am currently doing a Masters Conversion course in Psychology with the original outlook to be a child psychologist however I soon discovered neuroscience and now that has changed what I want to do completely! In the course itself you do cover maths because you look at research methods and learn about statistics and how to use computer statistical programmes, this then sets the basis for the rest of the course because it helps you really understand research findings in journals and the application of them in every day life.

Abigail
Arden University Student Ambassador
1
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by Abigail R Brown)
Hey penelopehills

I might be biased but I'd say Psychology/Neuroscience! I am currently doing a Masters Conversion course in Psychology with the original outlook to be a child psychologist however I soon discovered neuroscience and now that has changed what I want to do completely! In the course itself you do cover maths because you look at research methods and learn about statistics and how to use computer statistical programmes, this then sets the basis for the rest of the course because it helps you really understand research findings in journals and the application of them in every day life.

Abigail
Arden University Student Ambassador
Ooh computer statistical programmes sound interesting it’s nice that the psychology courses are quite broad as right now I’m thinking neuroscience but I might end up being interested in something else if I do pursue psychology.
0
reply
boulderingislife
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by penelopehills)
Hi,

I feel quite stuck between Psychology and a maths degree - I had planned to apply to Psychology/neuroscience courses but now I’m not so sure.

I really enjoy maths (except mechanics especially the further maths parts) and psychology (I mostly enjoy the biological aspects/neuroscience). I find it easy to just sit and do maths for hours but psychology revision (at least for A level) is so boring. This makes me feel that it may be silly to do it at uni.

For those of you that study either maths or psychology, how do you find it? + why did you choose this subject ?? Were you at all uncertain on your choice?

Thanks!
only do uni maths if you like proof. I made the mistake of thinking uni maths was just applied maths - learning new techniques and stuff, but you have to prove everything, and I hated proof so i changed from my maths degree to a physics degree, which was applied maths with no proof. Do your research before jumping into uni to make sure you'll enjoy the modules. If in doubt email the admissions tutor to find out about some of the modules.
1
reply
penelopehills
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by boulderingislife)
only do uni maths if you like proof. I made the mistake of thinking uni maths was just applied maths - learning new techniques and stuff, but you have to prove everything, and I hated proof so i changed from my maths degree to a physics degree, which was applied maths with no proof. Do your research before jumping into uni to make sure you'll enjoy the modules. If in doubt email the admissions tutor to find out about some of the modules.
Ah I kinda like proofs. Emailing admissions tutors seems a good idea as sometimes the modules seem so vague/the same
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you confident you could find support for your mental health if you needed it in COVID-19?

Yes (89)
21.76%
No (320)
78.24%

Watched Threads

View All