What is a masters of Chemical engineering like?

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uchiha01
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I am going to be studying an integrated masters chemistry degree with a placement year abroad at Cardiff University and I've just enrolled online for about a week now, but want to switch back to the Bsc since I want to keep my options a bit more open, in which I have already requested, hopefully they'll change it for me. I have taken on an interest in chemical engineering and I am thinking of doing a masters of chemical engineering in another uni. I know a few unis that accept undergraduates with a chemistry degree as long as they get a 2:1, which I will obviously try my very hardest to obtain the best possible grade. I know the unis that I have looked at are accredited by IChemE which helps you to become charted I think which means better careers opportunities and higher pays.

1) What is a masters degree in chemical engineering like? How is the course like?

2) The last time I've done physics and maths was during GCSEs. If I were to graduate successfully from Cardiff, would it be difficult for me to keep up if I were to do a masters in chemical engineering in another uni?

3) Do you become a chartered chemical engineer once you graduate or do you have to go through extra processes to become chartered?

4) Is a masters degree really worth it? I know for undergraduates, you pay back around 9% of your salary when you are employed. For postgraduates it's 6% and I heard you will have to pay 15% of your yearly salaries every year for the loans for 30 years, which is a lot really. Is this investment really worth it?

5) Will I be guaranteed a job after I graduate? What is a job like working as a chemical engineer and what opportunities are there?

It's probably too early for me to think this far ahead, but I have took on an interest in chemical engineering and just want more information about it. If there are any sites on chemical engineering, please do share it with me. thank you.
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Student-95
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1. It will vary depending on the course/modules you pick. A research project will be a large component then there will be optional modules to choose from. If you have universities in mind you'll find more details on their course page.

2. Will vary again depending on which modules you pick. The maths/physics in my masters year was relatively easy for the modules I picked.

3. No. To be chartered you need to meet a knowledge requirement and an experience requirement. An accredited MEng or BEng + MSc will satisfy the knowledge requirement. You will have to do something extra because you'll have an accredited MSc but not an accredited BEng.

For the experience requirement you need to give evidence against the competencies in the UK spec. The guidance is 4 years of experience but it will depend on the opportunities you get in your graduate roles.

4. Depends on what you do with it. The post grad masters will cost you more, which is why integrated master's are so popular, but you probably won't be paying it for 30 years since you'll borrow a lot less. If it allows you to go into a field you wouldn't have gotten into without it and leads to a good job then it was probably worth it. If you end up working in a job you could have gone into without it then it wasn't worth it.

5. Not even close. Most chemical engineering grads don't get jobs as engineers, let alone chemical engineers specifically. There are of course lots of other jobs you can go into but you could do most of those without the master's.
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uchiha01
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(Original post by Student-95)
1. It will vary depending on the course/modules you pick. A research project will be a large component then there will be optional modules to choose from. If you have universities in mind you'll find more details on their course page.

2. Will vary again depending on which modules you pick. The maths/physics in my masters year was relatively easy for the modules I picked.

3. No. To be chartered you need to meet a knowledge requirement and an experience requirement. An accredited MEng or BEng + MSc will satisfy the knowledge requirement. You will have to do something extra because you'll have an accredited MSc but not an accredited BEng.

For the experience requirement you need to give evidence against the competencies in the UK spec. The guidance is 4 years of experience but it will depend on the opportunities you get in your graduate roles.

4. Depends on what you do with it. The post grad masters will cost you more, which is why integrated master's are so popular, but you probably won't be paying it for 30 years since you'll borrow a lot less. If it allows you to go into a field you wouldn't have gotten into without it and leads to a good job then it was probably worth it. If you end up working in a job you could have gone into without it then it wasn't worth it.

5. Not even close. Most chemical engineering grads don't get jobs as engineers, let alone chemical engineers specifically. There are of course lots of other jobs you can go into but you could do most of those without the master's.
I see thank you very much for answering my questions! What extra process would I need to do to be able to become chartered and how long would that take? I've been seeing graduates work for particular companies like BP which is quite popular and other quite big companies as well. I enjoy chemistry as an a level subject and want to study it at degree level with a bachelors. But I also want to be making more money in the future if I'm honest, so I'm tailored towards chemical engineering. I've been looking at unis like UCL and imperial which requires a 2:1 and most students doing the Msc didn't do a chemical engineering bachelors beforehand.
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Student-95
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(Original post by uchiha01)
I see thank you very much for answering my questions! What extra process would I need to do to be able to become chartered and how long would that take? I've been seeing graduates work for particular companies like BP which is quite popular and other quite big companies as well. I enjoy chemistry as an a level subject and want to study it at degree level with a bachelors. But I also want to be making more money in the future if I'm honest, so I'm tailored towards chemical engineering. I've been looking at unis like UCL and imperial which requires a 2:1 and most students doing the Msc didn't do a chemical engineering bachelors beforehand.
Not entirely sure. If you have an accredited bachelors but no masters you can write a technical report based on your experience in the workplace that showcases master's level knowledge. I'm not familiar with the process if you have a master's but not a bachelors.

Chemical engineering isn't similar to chemistry. If you're leaving chemistry anyway and just want more money there are well paid jobs that you could go into after your bachelors.
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uchiha01
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(Original post by Student-95)
Not entirely sure. If you have an accredited bachelors but no masters you can write a technical report based on your experience in the workplace that showcases master's level knowledge. I'm not familiar with the process if you have a master's but not a bachelors.

Chemical engineering isn't similar to chemistry. If you're leaving chemistry anyway and just want more money there are well paid jobs that you could go into after your bachelors.
where can you look online for jobs that are well paid after I graduate? I've only been looking on prospects but none of the jobs look really attractive apart from chemical engineering.
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Compost
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I think you'll find that a masters in chemical engineering that you can take after a chemistry degree will be a conversion masters and (broadly speaking) get you much of the knowledge that chem eng students get in a B Eng but it won't be accredited, either at B-standard (the standard accreditation level for UK B Eng) or at F-standard (the normal accreditation level for MScs in Advanced Chemical engineering).

That said, there are a fair number of chemical engineers who do reach chartered status having read chemistry and completed a conversion masters. However, they would then need to demonstrate that they have gained the full knowledge and understanding required as well as the standard professional development before you can get chartered - and that would probably take you at least 2-3 more years than a 'standard' MEng (or BEng plus MSc) graduate.


Edit: Note, universities are not accredited by IChemE, individual programmes are, so a university may have several accredited programmes but that does not necessarily mean the course you are looking at is.
Last edited by Compost; 1 month ago
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