Were you privately educated? Watch

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4Ed
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#221
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#221
(Original post by horsecrazy)
Obviously everyone has to do some work to pass exams - in my opinion though people at state schools arent expected do well and are given less help from teachers and have to work harder than perhaps some of those who are at private schools. All teachers and schools can't be grouped together and I'm sure there are some awful teachers in private schools - but from my experience it seems privately educated people are given more help.
of course there's more help and other facilities available, that's why there's the extra money involved- else everyone would go to the local comp and save some money for another car or a pony :p:
(Original post by horsecrazy)
You seriously believe people at private school have more of an opinion in current affairs ( or in fact in anything??) than someone at a state school?
yes. from personal experience, we rarely ever discussed politics or current affairs at my state school (maybe i was just younger). whereas topics such as the war on iraq and 11/9 were on the agenda fairly frequently in the private school.
the debating club there tended to be much more lively as well
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horsecrazy
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#222
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#222
Thats probably true to a certain extent - some people dont want to work and because of them others cant work. Also a lot of private schools academically select who gets in.
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joesharp
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#223
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Even in my private school, (which is selective), you still get about half a dozen people in each year who can't be bothered to work.
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technik
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(Original post by horsecrazy)
Obviously everyone has to do some work to pass exams - in my opinion though people at state schools arent expected do well and are given less help from teachers and have to work harder than perhaps some of those who are at private schools. All teachers and schools can't be grouped together and I'm sure there are some awful teachers in private schools - but from my experience it seems privately educated people are given more help.
didnt you say you'd never been to a private school?

why the assumptions then? (most of which are inaccurate or just false)

having gone to a state grammar school and a private school i know the difference and advantages and disadvantages of each. here follows MY experience.

my state school had 1000 pupils, and got millions from the government each year. had its nice sports centre, a technology centre, IT department, canteen, public transport to the off site grass pitches, generally decent teachers, all very nice.

the private school i left the grammar school for had no canteen, no pitches, no IT at all, no government funding, we didnt even have textbooks. it was a small school, about 250 pupils. all the money came from their parents and, as the school wasnt just for the rich and posh among us, the money didnt really stretch. we walked the mile to the leisure centre to do our sports, which we payed for obviously. we didnt get transport.

the teachers at some points got payed less than £100/week (thats less than half you clowns get for a few nights in tesco), and never got anything close to state school pay, and one of them even lived in one of the spare rooms in the house that was that part of the school because he had no spouse to share costs with. wonder how many of your teachers would bother to show that commitment? heres the answer...none.

thats why i went to that school. it didnt have anything other than walls, a roof, and desks, but the teachers worked damn hard for little reward and the classes were small and we were a proper group and community. we took pride because it wasnt some anonymous tax payer pumping thousands in, but just our parents and the pupils doing fundraising to keep the place going. we did stuff you'd never dream of, like going round the teachers house for BBQs because they were actually our friends, not some Sir or Miss with a stern demeanour and red biro at the ready.

the government, responsible for educating all children, regardless of circumstance were nowhere. they failed so we did it ourselves instead.

if i'd stayed at my grammar school i'd have probably been drilled into getting 10 GCSEs at A or A*, but i prefered to go to my private school and emerged with 3 B's and 3 C's and a far better sense of value and citizenship, thinking for myself and having an education that focused not just on maths and english but art, craft, and subjects you wouldnt even be offered in your school.

perhaps when you go back to your state school after your holiday you'll appreciate what you get for next to nothing, instead of saying the private schoolers get spoon fed their exams, and get taught better...

in my experience, the grass isnt always greener on the other side as you seem to be trying to comfort yourself in thinking
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PublicSchoolAnn
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#225
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(Original post by technik)
didnt you say you'd never been to a private school?

why the assumptions then? (most of which are inaccurate or just false)

having gone to a state grammar school and a private school i know the difference and advantages and disadvantages of each. here follows MY experience.

my state school had 1000 pupils, and got millions from the government each year. had its nice sports centre, a technology centre, IT department, canteen, public transport to the off site grass pitches, generally decent teachers, all very nice.

the private school i left the grammar school for had no canteen, no pitches, no IT at all, no government funding, we didnt even have textbooks. it was a small school, about 250 pupils. all the money came from their parents and, as the school wasnt just for the rich and posh among us, the money didnt really stretch. we walked the mile to the leisure centre to do our sports, which we payed for obviously. we didnt get transport.

the teachers at some points got payed less than £100/week (thats less than half you clowns get for a few nights in tesco), and never got anything close to state school pay, and one of them even lived in one of the spare rooms in the house that was that part of the school because he had no spouse to share costs with. wonder how many of your teachers would bother to show that commitment? heres the answer...none.

thats why i went to that school. it didnt have anything other than walls, a roof, and desks, but the teachers worked damn hard for little reward and the classes were small and we were a proper group and community. we took pride because it wasnt some anonymous tax payer pumping thousands in, but just our parents and the pupils doing fundraising to keep the place going. we did stuff you'd never dream of, like going round the teachers house for BBQs because they were actually our friends, not some Sir or Miss with a stern demeanour and red biro at the ready.

the government, responsible for educating all children, regardless of circumstance were nowhere. they failed so we did it ourselves instead.

if i'd stayed at my grammar school i'd have probably been drilled into getting 10 GCSEs at A or A*, but i prefered to go to my private school and emerged with 3 B's and 3 C's and a far better sense of value and citizenship, thinking for myself and having an education that focused not just on maths and english but art, craft, and subjects you wouldnt even be offered in your school.

perhaps when you go back to your state school after your holiday you'll appreciate what you get for next to nothing, instead of saying the private schoolers get spoon fed their exams, and get taught better...

in my experience, the grass isnt always greener on the other side as you seem to be trying to comfort yourself in thinking
Salute!
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4Ed
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#226
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technik can i enquire as to whereabouts you go to school/live?

that doesn't sound like an english private school to me.

the minimum wage here is like 4.5 quid.... so how can these teachers be earning a hundred pounds a week, if they do 40 hour weeks lik most teachers do? besides, teachers are generally a fairly well paid profession, so there's no chance they'd be on minimum wage.
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technik
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#227
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(Original post by 4Ed)
technik can i enquire as to whereabouts you go to school/live?

that doesn't sound like an english private school to me.

the minimum wage here is like 4.5 quid.... so how can these teachers be earning a hundred pounds a week, if they do 40 hour weeks lik most teachers do? besides, teachers are generally a fairly well paid profession, so there's no chance they'd be on minimum wage.
wasnt england, as im from northern ireland

and yes, the minimum wage applies here too, but the teachers took the hardship

the grammar school was : bangor grammar school
the private was : http://www.holywood-steiner.co.uk/
im now at a FE college, and its very well funded
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horsecrazy
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#228
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didnt you say you'd never been to a private school?

why the assumptions then? (most of which are inaccurate or just false)

having gone to a state grammar school and a private school i know the difference and advantages and disadvantages of each. here follows MY experience.

my state school had 1000 pupils, and got millions from the government each year. had its nice sports centre, a technology centre, IT department, canteen, public transport to the off site grass pitches, generally decent teachers, all very nice.

the private school i left the grammar school for had no canteen, no pitches, no IT at all, no government funding, we didnt even have textbooks. it was a small school, about 250 pupils. all the money came from their parents and, as the school wasnt just for the rich and posh among us, the money didnt really stretch. we walked the mile to the leisure centre to do our sports, which we payed for obviously. we didnt get transport.

the teachers at some points got payed less than £100/week (thats less than half you clowns get for a few nights in tesco), and never got anything close to state school pay, and one of them even lived in one of the spare rooms in the house that was that part of the school because he had no spouse to share costs with. wonder how many of your teachers would bother to show that commitment? heres the answer...none.

thats why i went to that school. it didnt have anything other than walls, a roof, and desks, but the teachers worked damn hard for little reward and the classes were small and we were a proper group and community. we took pride because it wasnt some anonymous tax payer pumping thousands in, but just our parents and the pupils doing fundraising to keep the place going. we did stuff you'd never dream of, like going round the teachers house for BBQs because they were actually our friends, not some Sir or Miss with a stern demeanour and red biro at the ready.

the government, responsible for educating all children, regardless of circumstance were nowhere. they failed so we did it ourselves instead.

if i'd stayed at my grammar school i'd have probably been drilled into getting 10 GCSEs at A or A*, but i prefered to go to my private school and emerged with 3 B's and 3 C's and a far better sense of value and citizenship, thinking for myself and having an education that focused not just on maths and english but art, craft, and subjects you wouldnt even be offered in your school.

perhaps when you go back to your state school after your holiday you'll appreciate what you get for next to nothing, instead of saying the private schoolers get spoon fed their exams, and get taught better...

in my experience, the grass isnt always greener on the other side as you seem to be trying to comfort yourself in thinking
LOL :eek: Your story has moved me and I will indeed go back to school enjoying it thouroughly as I had before and knowing that the grass is certainly much greener on my side
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technik
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#229
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(Original post by horsecrazy)
LOL :eek:
lol indeed.

whats more funny/disturbing (depending on your view) is most of you state school people wont actually realise education isnt just about grades and exams until you've long finished...

instead, your teachers arent interesting in letting you learn, just getting enough trash in your head to guarantee some grade letter on a certificate, so they can go back the next year and say they've passed XX% of drones.
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horsecrazy
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#230
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And why exactly might we not realise that?
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kellywood_5
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#231
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(Original post by technik)
lol indeed.

whats more funny/disturbing (depending on your view) is most of you state school people wont actually realise education isnt just about grades and exams until you've long finished...

instead, your teachers arent interesting in letting you learn, just getting enough trash in your head to guarantee some grade letter on a certificate, so they can go back the next year and say they've passed XX% of drones.
Yes, but it has to be more about grades and exams for us than it does for you because we have to prove ourselves to uni admissions tutors/employers, whereas with private school students, the person judging you will probably already have it in their head that you're good enough for the place/job.

Actually it depends on the teacher. I would have thought teachers in private schools would be more obsessed with their students' grades since their parents are paying for them! Some of our teachers are interested in letting us learn, but it does depend.
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TheWolf
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(Original post by horsecrazy)
And why exactly might we not realise that?
because of your anti-private school attitudes?
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technik
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#233
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(Original post by horsecrazy)
And why exactly might we not realise that?
too busy trying to cram in enough useless cack to get those grades your signature requires
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horsecrazy
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#234
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the debating club there tended to be much more lively as well
it must have been if you were in it - ahem "Working class people have no opinions" lol
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horsecrazy
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#235
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If useless cack lets be a vet then useless cack is what ill learn
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technik
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#236
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(Original post by kellywood_5)
Yes, but it has to be more about grades and exams for us than it does for you because we have to prove ourselves to uni admissions tutors/employers, whereas with private school students, the person judging you will probably already have it in their head that you're good enough for the place/job.

Actually it depends on the teacher. I would have thought teachers in private schools would be more obsessed with their students' grades since their parents are paying for them! Some of our teachers are interested in letting us learn, but it does depend.
you're missing the point of private education, and in particular the education i had.

my parents knew full well they could have paid their few hundred quid, shoved me in a uniform and let the grammar school have me recording grades in the top 20%

but they allowed me to leave and go to my school (and paid a few thousand quid as they could afford it), knowing i wouldnt get the same grades (which i didnt) but that i would have got a proper EDUCATION

your comment shows my point up perfectly. you believe that everyone is just interested in grades. in reality, this is far from the truth.

as for admissions people, they usually give more weight to the quality of your interview/people skills and personal statements than grades. they'll have enough people turning up with the same grades...
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kellywood_5
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#237
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(Original post by technik)
the teachers at some points got payed less than £100/week (thats less than half you clowns get for a few nights in tesco), and never got anything close to state school pay, and one of them even lived in one of the spare rooms in the house that was that part of the school because he had no spouse to share costs with. wonder how many of your teachers would bother to show that commitment? heres the answer...none.
How do you know that? Some of my teachers are extremely committed and they're not in the job for the financial benefits. I bet your school was an exception though, either that or the system in Northern Ireland is different because I'm pretty sure teachers in private schools tend to get paid a lot more than those is state.

(Original post by technik)
the government, responsible for educating all children, regardless of circumstance were nowhere. they failed so we did it ourselves instead.
The government provided you with a perfectly good school- if you chose to reject it in favour of a private school, that's down to you. :p:
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Elles
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(Original post by yawn1)
I am re-iterating what many parents have told the 6th form head of my school. We have an intake of about 200 in the lower 6th and many of the new kids are from independent schools which also have 6th forms offering academic/vocational subjects. They are quite open about the reasons for the change over, ie to be able to put down their school on their UCAS application as a state school - for the very reasons I said in my previous post.
so obviously it does happen.. your anecdote proves. I was just providing a counter in that some warped sense that they'll be more likely to get into uni by suddenly switching to the state sector isn't the only reason why someone may change.

Obviously, there might be reasons other than this for a few parents but it stands to reason that no parent would remove their kid from a school where they have been for 5 years unless the attractions of the move were in their best interests!
& in my case, & no doubt some other people.. the move was 'in my best interests' insofar as it allowed me to actually take AS & A2s, rather than stopping my education post GCSE! how selfish of me.. :p:
no more cynical reason than that..


& incidentally, my state 6th form had far far superior facilities to those of my tiny school.
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technik
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#239
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(Original post by kellywood_5)
How do you know that? Some of my teachers are extremely committed and they're not in the job for the financial benefits. I bet your school was an exception though, either that or the system in Northern Ireland is different because I'm pretty sure teachers in private schools tend to get paid a lot more than those is state.



The government provided you with a perfectly good school- if you chose to reject it in favour of a private school, that's down to you. :p:
certainly is an exception. its easy to find the types of private schools most people have the stereotypical view of. the ones with huge fees and fancy uniforms. my point it isnt all like that.

indeed, i and my parents rejected it because we didnt believe it was providing a good education. but does that mean the children who had gone to my private school since they were 3yrs old and never had been anywhere else were less entitled to support though?
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kellywood_5
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#240
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[QUOTE=technik]your comment shows my point up perfectly. you believe that everyone is just interested in grades. in reality, this is far from the truth.[QUOTE]

I don't believe grades are all that matters, BUT in the real world, you need decent qualifications to get anywhere. There's a difference between obsessing over getting in the top 20% or whatever and not wanting to end up working in McDonald's.
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