veerapattras
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I am wondering about physician associates degrees in the next 3 years. Will it be more competitive in the selection process? I am an international student, will it be harder to get in? Also, will there be extra process needed, eg UCAT/BMAT?
1
reply
ecolier
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by veerapattras)
I am wondering about physician associates degrees in the next 3 years. Will it be more competitive in the selection process?
I don't know how anyone will know this.

But assume that it will, since PA is getting increasingly well known as a profession, and more and more people will be applying to it / considering it.

On the other hand, you have more universities offering the course, so it may all balance out.

I am an international student, will it be harder to get in? Also, will there be extra process needed, eg UCAT/BMAT?
It may well be - for Medicine anyway the places for international students are strictly limited. Also it will be expensive for you, for PAs I think local students get some sort of bursary / grant but it wouldn't apply for international students.

There is currently no need to do the UCAT / BMAT - they are for medical / dental admissions (+ some Oxbridge courses) only.

P.S. The Medicine forum, as it says, is for medicine admission queries, your thread has been moved to the Healthcare forum. Hopefully you'll get better responses here.
1
reply
veerapattras
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
I want to know if graduating and working as a physician assistant in the nhs has high job security like doctors or not. Also, will there be progression in this job?

I am still unsure on what is the differences between doctors and physician assistant as in the limit of the job. Or even the differences between physician assistant and nurses as there seems to be a lot of overlapping.
0
reply
veerapattras
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by ecolier)
I don't know how anyone will know this.

But assume that it will, since PA is getting increasingly well known as a profession, and more and more people will be applying to it / considering it.

On the other hand, you have more universities offering the course, so it may all balance out.



It may well be - for Medicine anyway the places for international students are strictly limited. Also it will be expensive for you, for PAs I think local students get some sort of bursary / grant but it wouldn't apply for international students.

There is currently no need to do the UCAT / BMAT - they are for medical / dental admissions (+ some Oxbridge courses) only.

P.S. The Medicine forum, as it says, is for medicine admission queries, your thread has been moved to the Healthcare forum. Hopefully you'll get better responses here.
thank you so much. I shall keep an eye on the application requirements and ask the unis more details on the how many internationals they will accept
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by veerapattras)
I want to know if graduating and working as a physician assistant in the nhs has high job security like doctors or not. Also, will there be progression in this job?
There will be lots of opening and vacancies while the profession is getting more popular as I said. I personally think there'll be job security at least initially - it depends on whether there's over-saturation like training (too many) pharmacists which is what we're doing at the moment.

Progression-wise, many PAs start in a hospital-based job at Band 6 and after a year / two years will move on to Band 7. There may be some opportunities to work at Band 8 as a senior PA but that's the ceiling if you wanted to work as a pure PA.

Obviously, PAs can also move on to teaching, research, management where they may earn additional income (the latter could be the most lucrative). There is no progression like a junior doctor moving from FY1 -> core training -> specialty training -> consultant.

I am still unsure on what is the differences between doctors and physician assistant as in the limit of the job. Or even the differences between physician assistant and nurses as there seems to be a lot of overlapping.
What do you think are the differences? Then I'll correct you if you're wrong. You may well be asked this question in your interviews.

(Original post by veerapattras)
thank you so much. I shall keep an eye on the application requirements and ask the unis more details on the how many internationals they will accept
No problem.
Last edited by ecolier; 1 month ago
0
reply
veerapattras
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#6
I know that PA are supposed to reduce the workload of gp so I believe they do the tasks such as history taking, diagnosis but they cannot prescribe or do X-ray. I believe that they also follow up with patients conditions which I think pg do not normally do as they have lots of patients to take care of and so the process might not be continuous, the PA might come in and help with that. But other than that, I am not sure what are the tasks that are specifically for PA. I saw on some site as well that they do go in to surgery operations with doctors too but I am not quite sure about that. Also, I saw that PA mostly work in general practice rather that special care? Will that change in the future that PA will be working more in secondary care there is now? I will be collecting as much info as I can but the time I will be applying for 2 yr PA degree will be 3-4 years in the future so I will have to keep updated. I believe there might be some changes around the career as it is a relatively new job.

I saw on some website saying that do not confuse Physician associate and physician assistant. Correct me if I am wrong, but I think that they are the same job and that Physician associate used to be called as physician assistant before.
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by veerapattras)
I know that PA are supposed to reduce the workload of gp so I believe they do the tasks such as history taking, diagnosis but they cannot prescribe or do X-ray.
Not just GPs, but hospital doctors in general. They may be able to prescribe and request imaging in the future.

Specialist nurses can prescribe and request imaging in a limited capacity within their own field.

I believe that they also follow up with patients conditions which I think pg do not normally do as they have lots of patients to take care of and so the process might not be continuous, the PA might come in and help with that.
Well PAs who work in GPs do basically what the practice nurse does - but they can also fulfil a sort of a junior doctor role in the GP.

But other than that, I am not sure what are the tasks that are specifically for PA. I saw on some site as well that they do go in to surgery operations with doctors too but I am not quite sure about that.
They can assist (with time and practice) I'm sure, but currently even medical students, nurses and ODPs can assist. It depends on what you mean by "doing the operation". Some assistants literally just hold the scalpel for the surgeon, while other times they could be performing crucial roles.

Remember, physician associates is primarily working in a non-surgical capacity. There are going to be new "surgical associate" training coming online shortly.

Also, I saw that PA mostly work in general practice rather that special care? Will that change in the future that PA will be working more in secondary care there is now?
There are more jobs (currently) in GP but it doesn't mean you'll have to. 3 of my best PA friends are working in a hospital and they love it.

I will be collecting as much info as I can but the time I will be applying for 2 yr PA degree will be 3-4 years in the future so I will have to keep updated. I believe there might be some changes around the career as it is a relatively new job.
Yes, it's a relatively new role in the UK.

I saw on some website saying that do not confuse Physician associate and physician assistant. Correct me if I am wrong, but I think that they are the same job and that Physician associate used to be called as physician assistant before.
In the UK it's called physician associate. There is no physician assistant here in the UK.
0
reply
veerapattras
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
Thank you for the info. I know that PAs are generalist. Can they move around in terms of specialty (peadiatric etc)? If a PA do an extra pg degree will that help with the work of secondary care?

What are the pros and cons of being a PA?
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by veerapattras)
Thank you for the info. I know that PAs are generalist. Can they move around in terms of specialty (peadiatric etc)?
Yes

If a PA do an extra pg degree will that help with the work of secondary care?
They can already - I have PA friends currently work in elderly care medicine, acute medicine, gastroenterology, respiratory medicine, paeds etc. etc. These are all secondary care.

What are the pros and cons of being a PA?
I can't really list all of them - you tell me what you think are the pros and cons and I'll tell you if you're right.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (103)
13.27%
I'm not sure (33)
4.25%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (239)
30.8%
I have already dropped out (19)
2.45%
I'm not a current university student (382)
49.23%

Watched Threads

View All