wildstar9
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I messed up badly
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ecolier
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(Original post by wildstar9)
I messed up badly
Why does it matter? The chances are you'll have to move (even if you get in) between FY1 and FY2; and of course for core / specialty training.

Do you really think you can stay in one place for the entirety of your career*?

*A small minority can - but they would have been at the top at any competitive selection process with lots of publications / presentations etc. etc.
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wildstar9
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(Original post by ecolier)
Why does it matter? The chances are you'll have to move (even if you get in) between FY1 and FY2; and of course for core / specialty training.

Do you really think you can stay in one place for the entirety of your career?
I don't want to pay for rent as my family home is in London.
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ecolier
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(Original post by wildstar9)
I don't want to pay for rent as my family home is in London.
Well as I said, you'd have to move out or be prepared for a hell of a commute at some point.
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wildstar9
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(Original post by ecolier)
Well as I said, you'd have to move out or be prepared for a hell of a commute at some point.
How hard is it to get atleast 40/50 in the SJT
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ecolier
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(Original post by wildstar9)
How hard is it to get atleast 40/50 in the SJT
I don't know because I didn't take it - perhaps you should have posted in the TSR Med Students' thread. Anyway you have made a thread here so we'll see if someone will come and answer your question.

Whatever happens, perhaps leaving London / your family home for a year or two will be a good thing when you look back in the future.
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wildstar9
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(Original post by ecolier)
I don't know because I didn't take it - perhaps you should have posted in the TSR Med Students' thread. Anyway you have made a thread here so we'll see if someone will come and answer your question.

Whatever happens, perhaps leaving London / your family home for a year or two will be a good thing when you look back in the future.
I've lived 5 years away from them haha.

I would be open-minded about going somewhere else but I don't know, I have heard some horror stories about certain hospitals - i.e lack of support etc
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ecolier
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(Original post by wildstar9)
I've lived 5 years away from them haha.

I would be open-minded about going somewhere else but I don't know, I have heard some horror stories about certain hospitals - i.e lack of support etc
London hospitals aren't necessarily a beacon of glory and hope. The NHS, being a monopoly employer, will try its best to screw its employees. London isn't really short of doctors willing to locum either, so the rates (if you wanted to do it) will be lower than nationally.

In my personal experience, Yorkshire is an excellent place to train and work (well most hospitals). It's also very non-competitive except in spots (Leeds, Sheffield, York) which ironically is where you are most likely to be treated as a number rather than a person.

In my opinion, the more remote / stigmatised a city / town is, the better my experience e.g. Boston, Lincolnshire was good to me.
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wildstar9
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(Original post by ecolier)
London hospitals aren't necessarily a beacon of glory and hope. The NHS, being a monopoly employer, will try its best to screw its employees.

In my personal experience, Yorkshire is an excellent place to train and work (well most hospitals). It's also very non-competitive except in spots (Leeds, Sheffield, York) which ironically is where you are most likely to be treated as a number rather than a person.

In my opinion, the more remote / stigmatised a city / town is, the better my experience e.g. Boston, Lincolnshire was good to me.
What have you heard about Birmingham/manchester?
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ecolier
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(Original post by wildstar9)
What have you heard about Birmingham/manchester?
Busy?

Cities with several acute NHS trusts can be fragmented, I don't know whether that's a good or bad thing.

P.S. Both cities can be competitive anyway, West Midlands is divided into WM Central, North and South and with a low-ish score you may be sent away from Birmingham (for at least a year). Same for Manchester.
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wildstar9
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(Original post by ecolier)
Busy?

Cities with several acute NHS trusts can be fragmented, I don't know whether that's a good or bad thing.

P.S. Both cities can be competitive anyway, West Midlands is divided into WM Central, North and South and with a low-ish score you may be sent away from Birmingham (for at least a year). Same for Manchester.
Northern Ireland?
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ecolier
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(Original post by wildstar9)
Northern Ireland?
Could be good - I have only visited twice but not worked there. I have a colleague who only just started there recently for specialty training.

The advantage is that it's really cheap - in terms of living standards. The disadvantage is that you're far from home and will need to be on the ferry (not recommended!) or plane if you wanted to come home.
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hslakaal
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To answer your original question: meh, who knows? Might be harder than had you gotten top decile with a PhD and 2 pubs under your belt, but conversely, the SJT is such a toss-up that you don't know really.



Instead of moping about whether you'll be able to work in your desired location, be practical: can you do anything about your EPM? No. Move on.

Perhaps work hard and go on the wards, prepare for the SJT (I am a big proponent of the idea that being exposed to the wards helps with SJT) to help with the SJT? Sounds more practical.


Worst comes to worst, you end up in a place you really didn't want to be in. Are you going to quit Foundation in that case? If not, don't waste your time and mental reserves on something so insignificant in the grand scheme of things.
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wildstar9
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I ain't too bothered about it tbh

How are wards good opportunities for SJT revision lol...
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Chief Wiggum
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Yes depending on SJT/publications.
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Ceryni
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(Original post by wildstar9)
I've lived 5 years away from them haha.

I would be open-minded about going somewhere else but I don't know, I have heard some horror stories about certain hospitals - i.e lack of support etc
You could always go for a hospital out of London and either commute from home or just live somewhere where you can regularly get trains back to see family?

I work in EBH, but commute from north London. Quite a lot of junior docs (& consultants!) in my hospital live in London and commute, train is only like 20 mins from Finsbury Park (which v much gives away what hospital it is for anyone who knows EBH lol). I’ve found the commute pretty easy, actually quite enjoy it tbh as going against the grain in commuting out of London rather than in means you basically always get a seat, esp. with the current WFH culture for most office folk. My BIL used to commute from romsford to Southend, and Watford Hospital is famously popular amongst the EBH lot for being a top choice for ppl wanting to commute from London.
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Is 39 even a low ish score. I would have thought it's actually a good score
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FlyingOrthopod
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Its not impossible but will be tough to get into Norwest and north central london, those regions normally require a total score of 85. South thames deanery may easier to get into but chances are, you will spend one year working in london and the other year working in Kent/Surrey/Sussex. ST deanery was around 79/80 points when i applied. Basically in summary, you'll need to get 40/50 in your SJT to get into london which isn't impossible and is actually just slightly over the average score.

I got into ST deanery with a EPM of 41 when I did foundation.
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(Original post by FlyingOrthopod)
Its not impossible but will be tough to get into Norwest and north central london, those regions normally require a total score of 85. South thames deanery may easier to get into but chances are, you will spend one year working in london and the other year working in Kent/Surrey/Sussex. ST deanery was around 79/80 points when i applied. Basically in summary, you'll need to get 40/50 in your SJT to get into london which isn't impossible and is actually just slightly over the average score.

I got into ST deanery with a EPM of 41 when I did foundation.
How difficult is it to get 40 in the SJT? I got 38 in the EPM and wanted Wessex, ST or EBH? Very worried about this tbh but nothing j can do about my EPM now
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I was in a similar situation to you, flopped the SJT, and now I'm 4 hours away from London. Try your best but gotta learn to live with things, it's 2 extra years, use it to motivate yourself to be in better stead for the next set of applications.
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