username5376192
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If I get a job when I turn 16 at tescos or something can I move out?

Will it be enough to rent an apartment of something
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gracieee16
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um how much would u be earning a month?? most rents cost £500-£1000
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username5376192
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(Original post by gracieee16)
um how much would u be earning a month?? most rents cost £500-£1000
How much do 16 year-old earn monthly??
Am I allowed legally to live alone?

What rights do my parents have over me at 16?
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Moonlight rain
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Not in London
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username5376192
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(Original post by Moonlight rain)
Not in London
London would be too expensive anyway...

I don't really have much of a choice to stay home so let's say I worked two jobs at tesco and aldi while doing a levels, would that be doable financially and workload wise?
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wastedcuriosity
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(Original post by Anonymous69420)
London would be too expensive anyway...

I don't really have much of a choice to stay home so let's say I worked two jobs at tesco and aldi while doing a levels, would that be doable financially and workload wise?
Not really, no. To be able to pay rent I'm pretty sure you'd need a full-time job, which wouldn't really be possible whilst going to sixth form + revision + learning to live by yourself
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Anonymous69420)
London would be too expensive anyway...

I don't really have much of a choice to stay home so let's say I worked two jobs at tesco and aldi while doing a levels, would that be doable financially and workload wise?
No, none of that sounds realistic i'm afraid

Landlords generally don't rent to under 18s, you'd struggle to arrange utilities, supermarkets don't let you work for their rivals and often pay bad rate to kids and you simply wouldn't have the time + school.
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Tamrin
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Depends where you live, if you wanna discuss rent. You should create an expenses sheet first..

Outline your monthly expenditure for rent, utility bills (if the place you're looking at doesn't include it with the rent), groceries, going out, clothing, education. Pretty sure I missed one or two categories, but it's a good start.

Google is your best friend, honestly. Look at potential flat listings, or even research how much an individual spends on groceries on average per month. It'd be even better if you could track your finances right now and keep a note of how much you spend (or how much your parents spend) on just you.

After that, calculate your monthly/yearly salary. See if you fall into a deficit or if your Tesco job could just about cover your expenditure (and more! It's important to have savings).

But of course, by the end, ask yourself if moving out is the best financial move for yourself now. 16 is a pretty young age and it's not wise to move out unless you already have savings; it's generally advised you have 3 months worth of rent/utility bills/groceries etc money saved up.
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username5376192
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Oh, thanks for)

(Original post by wastedcuriosity)
Not really, no. To be able to pay rent I'm pretty sure you'd need a full-time job, which wouldn't really be possible whilst going to sixth form + revision + learning to live by yourself
(Original post by StriderHort)
No, none of that sounds realistic i'm afraid

Landlords generally don't rent to under 18s, you'd struggle to arrange utilities, supermarkets don't let you work for their rivals and often pay bad rate to kids and you simply wouldn't have the time + school.
Oh, thanks for the replies anyway

(Original post by Tamrin)
Depends where you live, if you wanna discuss rent. You should create an expenses sheet first..

Outline your monthly expenditure for rent, utility bills (if the place you're looking at doesn't include it with the rent), groceries, going out, clothing, education. Pretty sure I missed one or two categories, but it's a good start.

Google is your best friend, honestly. Look at potential flat listings, or even research how much an individual spends on groceries on average per month. It'd be even better if you could track your finances right now and keep a note of how much you spend (or how much your parents spend) on just you.

After that, calculate your monthly/yearly salary. See if you fall into a deficit or if your Tesco job could just about cover your expenditure (and more! It's important to have savings).

But of course, by the end, ask yourself if moving out is the best financial move for yourself now. 16 is a pretty young age and it's not wise to move out unless you already have savings; it's generally advised you have 3 months worth of rent/utility bills/groceries etc money saved up.
I might as well give it a try, I really don't have much of a choice
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username5376192
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I'm not 16 yet, I'm turning 16 soon
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Moonlight rain
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(Original post by Anonymous69420)
London would be too expensive anyway...

I don't really have much of a choice to stay home so let's say I worked two jobs at tesco and aldi while doing a levels, would that be doable financially and workload wise?
Sure
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treasonous
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I moved out at 16, and I went to a hostel (it's sometimes called supportive living). the YMCA are the most widespread hostels, and operate in a lot of different areas.

You usually need to do some research, to find out what hostels are near you, and gather some contact info for each of them. Sometimes hostel waiting lists are quite long, so by contacting a few different places, you decrease the time you'll be waiting.
The next step will be to ring up the hostels, and arrange an interview with them. This is always a good idea, as you can get a feel for the place, and see if you'd like to live there.

Rent wise, housing benefit (or universal credit) covers all of it or a percentage of the fee if you're working. As it is supported living, you will be assigned a keyworker, who has meetings with you to make sure you're doing okay, and you can bring up any issues you are facing. Your keyworker will also help you apply for housing benefit.

With some hostels, you have to share certain living spaces (like a bathroom & kitchen) but you will have your own room. Other places have en suites in their rooms, and have a small kitchenette for each individual resident.

I would definitely have a look into it, as once you have lived there long enough, they will help you apply for a flat.

Hope this helps!
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Kerzen
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(Original post by Anonymous69420)

I don't really have much of a choice to stay home.
What's happening at home?
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username5376192
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(Original post by treasonous)
I moved out at 16, and I went to a hostel (it's sometimes called supportive living). the YMCA are the most widespread hostels, and operate in a lot of different areas.

You usually need to do some research, to find out what hostels are near you, and gather some contact info for each of them. Sometimes hostel waiting lists are quite long, so by contacting a few different places, you decrease the time you'll be waiting.
The next step will be to ring up the hostels, and arrange an interview with them. This is always a good idea, as you can get a feel for the place, and see if you'd like to live there.

Rent wise, housing benefit (or universal credit) covers all of it or a percentage of the fee if you're working. As it is supported living, you will be assigned a keyworker, who has meetings with you to make sure you're doing okay, and you can bring up any issues you are facing. Your keyworker will also help you apply for housing benefit.

With some hostels, you have to share certain living spaces (like a bathroom & kitchen) but you will have your own room. Other places have en suites in their rooms, and have a small kitchenette for each individual resident.

I would definitely have a look into it, as once you have lived there long enough, they will help you apply for a flat.

Hope this helps!
Thank you!
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username5376192
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(Original post by Kerzen)
What's happening at home?
Toxic home. Me and my mum are on very thin ice, I don't really feel safe tbh if she does lose it I wont be able to defend myself like all those other times :/
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username5376192
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What's a house share? I saw some and they seem super cheap...like 10 pounds per month
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Kerzen
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(Original post by Anonymous69420)
Toxic home. Me and my mum are on very thin ice, I don't really feel safe tbh if she does lose it I wont be able to defend myself like all those other times :/
Is she assaulting you physically?
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wastedcuriosity
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(Original post by Anonymous69420)
What's a house share? I saw some and they seem super cheap...like 10 pounds per month
Where you share a house with other people, I believe you have your own room and areas like the lounge, kitchen, toilets etc are communal.
I think you'd have to find some people to share with though
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username5376192
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(Original post by wastedcuriosity)
Where you share a house with other people, I believe you have your own room and areas like the lounge, kitchen, toilets etc are communal.
I think you'd have to find some people to share with though
Ohh alright, I might consider that and the hostel option

(Original post by Kerzen)
Is she assaulting you physically?
She has but right now it's just threats. It's cuz she's religious and forcing me to be the same, she's just very controlling regardless of religion. I've had enough.
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Kerzen
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(Original post by Anonymous69420)
What's a house share? I saw some and they seem super cheap...like 10 pounds per month
There is no such thing as a house share for £10 a month.

Where on earth have you seen that?
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