The Student Room Group

Trinity College Dublin

For English. Anybody know what it's like etc. and what the typical offers are (i know they are post-results). And you dont apply through UCAS so does that mean you could have 5 on UCAS, + this one?
yeah first you dont need to apply through UCAS..and yes it is possible to have 5 on UCAS..and this one..there is a different route for it which is available on the site ..what course exactly do you want to apply for?..undergrads?..post grad??..it depends on the subjects you have taken there is a certain number of points you need to reach..so if you can let me know i can help you out..
is www.tcd.ie
You are here: Undergraduate Admissions » How to apply » Am I a EU applicant?

Am I an EU applicant?
An EU applicant is a person:

who is ordinarily resident* in the EU
AND
who will have received full-time post primary education
AND/OR
who has worked full-timea in the EU
for three of the five years immediately preceding admission to Trinity College
OR
who holds a passport from an EU state and has received all full-time post primary education in the EU
OR
who has
official refugee statusb
OR
been granted humanitarian leave to remain in the State
and who has been ordinarily resident in the EU for three of the five years immediately preceding admission to Trinity College
Notes:

Where an applicant can show that they have been in receipt of social welfare payments this may be taken in lieu of full-time employment.
Applicants who have written confirmation that they have been allowed to come to Ireland as part of the family re-unification scheme may also be eligible.
"Immediately preceding admission” refers to the three-year period October 2005 – October 2008.
Where the status of a CAO application is not clear the Admissions Office will contact applicants in March/April to verify that their application is in accordance with the EU definition above. Supporting documentation may be required.
A student’s registered status (EU/non-EU) cannot be changed during a programme for which he/she is registered.
* For students aged under 23, the student's parent(s) must also ordinarily resident (that is - principal residence for the purpose of taxation) in an EU Member State for three of the five years prior to students entry to Trinity College.

All other applications are considered to be non-EU applications.
Reply 3
You apply via CAO (Central Admissions Office). It's about £45 and you can pick 10 courses in Southern Ireland. That's about all I know. Probably need 4 A levels as most uni's in Ireland require this.
Reply 4
My friend does English & Drama there ,she loves it..lots of oppertunities
if this is the course your looking for then:

Course Type: Undergraduate
Course Code: TR023
No. of Places: 46
Min Entry Points 2007:510* points
Duration: 4 Years Full Time
Award: B.A.

Specific Entry Requirements
Leaving Certificate HC3 English
Advanced GCE (A-Level) Grade C English literature (A or B)
Or:
Grade C English language (A or B)
Reply 6
510* (with an *) means not everyone with 510 points etc. are offered a place ,interviews are held also
Reply 7
ahh okay, thats a great help :smile:
so is the 510 points like ucas points?

im doing; english lit, History and RS at A2 level and have a geography AS

Chheers
that am not sure about..
you'r most welcome!
jonnosonly1864
ahh okay, thats a great help :smile:
so is the 510 points like ucas points?

im doing; english lit, History and RS at A2 level and have a geography AS

Chheers

No they're not

UCD's website explains it fairly well as I remember.
Reply 10
*** It's very easy and quick for Europeans to apply for UNDERGRADUATE... so well worth doing, just on the outside chance you might have the points, or equivalent points. Europeans (Irish and anyone else in the EU) should see www.cao.ie to apply. There is no personal statement or references. And for almost all subjects, there is no interview or additional exams (medicine, drama and music are among the exceptions). Your CAO application has no bearing on your UCAS application (If you are a graduate, wholly different procedures and fees apply).


EU continentals and IB look here.
http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/requirements/matriculation/other/

A Level candidates look here
http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/requirements/matriculation/gcse/

Be very careful with the minimum matriculation requirements. You more or less need passes (any grade will do) in maths, English and a language in some form (i.e. you must not be a one-trick wonder… you need a broad education).

http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/requirements/entrypoints/

http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/admissions_info/matric_requirements.php

The scoring system for A Levels etc at the CAO and TCD may differ… use TCD’s.
TCD sets two additional exams for school leavers that are not offered in the Leaving Cert (currently these are Biblical Studies and Geology, if you happen to know anything about either!).


*** Apply to the CAO well in time, like January! The standard closing date is very early on. It's very easy to apply ... can do it in 5 minutes with no prior knowledge... just need a credit card to pay a modest application fee (or a pen to note down address to send a postal order), and you might want to take a few minutes to decide preferences. Dead simple. If you leave it much later, a higher fee applies or it may not be possible to apply at all... AT ALL! July is most likely too late! Not like UCAS, the system in the UK! The CAO is very strict.
You can change ALL your course choices at the CAO sometime in June AT NO COST - after you have done your school leaving exams. So try to make the right initial choices, but don’t agonise too much. And do not miss the procedures for late change of mind.

EU citizens, with prior residency in Europe, in most circumstances do not pay fees (other than the EUR 1000 capitation/ registration charge). However most applicants from outside of the EU do:

Trinity's undergraduate registration charge for the coming year is almost €1000.
Plus the standard fee at TCD is 4000+ euro for Europeans, but this is waived in almost all circumstances for EU residents / citizens
Be careful... you may be required to pay the full EUR 4000+ fee in some circumstances, e.g. a change in your course of study in mid stream!
The Irish government now wants to reintroduce full fees for everyone (the EUR 4000 ones). That would set them about the same level as in England. Fees are going higher in all countries. Just a question of time before they rise in Ireland too (with loans available for those that can’t pay fees).

http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/fees/

http://www.tcd.ie/Treasurers_Office/...degreefees.php

The fees for non EU citizens or non EU residents are likely to be mostly in the area of €15,500-27,000/yr for 2008/09 (B. Ed Home Economics is among the bargain courses, but then you may be getting your education from associate institutions like these… http://www.tcd.ie/Communications/Facts/assoc-inst.php).


4A's at A-Level are equivalent to six A1 grades in the Irish leaving cert, or the full 600 points.
Many applicants in the Rep Ireland take more than 6 subjects for the Leaving Cert, in order mainly to satisfy the min. matriculation requirements (Maths, English etc).
Needless to say, very few people actually achieve 6A1's, or anywhere near it. Indeed even 550 points is so rare that anyone with that level of points (or equivalent points) is given a modest scholarship as a reward, the Exhibition Scholarships (in 2007, around 500 entrants got this, all scoring 545 or above… that is 500 out of 15,000).

Lower down, the minimum points for straight maths might be e.g. 465 points- that’s around AAA at A-level plus a pass at AS level. That’s almost on par with Oxbridge requirements!

Biblical Studies is one of the easier courses to get into. So the minimum for this course might be e.g. CCCc.

If in some way, you do not meet the minimum requirements, you should still apply to the CAO. And then later on, when the results come out, send a covering letter to TCD (not the CAO), explaining circumstances and begging for a place.


*** Here are some ideas on some of the more important differences between TCD and the English unis…:

1) Trinity is smack in the middle of a congested capital, with all the benefits and disadvantage that brings. It is unusual in having a strong campus life (very contained and inward looking campus), and yet in the heart of the city. Not like e.g. Imperial or UCL in having a few sprawling buildings with public roads running through them

2) TCD undergrad degree courses are generally 4-year courses; all other undergrad courses in Ireland are 3 years, like in England. TCD is afforded that luxury in order to gives its students a deeper and broader education. The “broad curriculum” make it resemble more a Canadian or US university than others in the British Isles. There is maybe more the possibility generally to chop and change courses at TCD than elsewhere… might be useful if not too sure what you want to do (careful: if you change degree title, fees can jump).

3) TCD is, it seems, less afraid to fail students if they don’t meet a III. A II.1 still seems to mean a II.1, not that you have to be a genius to get it, but you will need to work. Irish unis are financed differently than in England, and retention and fees are not so linked.

4) Accommodation is not guaranteed to first years, but very likely if living far from TCD. Be careful to follow instructions carefully and early. First years (“Junior Freshmen) live in a leafy suburb a 40m walk away, 15m tram ride. Hall rents from EUR 4400 pa 40 weeks all extras included. In College accommodation from EUR 4000 to much higher. This is dear... rents in the private sector are likely lower on the whole. If you search well and early, you might a similar quality room close to TCD for a bit less.

6) Student composition is very mixed. Less Dublin than other Dublin unis. More international than other Irish unis. There is a large affirmative action program, much larger than just about anywhere else I’ve seen. Up to 15% of all places are reserved for Irish students from deprived backgrounds (mostly), disabled students or mature students that did not get the opportunity to go to university (so that might amount to 2200 out of 15,000 places… huge!). http://www.tcd.ie/Trinity_Access/access_policy/
There are also significant contingents of Northern Irish, English, Euro continentals, along with Nth Americans, East Asians, and West Africans… all either paying large fees or on scholarships/exchanges.

7) Students in third year are often sent on Erasmus, exchanges, etc, and the quality of the exchange universities is on the whole very high.

8) Quite a number of modest scholarships or awards, given sometimes on peculiar grounds and one big one the Scholarship exams taken by many students in 2nd year, and giving free accommodation etc. (for 5 years!). They are worth checking out.


For more student chat, search through boards.ie. If you do a search in Google and put site:.boards.ie along with your key words like TCD, it will come up with lots.
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?f=468&order=desc
wow!:biggrin:
Reply 12
grovichik
You apply via CAO (Central Admissions Office). It's about £45.


45EURO is the full fee but its only 35EURO before 20th Jan online. So really is quite a bit less than £45.

grovichik
Probably need 4 A levels as most uni's in Ireland require this.


True but 3As and and an A at AS is 510 points which was this years cutoff it seems. It is cutting it fine though and you will have to check the list of unacceptable subjects (General Studies, PE etc)
edit: I've seen you're subjects and think they are all accepted only problem would be your max is 510 assuming you got an A in geog.
Reply 13
Hey, I'm hoping to apply to TCD this year, but I know nothing about the system. It's always so hard grappling with a system you don't know.

If I give up an a level, then I'll hopefully have AAAa (a being at AS), so that's 510 points, right?. Otherwise if I keep on going with History, I should get AAAA, or 600 points? Can anyone from Ireland (or who knows about this) tell me how likely I would be to get in on 510/600 points. Is it like here where AAAA hardly means anything anymore, or are you like basically guaranteed to get in with 600? What about 510?

I hope to read Philosophy by the way

Thanks loadssss for any help

Peace and Love xxxxx
Reply 14
Can I ask, are English students who apply to Trinity applicable for English student loans? Is there some sort of support system?

And Yogiboy that was a brilliant post!


(Edit: Sorry, I realise it might be the wrong place to ask, I came straight here from google and didn't look at the forum :-/)
If you apply to Trinity by 31st Jan ,when can you expect to hear from them? Does anyone know.Thanks
bj_945
Thanks loadssss for any help


yeah, the system's purely mathematical, in the main, so if those points are above the cut off this year you WILL get in. 510 is above the norm for english I think.

everhopeful
If you apply to Trinity by 31st Jan ,when can you expect to hear from them? Does anyone know.Thanks


Eh, in August, when the CAO points come out, all offers will be made then. You can have a firm on UCAS and then withdraw your application if you get into Trinity though.
Original post by Hooriya Qazal
yeah first you dont need to apply through UCAS..and yes it is possible to have 5 on UCAS..and this one..there is a different route for it which is available on the site ..what course exactly do you want to apply for?..undergrads?..post grad??..it depends on the subjects you have taken there is a certain number of points you need to reach..so if you can let me know i can help you out..
is www.tcd.ie


Looking to do an undergrad degree in Spanish and English Lit, having taken 3 Alevels + an AS. Thanks tons

Quick Reply