username5397810
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Studying for nearly 6 years only to go into really difficult training. (Leaving the pay progression aside) How satisfying is medicine exactly? Anyone who is currently a junior doctor or doctor, do you think sacrificing your youth working hard all the time was worth it? Is it a career that is overhyped or underappreciated? Do you wish you did something else?
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Democracy
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(Original post by amybum)
Studying for nearly 6 years only to go into really difficult training. (Leaving the pay progression aside) How satisfying is medicine exactly? Anyone who is currently a junior doctor or doctor, do you think sacrificing your youth working hard all the time was worth it? Is it a career that is overhyped or underappreciated? Do you wish you did something else?
Most of the time it's very satisfying. No regrets. Underappreciated in some circles yes.
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ecolier
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(Original post by amybum)
Studying for nearly 6 years only to go into really difficult training. (Leaving the pay progression aside) How satisfying is medicine exactly? Anyone who is currently a junior doctor or doctor, do you think sacrificing your youth working hard all the time was worth it? Is it a career that is overhyped or underappreciated? Do you wish you did something else?
It is satisfying, most of the time.

Yes to all the other questions.
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Iffyiffy
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Yes it is satisfying and enjoyable(and I’ve just finished nights!), and there’s always something to learn/get more experience of, which I enjoy.

There’s always rubbish days where you feel underpaid and unappreciated but I wouldn’t do anything else. I leave on time more regularly than my sister who has a finance job!
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SkyKnight
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Not a Dr (third year GEM student), but I wouldn't say it's worth it.

If I could turn back the clock, I would have tried harder to find a job in law/literally any other field
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nexttime
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I don't think there are exactly lots of professional careers which you can work in without "sacrificing your youth". In fact given that the NHS is very lenient on things like taking years out of work, arguably it's better from that perspective.

If you just mean you work harder whilst at uni.. yeah a bit but you also get some really interesting opportunities too and you definitely can make good amounts of free time so I wouldn't worry too much about that.
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Nickita
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From the perspective of someone now applying for medicine as a mature post-grad with a masters and a child, I would suggest that the idea of "sacrificing your youth" is a bit of an odd one. You are going to age, whatever you are doing, the key question is whether medicine is something you really wholeheartedly want to do, in which case not doing it is sacrificing your youth not pursuing your passion. I always wanted to do medicine but some very personal circumstances prevented me from doing it until now, I would rather have sacrificed the youth that I had pining for the career that I really wanted to be doing.
But then as I say, I am an applicant (granted a qualified nurse with 5 years experience) so there may be an element of rose-tinted glasses to my thoughts on this.
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