TC123451
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The application deadline for PhD's in my subject for the next academic year (starting sep 2021) are in January 2020. Im starting an MSc this September. How will the uni judge me if I will have done barely any of my masters before they make a judgement on me?

I only got a 2.1 in my Bsc as well and was looking to focus more and get a distinction in my Msc to make up for it. What are my chances of getting accepted for the PhD? Considering they'll surely have to judge me based on my application before I get the chance to do well at my Msc. (physics at Notts btw)
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mnot
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(Original post by TC123451)
The application deadline for PhD's in my subject for the next academic year (starting sep 2021) are in January 2020. Im starting an MSc this September. How will the uni judge me if I will have done barely any of my masters before they make a judgement on me?

I only got a 2.1 in my Bsc as well and was looking to focus more and get a distinction in my Msc to make up for it. What are my chances of getting accepted for the PhD? Considering they'll surely have to judge me based on my application before I get the chance to do well at my Msc. (physics at Notts btw)
Getting a PhD.
Do you need funding because this is far more competitive then getting accepted if you are paying fees, expenses and living costs all out of pocket.

A PhD application requires a formal admin application with a cover letter, CV, full academic history, 2 references...
But you also will need to network a bit, i.e. speak to senior researchers in your field, find people who are interested in pursuing projects with you.

Their are a few different PhD routes.
-Studentship, a supervisor who has a project in mind and you work with them on it
-Research proposal, you have an idea and work with an academic to find a project that would be novel and useful to all parties
-Doctoral training scheme, which have a 9 month training path in a specific field, followed by 3.25 years research on a PhD proposal.
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TC123451
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(Original post by mnot)
Getting a PhD.
Do you need funding because this is far more competitive then getting accepted if you are paying fees, expenses and living costs all out of pocket.

A PhD application requires a formal admin application with a cover letter, CV, full academic history, 2 references...
But you also will need to network a bit, i.e. speak to senior researchers in your field, find people who are interested in pursuing projects with you.

Their are a few different PhD routes.
-Studentship, a supervisor who has a project in mind and you work with them on it
-Research proposal, you have an idea and work with an academic to find a project that would be novel and useful to all parties
-Doctoral training scheme, which have a 9 month training path in a specific field, followed by 3.25 years research on a PhD proposal.
In terms of funding I won't need to get it from the university so that's a bonus. So how would they manage to take my MSc into account if they assess the applications in January? Do they give me a conditional offer or something based on my results for it? Im not even sure what my chances would be to be honest even considering I don't need funding with a 2.1.
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mnot
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(Original post by TC123451)
In terms of funding I won't need to get it from the university so that's a bonus. So how would they manage to take my MSc into account if they assess the applications in January? Do they give me a conditional offer or something based on my results for it? Im not even sure what my chances would be to be honest even considering I don't need funding with a 2.1.
They can do what they want.
But yes they would definitely take your MSc into account especially given you only have a 2.1.

I applied at roughly the same point a couple years ago. I got an unconditional offer, but I had very strong academics. I think with a 2.1 they would want to see a distinction or merit at masters level.

What are your chances? its really hard to say. It depends on what topic you want to pursue, if you are very passionate about your field, can you demonstrate this, what are potential supervisors looking for...

If you are willing to network around, and you perform well on the masters, given you are self-funding I think you probably have a very decent shot.
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QuentinM
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(Original post by TC123451)
The application deadline for PhD's in my subject for the next academic year (starting sep 2021) are in January 2020. Im starting an MSc this September. How will the uni judge me if I will have done barely any of my masters before they make a judgement on me?

I only got a 2.1 in my Bsc as well and was looking to focus more and get a distinction in my Msc to make up for it. What are my chances of getting accepted for the PhD? Considering they'll surely have to judge me based on my application before I get the chance to do well at my Msc. (physics at Notts btw)
I was in a similar boat a while back-I chose not to apply for PhD's with January deadlines right in the middle of my Masters, as did most of the people on my course, because at that point we had nothing to show. In the end I didn't really focus on PhD applications until after my Masters graduation so they could at least see my grade.

What course are you hoping to study? In my experience if you aren't confident about your academics, try and lean on your experience, because experience is a big deal in my field (biology, though this would likely apply to most science and other subjects). The main reason I'm on the PhD I'm on right now is because I worked in a nearby lab to the one I've now joined, and have experience in most techniques I'm likely to use. Did you do a placement year? Did you ever do a summer research project?

Given how many PhD's I've seen during my time applying (again this may be in a different field to you), most required a masters or expected a lot of experience, that I endeavoured to develop during a Masters. The main people I know without a Masters who are currently on a PhD have considerable experience in the research they are doing now before starting. So if you think you have reasonable experience, it may be worth going for it-if not, focus on your Masters, see if any applications open up in the spring, if not consider applying in a "gap year"
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Helloworld_95
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PhDs are recruited on a rolling basis so I wouldn't worry too much about timing unless there are scholarships involved which require applying at a certain time. Most of the people I know who applied for PhDs didn't put in their application for the one they got until the spring semester.
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