University of Birmingham has 11 Nobel prize winners so why pple saying **** about it?

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gabriel001
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Bham has 11 Nobel prize winners, 5 of whom actually studied in the university which reflects of the quality of education there, 2 of which were actually Nobel peace prize awards so it reflects diversity. It ranks well both in international ranking and in fact very good generally in the general section of the CUG league table, easily with the top 12 every year. So why people always talking **** about it?
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シャチ69
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(Original post by gabriel001)
Bham has 11 Nobel prize winners, 5 of whom actually studied in the university which reflects of the quality of education there, 2 of which were actually Nobel peace prize awards so it reflects diversity. It ranks well both in international ranking and in fact very good generally in the general section of the CUG league table, easily with the top 12 every year. So why people always talking **** about it?
Because it's depressingly mediocre, if you want to count the number of Nobel prize winners, Oxbridge, UCL and Uni of Manchester beats it by a mile (UOM has the most active teaching staff that won a Nobel prize in the country). If you want to compare the beauty of the city, Bristol, Edinburgh and Leeds are far more beautiful compared to Birmingham. It's not a bad Uni, it's a good uni but it's just depressingly mediocre.
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gabriel001
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(Original post by シャチ69)
Because it's depressingly mediocre, if you want to count the number of Nobel prize winners, Oxbridge, UCL and Uni of Manchester beats it by a mile (UOM has the most active teaching staff that won a Nobel prize in the country). If you want to compare the beauty of the city, Bristol, Edinburgh and Leeds are far more beautiful compared to Birmingham. It's not a bad Uni, it's a good uni but it's just depressingly mediocre.
Can you hear yourself. How can something be good and "depressingly mediocre" at the same time. Why you have to compare with the extremity of a singular factor rather than the mix of everything, which is what counts. It's your mind that is depressingly mediocre when you speak like a 9 year old. Go look for the kid's section ok?
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Sinnoh
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I wasn't aware that people were talking **** about it.
Also Birmingham is a very large university, of course it will have a fair few Nobel laureates.
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Charlie101998
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(Original post by gabriel001)
Can you hear yourself. How can something be good and "depressingly mediocre" at the same time. Why you have to compare with the extremity of a singular factor rather than the mix of everything, which is what counts. It's your mind that is depressingly mediocre when you speak like a 9 year old. Go look for the kid's section ok?
Sounds like someone hit a nerve by disputing the quality of the University. Are you a student there by chance?
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15Characters...
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I wasn't really aware that Birmingham was looked down like that. Birmingham is a good uni. It does a lot of good research and provides a good education to its students, like many other British institutions. Admittedly Birmingham has a fairly grim campus, and is not the nicest city, but this is true for most UK unis in my opinion :laugh:. I applied to Birmingham for my PhD precisely because they have an active and respected research group in my field.

I don't however think the number of Nobel laureates means a huge amount on its own. Most world leading research does not win a Nobel (in some fields there isn't a relevant prize anyway), so Nobel count is not necessarily a great way to compare research between institutions. Furthermore, even at universities with high Nobel counts, the vast majority of research groups will have no Nobel laureates so you cannot really draw conclusions about the university overall. I think all a Nobel indicates is the presence of one particular individual who did important research at some point in their career, possibly whilst they were at a different institution and collaborating with people elsewhere.

And strength of research does not always translate into teaching success anyway; many highly successful researchers are "naturally" poor teachers and supervisors or deliberately put minimal effort into these tasks in order to focus on their research.
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シャチ69
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(Original post by gabriel001)
Can you hear yourself. How can something be good and "depressingly mediocre" at the same time. Why you have to compare with the extremity of a singular factor rather than the mix of everything, which is what counts. It's your mind that is depressingly mediocre when you speak like a 9 year old. Go look for the kid's section ok?
Lmao, I simply used a factor that you used. I'm just saying that Birmingham uni is mediocre in terms of its number of Nobel laureates as well as the city it's situated in and it's rankings. Nonetheless it's still a good uni because it's teachings are alright and still delivers a certified good degree at the end of you studies.
Still there's no need to be all bi*chy if your feelings were hurt lol.
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Napp
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(Original post by gabriel001)
Can you hear yourself. How can something be good and "depressingly mediocre" at the same time. Why you have to compare with the extremity of a singular factor rather than the mix of everything, which is what counts. It's your mind that is depressingly mediocre when you speak like a 9 year old. Go look for the kid's section ok?
What's really amusing is how personally you seem to take someones views on a university. Chill out.
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weepinbell
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(Original post by シャチ69)
Because it's depressingly mediocre, if you want to count the number of Nobel prize winners, Oxbridge, UCL and Uni of Manchester beats it by a mile (UOM has the most active teaching staff that won a Nobel prize in the country). If you want to compare the beauty of the city, Bristol, Edinburgh and Leeds are far more beautiful compared to Birmingham. It's not a bad Uni, it's a good uni but it's just depressingly mediocre.
11 Nobel Prize winners still puts it in the top 10 in the country on that measure (out of ~130 universities). As of this moment in time, it is only beaten by Oxbridge (obviously, it's Oxbridge), UCL (33), Manchester (25), Edinburgh (19), LSE (18), Imperial (14) and Kings (12) - so that puts Birmingham on 9th in the country (and top 60 globally) by Nobel Laureate count (Bristol claims to have 13 but only 9 of them are actually held by academics).

I don't exactly know what you mean when you call Birmingham 'depressingly mediocre', given it's placed in the upper half of the Russell Group and the top 7% of the country (9th out of ~130). Of course there's more to a university's reputation than this, but this is the metric you've decided to attack it from. How does a university being in a city you don't like mean it's mediocre?
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weepinbell
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Nobel laureates aren't a perfect measure of a university's quality, but there's no denying the correlation is strong.

Oxbridge/Imperial/LSE/UCL/KCL/Edinburgh/Manchester/Birmingham/Bristol all have a strong natural reputation - i.e. well-financed, strong history, strong alumni, strong research, large contribution to society through discoveries/inventions, lots of prestigious prizes attached to them, generally high grades are needed to get in etc. That takes a lot to undo, and dropping in the league tables isn't going to harm them much - I think of those universities as being in the natural top 10, if you like. If league tables never existed and hadn't inflated the reputation of certain universities, that's probably what most people would otherwise think of as the 10 or so best universities in the country (and I think this was roughly the view, before league tables started in the 1990s).

Reputation is difficult to quantify but if you look at a range of tables and data (global rankings, employability, prizes, endowment etc.) - you tend to notice a pattern of Oxbridge first, followed by Imperial/LSE/UCL/Kings (golden triangle) plus Edinburgh (global top 50), and then you get places like Manchester/Bristol/Birmingham bubbling under. That seems about right to me, if we're taking a comprehensive range of factors into account.

I don't really care if say, Bath, or even St Andrews, beat most of those in entry tariffs, or if they're trendier amongst current sixth formers because they 'seem posher' - that's a load of rubbish. They may beat some of those in some aspects (such competitive entry), but in order to truly compete with those, they have to beat them in a range of aspects rather than just a few.
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