Joining single carriageway

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vivkulh
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I haven't found it even after an hour of searching on internet.

To join dual carriageway, we have to signal right. Is it also the case while joining the single carriageway? or should we use left signal for it. Or does it depend on the type of the central line on single carriageway? Thank you!
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Admit-One
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Why would you be indicating left to join a carriageway on your right?

Do you have a diagram or photo of the road layout you're describing?
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dj_ad_1
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It would be easier if you give us a image (screenshot of google maps).
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vivkulh
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(Original post by Admit-One)
Why would you be indicating left to join a carriageway on your right?

Do you have a diagram or photo of the road layout you're describing?
It is a general question about joining a carriageway to left. If there is a carriageway with national speed limit that we want to join on left, should we give left signal (as I am comparing it with dual carraigeway where we have to give right signal, I didn't get why we give right signal for it). Thanks!

Also, is it possible to join the single carriageway to the right? (maybe when the central line is broken right?)
Last edited by vivkulh; 1 week ago
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Admit-One
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(Original post by vivkulh)
It is a general question about joining a carriageway to left. If there is a carriageway with national speed limit that we want to join on left, should we give left signal (as I am comparing it with dual carraigeway where we have to give right signal, I didn't get why we give right signal for it). Thanks!

Also, is it possible to join the single carriageway to the right? (maybe when the central line is broken right?)
I can't think of a situation where you would join a carriageway on the left hand side of the car.

I think you are muddling turning left onto and road and merging onto a carriageway or motorway via a slip road, (where you are signaling right to tell drivers that you are entering their lane).

Is this a layout that you have seen somewhere or is it purely hypothetical?
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TheMcSame
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It is very rare to come across a single carriageway with a dual carriageway-like merge.

I'd also question the need to signal for merging onto a dual carriageway anyway seeing as there's only one direction you can be going, we don't signal for merging in turn after all. And, unless it's compulsory as per DVSA standards, I'd very much avoid doing, if you need to get straight over to be in a certain lane (I.E Coming off the M6 Toll at T8 for the A460, you need to get in the right lane at the roundabout, which is relatively close to the junction, to continue following the A460), indicating from merge to lane change could be interpreted as accidentally leaving your indicator on and cause a tad of temporary confusion.

(Original post by vivkulh)
It is a general question about joining a carriageway to left. If there is a carriageway with national speed limit that we want to join on left, should we give left signal (as I am comparing it with dual carraigeway where we have to give right signal, I didn't get why we give right signal for it). Thanks!

Also, is it possible to join the single carriageway to the right? (maybe when the central line is broken right?)
Think you can give us a quick drawing of what you're trying to describe? Is it something like this one on the right?

Image

If so, you'd never have that on a single carriageway, it'd always be built as a regular junction (either give way or stop). You'd only see that design as a merge on a dual carriageway, even then, I don't believe they're particularly common, if used at all. Though I suppose there's an oddball, one-way street somewhere that says otherwise. But I'm assuming we're talking about a road with two directions of flow as opposed to a one-way road.

Or are you talking about merging from the right, but signaling left to show you're going to stay in the left lane? Which, if that is the case, only if you're turning off.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 1 week ago
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vivkulh
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(Original post by TheMcSame)
It is very rare to come across a single carriageway with a dual carriageway-like merge.
Think you can give us a quick drawing of what you're trying to describe? Is it something like this one on the right?

Image
Wow, that's a really good visualization. Thanks for the elaborate answer!
As you guessed, I was talking about the second case. Now it is clear that the single-carriageway is always a regular junction (either give way or stop), rather than some merging type junction.
Does it also mean we can emerge right on to the single carriageway (as there is no central reservation).
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TheMcSame
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(Original post by vivkulh)
Does it also mean we can emerge right on to the single carriageway (as there is no central reservation).
So much like that example but with a slip-road of sorts coming in from the left?

I mean, there's nothing about the theory that says it couldn't be done. But in practice, it's pretty unusual to have different single carriageway roads that merge like a sliproad onto a dual carriageway. The only time I've seen single carriageway roads merge like that in any sort of similar fashion is when you've got a road that essentially runs alongside and turns off after a short distance.

A pretty clear example I know of would be where the A38 and A516 meet in Derby, it's a dual carriageway but it shows the general idea of what I'm talking about. The A516 and A38 are joined, with 2 lanes for the A38 and 1 for the A516 on the far left which joins into it's own lane, then turns off a short distance down the road.

You do occasionally get things like that on single carriageway roads, for example, there's one in Mansfield where Walkden Street meets Quaker Way, but the far left lane is more for going straight around to Union Street rather than merging onto Quaker way. Though this is also a one-way system, not a dual flow road.

If I've again got the right idea in my head, I'd suspect you'd struggle to find an example of something like that on a dual flow, single carriageway outside of a city or town. Though I'd suspect their purpose is for traffic flow entirely rather than merging onto another road.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 1 week ago
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by vivkulh)
I haven't found it even after an hour of searching on internet.

To join dual carriageway, we have to signal right. Is it also the case while joining the single carriageway? or should we use left signal for it. Or does it depend on the type of the central line on single carriageway? Thank you!
It depends whether it's an acceleration lane, or a junction.
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parmezanne
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(Original post by TheMcSame)
Image
the drawing....

i can seriously appreciate the effort!!
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vivkulh
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(Original post by TheMcSame)
A pretty clear example I know of would be where the A38 and A516 meet in Derby, it's a dual carriageway but it shows the general idea of what I'm talking about. The A516 and A38 are joined, with 2 lanes for the A38 and 1 for the A516 on the far left which joins into it's own lane, then turns off a short distance down the road.
Thanks for the examples, it was really helpful.
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