Hazadd
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Let me just begin by saying that I know that you should never enter a field for money but I feel money is always a factor hence why I am asking.


we all know that nurses can earn a decent amount however the academic requirment is not as high or as long time wise as Medicine or dentistry so I really only want to compare doctors,surgeons and dentists.


Generally speaking , is there more money to be made by going into medical research/tropical disease research than if you were to spend the time becoming a doctor/surgeon or dentist?


I am really considering going into research instead of actual medical practise (I wanted to be a neurosurgeon) but only if the money is right (I am 9:1 job to money ratio and I love the idea of both research and practise but I do need a job that pays me well ofcouse lol)
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ecolier
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(Original post by Hazadd)
Let me just begin by saying that I know that you should never enter a field for money but I feel money is always a factor hence why I am asking.


we all know that nurses can earn a decent amount however the academic requirment is not as high or as long time wise as Medicine or dentistry so I really only want to compare doctors,surgeons and dentists.


Generally speaking , is there more money to be made by going into medical research/tropical disease research than if you were to spend the time becoming a doctor/surgeon or dentist?


I am really considering going into research instead of actual medical practise (I wanted to be a neurosurgeon) but only if the money is right (I am 9:1 job to money ratio and I love the idea of both research and practise but I do need a job that pays me well ofcouse lol)
Clinical medicine unless you are a top world-renowned researcher in your field.

The average clinical doctor / dentist will earn more than the average researcher.

You can always top-up clinical work with research if that's your interest.
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Hazadd
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(Original post by ecolier)
Clinical medicine unless you are a top world-renowned researcher in your field.

The average clinical doctor / dentist will earn more than the average researcher.

You can always top-up clinical work with research if that's your interest.
would you say a Pathologist is a good mix of the two or is that something different all together?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Hazadd)
would you say a Pathologist is a good mix of the two or is that something different all together?
Pathologists are still clinical doctors, they can choose to focus on medical work or research like every other field.

There are opportunities to participate in research in virtually every single medical / surgical specialty.

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...tors/pathology
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Hazadd
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(Original post by ecolier)
Pathologists are still clinical doctors, they can choose to focus on medical work or research like every other field.

There are opportunities to participate in research in virtually every single medical / surgical specialty.

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...tors/pathology
I feel that just getting a medicine degree is the best bet here, I feel that getting a biomedical degree only to end up on 40k at best for the next 20 years is a bit pointless.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Hazadd)
Let me just begin by saying that I know that you should never enter a field for money but I feel money is always a factor hence why I am asking.


we all know that nurses can earn a decent amount however the academic requirment is not as high or as long time wise as Medicine or dentistry so I really only want to compare doctors,surgeons and dentists.


Generally speaking , is there more money to be made by going into medical research/tropical disease research than if you were to spend the time becoming a doctor/surgeon or dentist?


I am really considering going into research instead of actual medical practise (I wanted to be a neurosurgeon) but only if the money is right (I am 9:1 job to money ratio and I love the idea of both research and practise but I do need a job that pays me well ofcouse lol)
Academia isn't particularly lucrative in any profession. Even if it were, I'm not sure tropical medicine research is where the money is at - they're called neglected diseases for a reason.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Hazadd)
Let me just begin by saying that I know that you should never enter a field for money but I feel money is always a factor hence why I am asking.


we all know that nurses can earn a decent amount however the academic requirment is not as high or as long time wise as Medicine or dentistry so I really only want to compare doctors,surgeons and dentists.


Generally speaking , is there more money to be made by going into medical research/tropical disease research than if you were to spend the time becoming a doctor/surgeon or dentist?


I am really considering going into research instead of actual medical practise (I wanted to be a neurosurgeon) but only if the money is right (I am 9:1 job to money ratio and I love the idea of both research and practise but I do need a job that pays me well ofcouse lol)
Yeah as above. Research is paid very very poorly considering the impact they have on the world (almost certainly more than any clinical doctor). Average pay for a postdoc is £31k, and working your way up to higher pay scales is actually very competitive.

And yes, tropical diseases is particularly poorly funded given it, you know, affects poor countries. Outside of Oxford and LSTHM very little research is done in that area at all. But even if you pick a lucrative area (breast cancer is possibly the most lucrative out there) the researchers themselves don't get paid much.
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KelsieTaylor
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(Original post by nexttime)
And yes, tropical diseases is particularly poorly funded given it, you know, affects poor countries. Outside of Oxford and LSTHM very little research is done in that area at all. But even if you pick a lucrative area (breast cancer is possibly the most lucrative out there) the researchers themselves don't get paid much.
I didn't know that, but it is kind of sad seeing as they do life-changing work.
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by ecolier)
Pathologists are still clinical doctors, they can choose to focus on medical work or research like every other field.

There are opportunities to participate in research in virtually every single medical / surgical specialty.

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...tors/pathology
Can vouch for this in dentistry too. A lot of the dental clinicians who teach us are also involved in research - and quite a few have published works in Cochrane etc.
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Hazadd
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well this has been very eye opening, I use to think that medical researchers would get paid a whole lot more considering they literally discover and create cures.Even though I would love to become a medical researcher/scienctist,31K is a horrendous mid career salary for a medical field.I think that becoming a pathologist is the best mix between research and clinical work that pays well.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Hazadd)
well this has been very eye opening, I use to think that medical researchers would get paid a whole lot more considering they literally discover and create cures.Even though I would love to become a medical researcher/scienctist,31K is a horrendous mid career salary for a medical field.I think that becoming a pathologist is the best mix between research and clinical work that pays well.
I don't see why you seem to think pathology is any more research orientated than any other medical field - is it because it involves microscopes lol? But sure doctors commonly do research and as long as you are wanting the bulk of your career to be looking after sick patients and their families, not research, then being a doctor with research interests is an option.
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xsowmix
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(Original post by Hazadd)
well this has been very eye opening, I use to think that medical researchers would get paid a whole lot more considering they literally discover and create cures.Even though I would love to become a medical researcher/scienctist,31K is a horrendous mid career salary for a medical field.I think that becoming a pathologist is the best mix between research and clinical work that pays well.
Pathology doesn't really have research (It's more looking at samples and tests and giving their take on the diagnosis on the patient depending on what they have seen). Pathologists have very little direct patient contact if that's what you are looking for. Tbh there are some doctors who take up clinical research as a side thing.
ecolier pls do correct me if I'm wrong
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Hazadd
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(Original post by xsowmix)
Pathology doesn't really have research (It's more looking at samples and tests and giving their take on the diagnosis on the patient depending on what they have seen). Pathologists have very little direct patient contact if that's what you are looking for. Tbh there are some doctors who take up clinical research as a side thing.
ecolier pls do correct me if I'm wrong
to be honest, I would like little contact with patients so you gave me another reason to enter the field lol.
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Chief Wiggum
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Basically, the average clinician will earn more than the average researcher. But if you are at the top of the research world (in reality, I imagine very few people reach that level), then I imagine that would be very lucrative.
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by xsowmix)
Pathology doesn't really have research (It's more looking at samples and tests and giving their take on the diagnosis on the patient depending on what they have seen). Pathologists have very little direct patient contact if that's what you are looking for. Tbh there are some doctors who take up clinical research as a side thing.
ecolier pls do correct me if I'm wrong
Pathologists can certainly do research. I imagine Pathology is quite an academic specialty.
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Democracy
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(Original post by xsowmix)
Pathology doesn't really have research (It's more looking at samples and tests and giving their take on the diagnosis on the patient depending on what they have seen). Pathologists have very little direct patient contact if that's what you are looking for. Tbh there are some doctors who take up clinical research as a side thing.
ecolier pls do correct me if I'm wrong
Lol wut? There is tonnes of research in pathology. Molecular pathology is a huge and emerging field.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Hazadd)
to be honest, I would like little contact with patients so you gave me another reason to enter the field lol.
Why do medicine if you'd prefer minimal patient contact?

As you yourself said you should not be motivated by money... if that's the case, medicine is going to feel woefully inadequate.

Plus, there are plenty of specialties with little patient contact too.
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xsowmix
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(Original post by Democracy)
Lol wut? There is tonnes of research in pathology. Molecular pathology is a huge and emerging field.
(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
Pathologists can certainly do research. I imagine Pathology is quite an academic specialty.
Yes there are many research specialties within pathology but if you choose to just solely focus on pathology work in a hospital, you do very little (if any) research.
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by xsowmix)
Yes there are many research specialties within pathology but if you choose to just solely focus on pathology work in a hospital, you do very little (if any) research.
Well yeah, like literally every other specialty, if a pathologist chooses to focus purely on clinical work, then they won't be doing research.

If a pathologist wants to get involved with research, I would imagine it is a very active field with a lot of academic opportunities.
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xsowmix
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
Well yeah, like literally every other specialty, if a pathologist chooses to focus purely on clinical work, then they won't be doing research.

If a pathologist wants to get involved with research, I would imagine it is a very active field with a lot of academic opportunities.
oh yeh. i don't why i wrote that. yep yep. it does have many research fields, much more than other specialties.
thanks for pointing out my mistake.
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