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Russell Group unis for BSc, MSc and PhD = Success?

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Anonymous #1
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Does the fact that I attended Russell Group unis for all three of my degrees mean that I am a success? Is it admirable, or just the run of the mill?
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artful_lounger
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What is "success"? The answer entirely depends on your definition of that.

To be honest though doing any of your degrees at a "Russell Group" university doesn't necessarily mean anything. The existence of the group (as a postgraduate research consortium, although really just a political lobbying group) has nothing to do with undergraduate teaching, is only barely potentially relevant for masters level work, and for PhD research the uni you do your PhD at means nothing compared to who your supervisor is and/or which research group you do your work in (possibly at the broadest level the department you do your PhD in compared to other departments in the same area at other unis, but that is kind of a bit too vague even then).

So if you're defining success by "doing degrees at RG unis" then it's really just...besides the point. What you do with the experience matters more than where you got the degrees (or what you got them in). If you enjoyed the process of earning those degrees at those unis and are happy with what you end up using them to do afterwards, then that seems to be a success to me. If you're just trying to tick boxes in some imaginary competition of who "wins" by being the most successful, then I wouldn't really rate you as a successful human being in the first place...
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 month ago
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Ki Yung Na
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Not at all. Could be achieved by next man.

Outside of student circles and school circles and academic circle or journalism circles. The idea of Russel group mean very little.

Leicester is a red brick and it’s not in the Russel group. But being a “uni of” in the old fashion sense. It has a value for it.

That’s just an example of how, the term Russel group is limited in provision.

But statistically, if you have done all three levels at this level of institution (politically at least), it does mean that you might have a more sound chance of success.

(Success is so subjective though. For some university in itself is a success, for others, university is an expectation, and for some doing all three levels is impressive, for others it’s a choice a person makes that shows what they value or want to value)

Generally, I would say you are a success, but not any more than any other student who’s passed or received a qualification for being a student. If that makes sense?
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StDave
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Since you mentioned Russell Group, I assume you're not at one of the few elite universities (Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial).

In this case, no, it alone does not mean you'll be more successful than anyone else. In fact, for me, if you mentioned it in an application, it would put me off employing you. Choosing a university purely for its RG label (without considering other, maybe better universities for your subject), would display a certain lack of imagination and an inability to do your own critical research.

What would count in your favour is if your RG universities are genuinely good in your subject, with a history of churning out good quality employable graduates.

It's important to gain a network of contacts only available to certain high level academics. Whilst RG is known for research, world leading academics don't just limit themselves to the Russell Group. Loads of universities have staff producing excellent research, just not on the big, university wide, scale. This is where your ability to research and find those staff comes in. It shows you're not just relying on lazy assumptions.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Does the fact that I attended Russell Group unis for all three of my degrees mean that I am a success? Is it admirable, or just the run of the mill?
Did you enjoy it?
Are you happy?
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Ki Yung Na
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Did you enjoy it?
Are you happy?
Lol. All that matters really. Can’t even vote it enough. I should’ve thought of this instead of the wall if text I wrote about my own opinion on the matter.


But yeah, what she/he says.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by StDave)
Since you mentioned Russell Group, I assume you're not at one of the few elite universities (Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial).

In this case, no, it alone does not mean you'll be more successful than anyone else. In fact, for me, if you mentioned it in an application, it would put me off employing you. Choosing a university purely for its RG label (without considering other, maybe better universities for your subject), would display a certain lack of imagination and an inability to do your own critical research.

What would count in your favour is if your RG universities are genuinely good in your subject, with a history of churning out good quality employable graduates.

It's important to gain a network of contacts only available to certain high level academics. Whilst RG is known for research, world leading academics don't just limit themselves to the Russell Group. Loads of universities have staff producing excellent research, just not on the big, university wide, scale. This is where your ability to research and find those staff comes in. It shows you're not just relying on lazy assumptions.
One of them was UCL, and the other two were solid RG universities.
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StDave
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(Original post by Anonymous)
One of them was UCL, and the other two were solid RG universities.
By use of the term 'solid RG universities' you're implying that there are less solid RG universities around. This kinda answers your original question as you phrased it.

Apart from in a few sectors, and London centric organisations, very few people have heard of UCL. Yes is an excellent university, but it doesn't have the immediate name recognition of Oxbridge in the real world.

In terms of success, yes it's good being a graduate from there, but choosing an RG purely for the sake of it being in the RG is nothing to boast about.

It's a bit like only eating apples, whilst refusing touch oranges, because they have an Apple Marketing Board doing their marketing. If you have a vitamin C deficiency, it's crazy to assume an apple is better for you than an orange. That would be a lazy, and wrong, assumption based on membership of a lobby group.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by StDave)
By use of the term 'solid RG universities' you're implying that there are less solid RG universities around. This kinda answers your original question as you phrased it.

Apart from in a few sectors, and London centric organisations, very few people have heard of UCL. Yes is an excellent university, but it doesn't have the immediate name recognition of Oxbridge in the real world.

In terms of success, yes it's good being a graduate from there, but choosing an RG purely for the sake of it being in the RG is nothing to boast about.

It's a bit like only eating apples, whilst refusing touch oranges, because they have an Apple Marketing Board doing their marketing. If you have a vitamin C deficiency, it's crazy to assume an apple is better for you than an orange. That would be a lazy, and wrong, assumption based on membership of a lobby group.
Sour grapes ..... ah well.
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StDave
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Sour grapes ..... ah well.
Sorry, you should have said that you only wanted replies that fit with your preconceptions.

In fact, Im nearing 50 and semi retired. There was no Russell Group when I was in formal education.

Don't be so dismissive of others. It rightly, or wrongly, demonstrates a lack of character, unable to change viewpoint despite arguments to the contrary. Sort of typical of someone who bases their decisions on lazy assumptions.
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V1ct0r
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Jesus Christ...

Success is very relative. You're successful in the eyes of a person who cannot go to university because of financial issues or whatever. But in the eyes of an oxbridge gradute, you're not successful.

If the research that you conducted during your PhD has benefitted the society in some way, then you are successful in my opinion, regardless of if you went to RG or non-RG uni, but this is just my opinion.

But don't chase success for god's' sake. Just try to be happy and satisfied with your life, and don't think about what others will think of you.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Did you enjoy it?
Are you happy?
Assuming you attended Oxford, did it make you happy?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by V1ct0r)
Jesus Christ...

Success is very relative. You're successful in the eyes of a person who cannot go to university because of financial issues or whatever. But in the eyes of an oxbridge gradute, you're not successful.

If the research that you conducted during your PhD has benefitted the society in some way, then you are successful in my opinion, regardless of if you went to RG or non-RG uni, but this is just my opinion.

But don't chase success for god's' sake. Just try to be happy and satisfied with your life, and don't think about what others will think of you.
The fact that I went to RG universities for all my degrees actually may enhance my chances of working at Oxbridge witthin my field.
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous)
The fact that I went to RG universities for all my degrees actually may enhance my chances of working at Oxbridge witthin my field.
Id imagine your thesis, and any papers you've published, and the focus of the research groups you wish to work in will be much more significant then going to a RG. If your department is well regarded in your field that is beneficial but ultimately your personal performance is what's most relevant.

Although I find it hard to believe a PhD graduate would feel the need to ask this question.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by mnot)
Id imagine your thesis, and any papers you've published, and the focus of the research groups you wish to work in will be much more significant then going to a RG. If your department is well regarded in your field that is beneficial but ultimately your personal performance is what's most relevant.

Although I find it hard to believe a PhD graduate would feel the need to ask this question.
I haven't finished the PhD yet.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I haven't finished the PhD yet.
Have you finished your A Levels yet? So sound too insecure to be a real academic.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Have you finished your A Levels yet? So sound too insecure to be a real academic.
What is it with all the negativity? Read the original thread question and my first post again.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
What is it with all the negativity? Read the original thread question and my first post again.
It's not a question a well qualified academic would ask, or need to ask.At least not one that had confidence in their ability.
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gjd800
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Lmao
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V℮rsions
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No it doesn't mean anything in the long run. Your job and research is more important.
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