lunardays
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So I'm currently looking into doing a psychology degree however I'm completely put off by all the statistics and maths part of it. I was wondering if combined courses would have less of it? So for example psychology combined with sociology
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Yazziii
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Many people do psychology with criminology. Ngl the statistics are quite interesting and easy once you get the hang of it. You’ll get a step by step guide so you won’t be left to figure everything out of your own x
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Noodlzzz
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Unlikely.
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wastedcuriosity
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Probably not, because research skills are a pretty big part of psychology, so are likely to be core modules in most of the joint degrees.
I am awful at maths, I barely passed at GCSE, but honestly, the maths part of psychology is one of my favourites. It's just a lot of remembering formulas, and pretty basic maths like mean, median, mode. We also use SPSS to do a lot of the standardised tests/stats
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Nerol
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(Original post by lunardays)
So I'm currently looking into doing a psychology degree however I'm completely put off by all the statistics and maths part of it. I was wondering if combined courses would have less of it? So for example psychology combined with sociology
Hi!

That put me off before I did my degree, too. However, if you want to do a BPS accredited degree, which you will need if you want to go into a career in psychology, research and statistics will still form quite a large part of your degree. Luckily, though, it mostly involves inputting numbers into some software and letting that do all the hard work! It wasn't a terrifying as I thought it would be, honestly! I did Psychology with Counselling and there was still a fair amount of research methods involved.

Hope this helps!
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lunardays
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(Original post by Nerol)
Hi!

That put me off before I did my degree, too. However, if you want to do a BPS accredited degree, which you will need if you want to go into a career in psychology, research and statistics will still form quite a large part of your degree. Luckily, though, it mostly involves inputting numbers into some software and letting that do all the hard work! It wasn't a terrifying as I thought it would be, honestly! I did Psychology with Counselling and there was still a fair amount of research methods involved.

Hope this helps!
Thank you! So would you say it's still interesting and worth studying despite the maths? Because I really am interested in the subject but I'm just not sure :/
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Yazziii
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(Original post by lunardays)
Thank you! So would you say it's still interesting and worth studying despite the maths? Because I really am interested in the subject but I'm just not sure :/
Very interesting
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bones-mccoy
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Any idea what you want to do after graduation? If you want become any sort of psychologist then there's no way you can avoid statistics or research methods, they form an integral part of every degree, MSc, doctorate and job role
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lunardays
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(Original post by bones-mccoy)
Any idea what you want to do after graduation? If you want become any sort of psychologist then there's no way you can avoid statistics or research methods, they form an integral part of every degree, MSc, doctorate and job role
I was thinking of going down the route of therapy so treating or helping mental health, not necessarily diagnosing. I'm also not interested in becoming a researcher or anything like that
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marinade
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(Original post by lunardays)
So I'm currently looking into doing a psychology degree however I'm completely put off by all the statistics and maths part of it. I was wondering if combined courses would have less of it? So for example psychology combined with sociology
Sociology has plenty of 'research methods', 'stats' and SPSS in it.

This is a psychology thread so there's possibly going to be a bit of rivalry, but the level is broadly similar - although there will be psychology students saying our stats is hard than yours and a pantomime reply oh not is isn't. There isn't necessarily a social sciences degree where you can 'escape' doing maths and stats.
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Nerol
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(Original post by lunardays)
Thank you! So would you say it's still interesting and worth studying despite the maths? Because I really am interested in the subject but I'm just not sure :/
Definitely! I absolutely loved it. All the statistics and data analysis was my least favourite bit, sure, but it was still a great course and very interested. I've since done a postgraduate qualification in psychological therapies and am planning to do a counselling psychology doctorate next, so it hasn't put me off!
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