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Anonymous #4
#61
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#61
I’m a POC and have had similar situations, I think it’s more prejudice, hence why they become distant once they find out. Even though someone is liberal it doesn’t automatically mean that they are fully it, as some people are just selective with their views.
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RogerOxon
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#62
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(Original post by Compost)
I don't think anyone has a problem with people practising religion in their own time, but expecting children to take part in a religion they may not subscribe to - whether or not their parents do - at the taxpayers' expense - seems unreasonable. Dividing people up by religion at school also reduces understanding in a multicultural society,
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Anonymous #5
#63
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(Original post by Compost)
I don't think anyone has a problem with people practising religion in their own time, but expecting children to take part in a religion they may not subscribe to - whether or not their parents do - at the taxpayers' expense - seems unreasonable. Dividing people up by religion at school also reduces understanding in a multicultural society,
That's the same for anything then teaching children a language they may never speak in the future, teaching children history they may never use in the future. It's just a few classes a week and and it causes no harm to society. If you're so focused on tax payers money you should be focusing on all the money they pay the Queen. Also, your tax payers money is used towards the NHS and other public health sectors I don't think however much you pay is used towards Islamic schools.
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RogerOxon
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#64
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(Original post by PeterRowbotham)
It's unacceptable that someone should judge you based on probabilities. The stats on crime and ethnic minorities shouldn't affect how we should treat BME people.
I can form my opinions on whatever basis I want to. I choose evidence.

My default assumption is that anyone with strong, religious views is not someone that I will enjoy spending time with - which is probably mutual.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 1 week ago
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RogerOxon
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#65
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(Original post by Anonymous)
That's the same for anything then teaching children a language they may never speak in the future, teaching children history they may never use in the future. It's just a few classes a week and and it causes no harm to society. If you're so focused on tax payers money you should be focusing on all the money they pay the Queen. Also, your tax payers money is used towards the NHS and other public health sectors I don't think however much you pay is used towards Islamic schools.
IIRC, the State provides 2/3 of the funding for religious schools.

Why do you want children to be subject to religious indoctrination?

Schools are to teach fact, not present one religion as it. That is indoctrination.
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RogerOxon
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#66
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(Original post by Anonymous)
In Islam, the Niqab is worn mostly to emulate the dress code of some great Muslim females. I can assure you that it isn't a political statement. If you spoke to women who wear Niqab I think you'll find most of them are very kind hearted.
It's not their heart that I'm questioning, although I suspect that many are forced to wear it.

More than half of British Muslims (who I would expect to be moderate) want homosexual acts to be illegal. Is that "kindhearted"?
Last edited by RogerOxon; 1 week ago
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Compost
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#67
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(Original post by Anonymous)
It's just a few classes a week and and it causes no harm to society.
Would you feel the same if you were required to attend a school that taught a religion you did not subscribe to - or expected you to spend 'a few classes a week' studying astrology or tarot cards?
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MalcolmX
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#68
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At university all of us acknowledge that most White English people would not mix with anyone who is not white
That only applies to the ones that are racist idiots.
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RogerOxon
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#69
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(Original post by Anonymous)
The states provides it but the state also provides funding to the Queen and yet you think your tax payers money is going to the Islamic school? Its not indoctrination its a few classes a week stop pushing your agenda. They do the same GCSE'S as everyone else. Psychology is not fact nor is ethics and theology and yet that's still taught with no objection?
What else is funded is completely irrelevant.

The number of classes a week is irrelevant.

As you are well aware, teaching any religion as fact is contentious. Psychology and Ethics aren't, not do they tell you what to think, or attempt to get you to believe without evidence.
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londonmyst
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#70
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
More than half of British Muslims (who I would expect to be moderate) want homosexual acts to be illegal. Is that "kindhearted"?
Do bear in mind that those stats were obtained from a study that involved a limited number of participants and did not include any residents of NI.
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RogerOxon
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#71
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(Original post by Anonymous)
You have no authority or say in how the government chooses to spend tax payers money
The UK is a Democracy. I get to vote. I am actively asked for my opinion, as are all voters.

(Original post by Anonymous)
nor do you fund as much of it as you think you do.
I know exactly how much of it I currently fund - none. I don't live in the UK, or, currently, pay tax there (other than VAT when I visit).

(Original post by Anonymous)
Psychology and Ethics are not fact
Evidence and the accepted conclusions are presented.

(Original post by Anonymous)
and religion is not taught as fact
How many religions does an Islamic school teach?

(Original post by Anonymous)
The classes only being 2 days a weeks is oppose to u saying their indoctrinating students.
Irrelevant.

(Original post by Anonymous)
Also what happened to if you want to debate go in the debate section was no one interested in entertaining you so you've decide to come start debates in other forums?
For someone not interested in discussion, you reply a lot.

I've had enough of your illogic, so I won't reply to you further on this thread. As you're hiding behind anonymous, I, unfortunately can't do the same elsewhere.
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Anonymous #5
#72
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
The UK is a Democracy. I get to vote. I am actively asked for my opinion, as are all voters.


I know exactly how much of it I currently fund - none. I don't live in the UK, or, currently, pay tax there (other than VAT when I visit).


Evidence and the accepted conclusions are presented.


How many religions does an Islamic school teach?


Irrelevant.


For someone not interested in discussion, you reply a lot.

I've had enough of your illogic, so I won't reply to you further on this thread. As you're hiding behind anonymous, I, unfortunately can't do the same elsewhere.
Are you a troll? You don't even live in the UK yet you're taking about public funded schools lol. I'm not illogical, you are. Psychology and Ethics and philosophy are not fact and are still taught yet you have no problem with that. Goodbye back to your debate forum were no one cares to entertain you.
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Compost
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#73
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Psychology and Ethics and philosophy are not fact and are still taught yet you have no problem with that. Goodbye back to your debate forum were no one cares to entertain you.
Philosophy and Ethics are all about looking at ideas, seeing different points of view and discussing the pros and cons - these are important skills to learn. Religion is about accepting facts without proof - that's what faith is.
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Joleee
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#74
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#74
(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm having a debate with some of my friends who are either south asian/black/Muslim. We are debating whether racism exists in the UK. A few anecdotes came up but we can't decide if it is actually racism or if it can be explained otherwise. I'd really like to know your opinions.

1. When I went to university I was speaking to some people who I would consider as very socially liberal and I mentioned that I went to an Islamic school. A few from that group looked around in shock/disgust as though I made a faux pas for mentioning it. Is this racism - these guys went to BLM protests voted remain etc. Was it inappropriate to mention Islamic school - I here people mention Catholic school all the time?

2. One of my friends was at another university where some people were very welcoming. But once they saw him in Islamic dress code and would no longer talk to him. In example 1 and 2 these people are clearly liberals. And perhaps their reaction is because they they associate many things in Islam to be against their liberal and tolerant values. So they weren't trying to cause any offence but but inadvertently did so

3. One of my friends is from a minority ethnic background and he's from Oxford. When he moved to a northern city many people would be nice to him until he started speaking. He Suspects that people were not nice to him because he was well spoken and and an ethnic minority. But my question is is this racism or or would people from the North or places like Essex be like that towards anyone who sounded like they were privileged? Or is it that people don't feel comfortable with certain people being more privileged than them. (I have experienced baristas sometimes are rude once they hear me speak, but they probably loathe anyone whom they assume is privileged and they're job is horrible - I never get this from Europeans/Asians.)

4. At university all of us acknowledge that most White English people would not mix with anyone who is not white. You generally only see Europeans mixing with minority ethnic people. My friends who are female experience this more so. Again is this because people tend to hang around people who they have more in common with or is this down to race. (In my own experience I had some white friends who would talk to me when they were in European groups but would ignore me when they were with their white friends. But sometimes I felt this was a social class thing rather than a race thing because I consider myself working class and I think at uni people are always thinking about keeping up impressions)

5. Last year some of my friends during Extinction Rebellion protests. They felt at though they were not welcome. It is true that most people at these protests were white but in my observation they are generally a 'type' - they only really mix well with their own cliques. I know it's a massive of generalisation but generally you can identify someone by appearance as a typical climate change protester.


Let me know if you've experienced the above and whether you think it's racism or you think it's poor character/classism/inferiority complex

Thanks
are you asking because you want advice or because you want to debate if it’s racist?

1. to answer your question, it’s not inappropriate; is the discussion on where you previously went to school inappropriate? if anything just seems like a boring conversation unless you’re telling a story about what you learned or what happened at school.

2. when they saw him in Islamic dress they stopped talking to him you say. you’re sure that’s the reason for it? there could be a plethora of reasons unrelated to your friend’s dress. i wouldn’t assume anything.

3. coming from a working class neighbourhood and working class family imho it’s not uncommon to be jealous of people who have privilege. i’m guiltily of it myself and it wouldn’t matter your ethnicity. probably not racist.

4. people do tend to hang out with people they have things in common with, but you sure all these you’re seeing are from the UK? i am an international student and can verify international students tend to stick together and home students tend to stick together cuz they have that in common. might be life experience the way friendship groups are made and not race.

5. i’ve never been to a protest so cant help you with that
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Anonymous #3
#75
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#75
(Original post by Compost)
I don't think anyone has a problem with people practising religion in their own time, but expecting children to take part in a religion they may not subscribe to - whether or not their parents do - at the taxpayers' expense - seems unreasonable. Dividing people up by religion at school also reduces understanding in a multicultural society,
Religion isnt a hobby that you practice in your own time lol. its a way of life.
saying that Islam prevents multiculturalism is plain ignorance. Because of people like yourself there is so much hatred and Islamophobia.
furthermore, Islam doesnt promote segregation of any kind. FYI 1500 years ago slavery and racism and segregation was abolished-because of Islam.
you really need to look things up before running your mouth. i think parents have a say where their child goes to until a certain age. if they didnt kids being kids would just skip school ect
point is islam promotes multiculturalism more than any society/culture/religion i know of.
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Anonymous #5
#76
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#76
(Original post by Compost)
Philosophy and Ethics are all about looking at ideas, seeing different points of view and discussing the pros and cons - these are important skills to learn. Religion is about accepting facts without proof - that's what faith is.
No that's what religion is to you. Religion has helped many people with their mental health and gave them strength when they were struggling. If you don't agree with it that's up to you.
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