15m0808
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What is the relationship between △S (total) and solubility?

Also what is the relationship between △enthalpy and stability or thermodynamic feasibility?
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charco
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(Original post by 15m0808)
What is the relationship between △S (total) and solubility?

Also what is the relationship between △enthalpy and stability or thermodynamic feasibility?
The more positive △S (total) the more soluble.

△G = △H - T△S

If △G is negative the process is thermodnamically spontaneous (feasible).
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15m0808
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(Original post by charco)
The more positive △S (total) the more soluble.

△G = △H - T△S

If △G is negative the process is thermodnamically spontaneous (feasible).
Hi, thank you for your help!

Why is it that more positive △S (total), the more soluble it is?

Is it more likely for negative △H to be thermodynamically stable?
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charco
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(Original post by 15m0808)
Hi, thank you for your help!

Why is it that more positive △S (total), the more soluble it is?

Is it more likely for negative △H to be thermodynamically stable?
The second law of thermodynamics tells us that for any process to be spontaneous (feasible) the universal entropy must increase.
To explain this law you need to understand statistical thermodynamics. Things happen because they are overwhelmingly more likely to.
Substances, and hence reactions, are made up of huge numbers of particles and cannot avoid the law of large numbers, i.e. their behaviour is determined statistically.
In the macroscopic world we see the specific state adopted by all of the possible microstates (arrangements of particles and energy), it's just that many microstates produce a similar macrostate.
Consequently, we are overwhelmingly likely to get one of the microstates that are most common. This happens when the entropy (arrangements of energy on particles) is at its greatest.
Check out this video:
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seals2001
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(Original post by 15m0808)
Hi, thank you for your help!

Why is it that more positive △S (total), the more soluble it is?

Is it more likely for negative △H to be thermodynamically stable?
(Original post by charco)
The second law of thermodynamics tells us that for any process to be spontaneous (feasible) the universal entropy must increase.
To explain this law you need to understand statistical thermodynamics. Things happen because they are overwhelmingly more likely to.
Substances, and hence reactions, are made up of huge numbers of particles and cannot avoid the law of large numbers, i.e. their behaviour is determined statistically.
In the macroscopic world we see the specific state adopted by all of the possible microstates (arrangements of particles and energy), it's just that many microstates produce a similar macrostate.
Consequently, we are overwhelmingly likely to get one of the microstates that are most common. This happens when the entropy (arrangements of energy on particles) is at its greatest.
Check out this video:
Such an exceptional teacher :congrats:
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