Wil son515
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Hey,

Just wondering if there are any re-joiners from any of the services on here. Wondering if they could shed some light on how it was for them rejoining the military and what advice on what’s good, timescales to getting back in, what to look out for and the bad?? The good, the bad & the ugly basically lol!

Thanks in advance.
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Kerzen
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Which of the services did you serve in previously and which one are you hoping to join?
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Wil son515
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(Original post by Kerzen)
Which of the services did you serve in previously and which one are you hoping to join?
I was in the Army and now looking to join the RAF.
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the_worrier
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I re-joined the RAF earlier this year after nearly 4 years away. The process is different for each applicant.
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Wil son515
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(Original post by the_worrier)
I re-joined the RAF earlier this year after nearly 4 years away. The process is different for each applicant.
Hey worrier

Thanks for the reply. Realise that it would be different for everyone. What was your process like and any struggles and challenges that you found? Was it difficult to get back into the military mindset. I’ve been out 11 yrs so more of a civi then anything else lol. Has it changed it the time you’ve been away??

Thanks
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the_worrier
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Process was straight forward; still takes time.

In truth it has been a bit strange but i’m glad I did it. Changed? No.
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Ikaruss
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Genuinely interested in people's motivation and rationale for re-joining. Is it down to missing the life and camaraderie, difficulty in adjusting back to civvy street or current and future economic conditions?

Or all of the above?

As I say, it's a genuine interest, I have no agenda. I did 32 and wouldn't conceive of returning, as the mantra 'been there, seen it, done it, got several t-shirts and wrote the book' is particularly true in my case.

A pal who hit 55, left, then re-joined as a Reservist, keeps me in touch with the day to day minutiae of life. He seems bemused that I wouldn't consider returning to the fold. I'm bemused that, with all he tells me, and what I can read for myself on open sites, he even thinks I would be remotely interested. It was what it was, I had a great life, met lifelong friends, lost too many other friends, and retired with my head held high. Move forward, never look back.

Time for the younger generation to have their fun. I have different fish to fry.
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Wil son515
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For me it’s boils down current and future economic state more than anything else. Also having joined up far to young and not having a civi experience and having the grass is greener mentality. Having been in civi st for over a decade whilst trying to better myself ie getting a degree ect has not for me anyway been successful. I personally feel that in the current climate I will not be having any success anytime soon and hoping the mob can hopefully help me with this, if anything I feel like I’m going backwards here in civi st. It is also missing the life, the camaraderie and sense of belonging to something greater whilst trying to make a difference which I have not managed to find since leaving just dead end jobs no prospects no hope for success or the future.
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the_worrier
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I served for 19 years, out just under 4 years, rejoined for 12 which will make me 57. Why? Just couldn’t settle in Civvy St. Not sure why.
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Ikaruss
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Thank you both. Everyone has different circumstances and I really hope you both manage to achieve your ambitions - I'm sure you'll know how to exploit the many opportunities for personal development!

I confess I initially struggled with the rhythm of working outside the wire, but that was principally down to incompetent line managers who couldn't 'do' leadership unless it was written down in a staff manual. Once I took control of my career, moved into a different job where I was a good fit for the organisation and, importantly, it was good for me, the world became a better place. Now I have far more responsibility and influence than I ever did in the RAF, albeit on half the salary, but my new boss benefits from having a happy, confident employee who uses all the leadership, communication and soft skills honed in the military, to maximum effect.
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Wil son515
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See with me I only served for 6 joined as a boy soldier as driver in the army engineers not knowing what I wanted to do and with family history of serving seemed the right thing to do at the time. My time served was good managed to gain promotion to Lance jack with out really in my opinion not taking full advantage of what was on offer wit PD which is a regret. Then got injured only minor with shin splints all being a long time to diagnose and treat the issue which was the turning point for me. Felt like been put the scrap pile, so thought give civi st a try with my rose tinted glasses on.

It’s all personal experience and opinion but, Out here in civi st it’s brutal having achieved a degree out here when I came out with no GCSE’s initially with the mind set that education is king to stand out from the crowd would put me in good stead with my skill set and experience. Unfortunately it is not the case having jumped from job to job in seek of something similar to what had I left. No one is or was looking at me with my skill set when I initially left. With the current climate I feel that it will only begin to get harder. Having now applied for the police several times over the course of time with no avail and managing only to get into the volunteering aspect feel like I’ve hit a dead end with what civi st can offer, Having spent majority of my time served on a Raf camp I liked the feel of the place in comparison to that of a army camp. Personal seemed happier and better treated and looked after. Hence the app to go back into the fold for a better life again and persuit of happiness.

Hence, why I would like to know how ppl journeys have been for them going back into the fold what the recruitment process was like for them as going through now and what it’s like being back in and their experience out in civi st prior to making their decision to join up again???

(Original post by the_worrier)
I served for 19 years, out just under 4 years, rejoined for 12 which will make me 57. Why? Just couldn’t settle in Civvy St. Not sure why.
(Original post by Ikaruss)
Thank you both. Everyone has different circumstances and I really hope you both manage to achieve your ambitions - I'm sure you'll know how to exploit the many opportunities for personal development!

I confess I initially struggled with the rhythm of working outside the wire, but that was principally down to incompetent line managers who couldn't 'do' leadership unless it was written down in a staff manual. Once I took control of my career, moved into a different job where I was a good fit for the organisation and, importantly, it was good for me, the world became a better place. Now I have far more responsibility and influence than I ever did in the RAF, albeit on half the salary, but my new boss benefits from having a happy, confident employee who uses all the leadership, communication and soft skills honed in the military, to maximum effect.
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Ikaruss
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Totally get where you're coming from buddy, and there's absolutely nothing wrong with re-joining if it works for you. However, one day you'll be driving out of the camp gates for the last time again, so maybe you should use your second spell to have fun, enjoy the life and camaraderie but also prepare yourself better for what could be a considerable period working in civvy strasse before retirement. I've done almost 10 years post RAF career, and still have plenty of working years left (mainly to fund the Boss's capital projects).

I believe you're right that the RAF is a more relaxed service than the Army (Check-in not Dig-in ), but retaining total professionalism in what it does, so I'm sure you'll be able to use your personal drive and potential to be the best you can be. Take all the AT and educational opportunities on offer , and try to pcture where you'll be in 10-15 years time. The RAF has just started a journey to 're-imagine' itself (Project ASTRA) , and, if it works, it will form the foundation for a fulfilling and successful career in the service, and beyond. I was always amused at the section in the RAF role careers pages which stated the civilian equivalence jobs. For my former role of WSOp it used to be pretty restrictive eg ROV driver, but I see it has now morphed into 'transferable skills' which (for WSOp) looks far more ambitious (good job RAF_Adam) although erring on the cautious side eg middle management - I know plenty of former WSOps who punch far above this limit. And that's the point, you should never limit yourself to what society expects of you, always reach for the stars.

Good luck and I hope someone on here can give you the relevant gen you asked for (sorry for going off piste!).
Out of interest, what RAF role are you thinking of?

Ikky
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