willsenberg66
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Hey!

So i'm currently 20, coming on 21 in the next few months. I have pretty good GCSE's 3A* 4A 1B 2C with the top grades in Maths Physics and Chem. I got an C in AS maths, due to personal circumstances I totally flopped my A2's i didn't revise as I decided uni wasn't for me, got 3 U's. Ive now worked abroad, travelled and matured alot, and beginning to think I should go to UNI.

from my understanding my options are;

1) Apply on UCAS for a foundation year course

2) Access to higher education course

I want the quickest route possible, with the foundation course, I am just waiting on a reference and then my application is ready to send, although I am now contemplating going down the AHE route instead...

advice would help alot
0
reply
Xarao
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Foundation year and progress onto the main degree. I don't have enough knowledge on AHE courses but it sounds like it's far more difficult to progress from that point forward (but still possible). Whereas, foundation into the main degree is far more seamless and should be less of a hassle for you to be integrated into the course.
0
reply
willsenberg66
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Xarao)
Foundation year and progress onto the main degree. I don't have enough knowledge on AHE courses but it sounds like it's far more difficult to progress from that point forward (but still possible), whereas foundation onto the main degree is far more seamless.
Only thing i'm worried about with the foundation year is that I have not a single level 3 apart from the C in AS Math, are uni's going to turn their noses at me?
0
reply
Xarao
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by willsenberg66)
Only thing i'm worried about with the foundation year is that I have not a single level 3 apart from the C in AS Math, are uni's going to turn their noses at me?
There are some foundation degrees out there with very little to no entry requirements. You'll just have to look out for those, so you will be limited in some way unfortunately.
0
reply
Emily_B
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by willsenberg66)
Only thing i'm worried about with the foundation year is that I have not a single level 3 apart from the C in AS Math, are uni's going to turn their noses at me?
Access courses are a year long (just like foundation year) and gives you the equivalent of 3 A levels. A lot of universities accest them.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by willsenberg66)
Hey!

So i'm currently 20, coming on 21 in the next few months. I have pretty good GCSE's 3A* 4A 1B 2C with the top grades in Maths Physics and Chem. I got an C in AS maths, due to personal circumstances I totally flopped my A2's i didn't revise as I decided uni wasn't for me, got 3 U's. Ive now worked abroad, travelled and matured alot, and beginning to think I should go to UNI.

from my understanding my options are;

1) Apply on UCAS for a foundation year course

2) Access to higher education course

I want the quickest route possible, with the foundation course, I am just waiting on a reference and then my application is ready to send, although I am now contemplating going down the AHE route instead...

advice would help alot
I would definitely go for an Access course.

With foundation years with no A levels, you will be very restricted in the unis that will accept you and you won't be able to get into one of the better unis. However, Access to HE courses are widely respected and you would be able to apply to a much wider range of unis. Also, foundation years cost over £9k in tuition fees (plus accommodation costs if you go to a uni away from home) whereas Access courses are available at local colleges and the fees are much cheaper and refunded if you progress onto uni.

Foundation years also use up one year of your entitlement to student finance which could complicate things for you futher down the line if you ever wanted to switch from one uni to another because you didn't like the course, whereas Access courses don't.
0
reply
willsenberg66
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by harrysbar)
I would definitely go for an Access course.

With foundation years with no A levels, you will be very restricted in the unis that will accept you and you won't be able to get into one of the better unis. However, Access to HE courses are widely respected and you would be able to apply to a much wider range of unis. Also, foundation years cost over £9k in tuition fees (plus accommodation costs if you go to a uni away from home) whereas Access courses are available at local colleges and the fees are much cheaper and refunded if you progress onto uni.

Foundation years also use up one year of your entitlement to student finance which could complicate things for you futher down the line if you ever wanted to switch from one uni to another because you didn't like the course, whereas Access courses don't.
Only thing I'm worried about with the access course is it's already almost October, wouldn't I have missed some of the courses already for this year? Meaning if I started next September, that means I'll be almost 23 when starting my first year at uni :/
0
reply
Emily_B
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by willsenberg66)
Only thing I'm worried about with the access course is it's already almost October, wouldn't I have missed some of the courses already for this year? Meaning if I started next September, that means I'll be almost 23 when starting my first year at uni :/
Yes you may have already missed some but check with local colleges.
Starting uni at 23? I was 25 when I started my nursing degree! Many people I trained with started at 30+! Starting a nursing/midwifery degree later than the standard 18/19 is perfectly normal.
0
reply
Coventry University Student Ambassadors
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
Hi there willsenberg66,

I am currently a second year Primary Education and Teaching Studies student and before enrolling on my degree, I completed an Access to HE in Social Sciences. I was in a very similar situation to yourself and after having a break from education, I chose the Access to HE as I thought it was more suited to my level of education. The course not only taught me the modules linked to Social Sciences, but I was also taught more about study skills so that I was prepared for university. This included reading and comprehension and academic writing.

I would highly recommend taking one as it does prepare you for your future endeavours. I hope this helps and please feel free to ask away with any more questions you may have.

Mel Bunfield - Student Ambassador at CU Scarborough
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

New lockdown - Do you agree schools and universities should remain open?

Yes (54)
36.49%
No (77)
52.03%
I don't know (17)
11.49%

Watched Threads

View All