Landlord refuses to acknowledge the fact that I leave

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Anonymous #1
#1
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Hi there, I want to move out because my landlord increased the price of the rent by 70%.
They refuse to let me go without bringing someone to replace me because I have a contract without a break clause but the contract doesn't say anything about me having to bring someone in and I also gave a 1 month notice to them.
They're also not making any effort to find tenants.
The same thing is happening to my housemate.

What's to be done?
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Kutie Karen
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#2
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If you have a contract, I think you have to see it through. I don't think he can increase the rent either if your contract is fixed for that period.
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alexschmalex
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#3
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Check your contract, most shouldn't give them the ability to increase your rent during your agreed tenancy
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Kutie Karen)
If you have a contract, I think you have to see it through. I don't think he can increase the rent either if your contract is fixed for that period.
I found out not a long time ago that the contract is for the whole property and not for a single room.
Noobie mistake.
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Kutie Karen
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I found out not a long time ago that the contract is for the whole property and not for a single room.
Noobie mistake.
So have you got a copy of the contract and does it say they can increase rent whilst in contract?
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Sammylou40
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If you have a contract then you either have to stay or find a replacement. It’s that simple.
You can’t just give a months notice.
Have someone qualified to check your contract to make sure it’s all legal, especially regarding increases.
If it is, you signed it so you you have to fulfill it
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Kutie Karen
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
If you have a contract then you either have to stay or find a replacement. It’s that simple.
You can’t just give a months notice.
Have someone qualified to check your contract to make sure it’s all legal, especially regarding increases.
If it is, you signed it so you you have to fulfill it
that does sound right to me.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Kutie Karen)
So have you got a copy of the contract and does it say they can increase rent whilst in contract?
Since it's for the whole property it makes sense to raise the rent so that the landlord has the same of money each month but none of the people inside the house are happy with it.
The price was increased because one of the housemates left so there's one occupied room here.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
If you have a contract then you either have to stay or find a replacement. It’s that simple.
You can’t just give a months notice.
Have someone qualified to check your contract to make sure it’s all legal, especially regarding increases.
If it is, you signed it so you you have to fulfill it
I got advice from qualified people and other landlords I know and they all said it is fine.
Correct me if I'm wrong but I remember the law saying the same thing unless it's specified in the contract that I have to bring someone else to replace me.
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I got advice from qualified people and other landlords I know and they all said it is fine.
Correct me if I'm wrong but I remember the law saying the same thing unless it's specified in the contract that I have to bring someone else to replace me.
That’s them offering you a get out. If your tenancy is one year for example then you are legally obliged to pay rent for one year. Letting you find a replacement is not something they have to do.
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Since it's for the whole property it makes sense to raise the rent so that the landlord has the same of money each month but none of the people inside the house are happy with it.
The price was increased because one of the housemates left so there's one occupied room here.
There's your answer, and why it's so important to find a replacement tenant before you leave
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I found out not a long time ago that the contract is for the whole property and not for a single room.
Noobie mistake.
So the rent hasn't increased, it's just divided by fewer people. Did you read what you signed?

How was someone able to leave, without either finding a replacement, or continuing to pay their share of the rent?
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Always_Confused
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That sounds about right. If you sign a 12 month contract, you have to remain in the property for 12 months. You can avoid paying rent on a property you aren't living in by having someone take over the contract. There doesn't have to be a clause in the contract about this, because you've already agreed to live there for a time.
The landlord wont be looking for someone else to take over the contract because you and the rest of the tenants are liable for the rent if you don't find someone.
They haven't increased your rent. You and the other tenants signed a contract for the whole property. When another tenant lived there, it was split between x people. Now they've left, it's split among x - 1 people which means everyone is paying more, but again, the landlord hasn't done anything wrong because technically, you have signed a contract to pay a total amount of rent that all the tenant's rents should add up to.
Your best bet is to remain within the property and find a single tenant to take over the unoccupied room. This would be much easier than having everyone in the house find replacement tenants.
At least you know to read and understand the terms of the next housing contract you sign. Take this as a lesson!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Always_Confused)
That sounds about right. If you sign a 12 month contract, you have to remain in the property for 12 months. You can avoid paying rent on a property you aren't living in by having someone take over the contract. There doesn't have to be a clause in the contract about this, because you've already agreed to live there for a time.
The landlord wont be looking for someone else to take over the contract because you and the rest of the tenants are liable for the rent if you don't find someone.
They haven't increased your rent. You and the other tenants signed a contract for the whole property. When another tenant lived there, it was split between x people. Now they've left, it's split among x - 1 people which means everyone is paying more, but again, the landlord hasn't done anything wrong because technically, you have signed a contract to pay a total amount of rent that all the tenant's rents should add up to.
Your best bet is to remain within the property and find a single tenant to take over the unoccupied room. This would be much easier than having everyone in the house find replacement tenants.
At least you know to read and understand the terms of the next housing contract you sign. Take this as a lesson!
None of us actually signed anything after the contract ended.
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2500_2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
None of us actually signed anything after the contract ended.
So you DON'T have a contract? You're going to have to be a bit clearer if you want accurate advice.

If it that you DID have a contract and now you are in an automatic contract extension period? If so you do have the right to give notice but it will require you all giving notice if the contract is for the whole house.
Last edited by 2500_2; 4 weeks ago
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999tigger
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi there, I want to move out because my landlord increased the price of the rent by 70%.
They refuse to let me go without bringing someone to replace me because I have a contract without a break clause but the contract doesn't say anything about me having to bring someone in and I also gave a 1 month notice to them.
They're also not making any effort to find tenants.
The same thing is happening to my housemate.

What's to be done?
Speak to Shelter as there sounds to be lots of missing details or CAB as its easier doing it over the phone to get all the missing details.
https://england.shelter.org.uk/get_help

Ps your account is only partial and as such you are better off seeing an adviser and they should be able to see the contract. They really need to see it with their own eyes as I dont think your ability to read contracts is reliable.

If there is an empty room, then why havent you got someone to fill it?
Last edited by 999tigger; 4 weeks ago
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Since it's for the whole property it makes sense to raise the rent so that the landlord has the same of money each month but none of the people inside the house are happy with it.
The price was increased because one of the housemates left so there's one occupied room here.
So they havent increased the rent, all 3 of you signed a joint tenancy & all 3 of you are responsible and accountable for paying it. Typically in the scenario the person who dropped out early should seek the replacement tenant and continue to pay their fair share until that happens, but it sounds like they just jumped and has burdened you two with the rent (despite also being responsible for it).

I would get on spareroom and try and find a new tennant, and go back to the housemate who left and try to get the rent they owe for the months since leaving.
Last edited by mnot; 4 weeks ago
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Anonymous)
None of us actually signed anything after the contract ended.
Rental contracts typically contain a provision to continue on a month to month basis after the assured short-hold has ended, so I expect that you're still bound by that.

How did someone leave without finding a replacement or continuing to pay their share of the rent? They couldn't give a month's notice - you would all need to. That you didn't understand this isn't the landlord's fault.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 4 weeks ago
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by 2500_2)
So you DON'T have a contract? You're going to have to be a bit clearer if you want accurate advice.

If it that you DID have a contract and now you are in an automatic contract extension period? If so you do have the right to give notice but it will require you all giving notice if the contract is for the whole house.
I think I'm in an extension period. Landlord doesn't want to give explanation or make things clear.
The rent raised as in we're supposed for the empty room my housemate left. He's in a different country and he only had 2 months of rent to pay before legally leaving. Since the room is still empty, the landlord wants to charge us all to compensate for it. I get that, it makes sense after all.
BUT I don't know if this is a joint tenancy or not, we're in an extension period now but the landlord acts like we already signed a new contract which is false as none of us 3 remaining signed anything and refuses to give any information regarding the tenancy.
I can't do anything properly unless the landlord is telling me what is actually going on with my tenancy.

It's my first landlord in the UK as I moved here without knowing almost anything and now I have to deal with the situation.

I spoke to Citizens Advice and they basically told me to give a months notice and pack my stuff and leave but I don't want to create problems for myself and for the landlord for obvious reasons.
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Anonymous #1
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The landlord is also telling me that because I continued to pay, my signature was "implied".
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