Did any of you pick Computer Science at A-Level...

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username5409490
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Without studying it at GCSE? So far, I've understood hardly anything, even though I have quite a bit of knowledge when it comes to both hardware and software.
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Randomer_7
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Get a good CS textbook relevant to your exam board and go through topics in your own time. Keep on top of all your work. I also found CS hard at the start of year 12 but a couple weeks in, after going through topics I was fine. Good luck 👍
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blackugo
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I it at gcse. I suggest learning how to actually program in your free time it makes it much easier.
Then the hardware stuff is mostly basic memorising. Just use active recall for all of that.

What do you mean when you say you don't understand any examples about what you don't specifically understand?
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username5409490
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(Original post by Randomer_7)
Get a good CS textbook relevant to your exam board and go through topics in your own time. Keep on top of all your work. I also found CS hard at the start of year 12 but a couple weeks in, after going through topics I was fine. Good luck 👍
Thanks. Will look for some books asap.
(Original post by blackugo)
I it at gcse. I suggest learning how to actually program in your free time it makes it much easier.
Then the hardware stuff is mostly basic memorising. Just use active recall for all of that.

What do you mean when you say you don't understand any examples about what you don't specifically understand?
I don't even know what pseudo code is. We haven't really started but compared to everyone else, I'm about 40x worse.
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blackugo
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(Original post by dropdehbombman)
I don't even know what pseudo code is. We haven't really started but compared to everyone else, I'm about 40x worse.
Yeah you just gotta go home and find it out. If you didn't do it at gcse you just don't know it yet. Most of the content isn't difficult to understand its mainly the algorithms that might get you thinking. You don't need to worry about everyone else because you have 2 years to learn the content.
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username5409490
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(Original post by blackugo)
Yeah you just gotta go home and find it out. If you didn't do it at gcse you just don't know it yet. Most of the content isn't difficult to understand its mainly the algorithms that might get you thinking. You don't need to worry about everyone else because you have 2 years to learn the content.
Would you recommend revising using an A-Level or GCSE book?
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blackugo
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(Original post by dropdehbombman)
Would you recommend revising using an A-Level or GCSE book?
A level. Most of the gcse content should be covered in the A level textbook just in more detail. If the textbook is confusing sometimes it is best to turn to Google or YouTube because there will be better explanations there.

The strategy I used was making notes from the textbook. Then writing out loads questions from my notes on notion such as... . What are the disadvantages of using HDDs? And have the answer hidden under a toggle. I'd then just go through these periodically. I then also used the topic tests on physics and maths tutor after making notes. I then repeated these (spaced repetition) at intervals. I increased the intervals between topic tests depending on the percentage I got. If I got 90% I'd do it in a month and if I got 30% I'd redo it in a few days. If
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username5409490
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(Original post by blackugo)
A level. Most of the gcse content should be covered in the A level textbook just in more detail. If the textbook is confusing sometimes it is best to turn to Google or YouTube because there will be better explanations there.

The strategy I used was making notes from the textbook. Then writing out loads questions from my notes on notion such as... . What are the disadvantages of using HDDs? And have the answer hidden under a toggle. I'd then just go through these periodically. I then also used the topic tests on physics and maths tutor after making notes. I then repeated these (spaced repetition) at intervals. I increased the intervals between topic tests depending on the percentage I got. If I got 90% I'd do it in a month and if I got 30% I'd redo it in a few days. If
Thanks. I prefer mind maps, basically the same as notes but easier to view and organise for me.
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blackugo
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(Original post by dropdehbombman)
Thanks. I prefer mind maps, basically the same as notes but easier to view and organise for me.
Yeah that's still counts as note taking in my books.
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