Why does the trachea prevent the airways collapsing during inspiration ?

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seals2001
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Surely the cartilage stops the trachea flattening in expiration , NOT inspiration , as this is when all of the air is removed from the airways ? Like, if I force air out of a bag it flattens, it doesn't flatten if I force air into the bag though..
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ecolier
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Because there's cartilage preventing it from collapsing? Am I missing something here?

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seals2001
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(Original post by ecolier)
Because there's cartilage preventing it from collapsing? Am I missing something here?

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* I meant why does the trachea stop it collapsing . My apologies.
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kekedoyouloveme?
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does it? It's incomplete I know that to allow movement of the food in the Oesophagus because that's behind it, it keeps the airways open, and prevents constriction of the airway tubes, i think it all links with maintaining a gradient via ventilation to allow gas exchange to happen :/ sorry I'm not that great at bio
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ecolier
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(Original post by seals2001)
* I meant why does the trachea stop it collapsing . My apologies.
Your lungs work differently to you putting a hand on a bag.

Inspiration is due to your diaphragm pulling down, decreasing the intrathoracic cavity pressure. It makes it negative to the surrounding and therefore air rushes in your lungs (passively).

Expiration is due to your diaphragm rising up, it increases the pressure and air moves out.

I don't really know if this answers your question, because I don't really understand your question in the first place!: :lol:
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moonkatt
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The negative pressure generated on inspiration could collapse the trachea if you didn’t have the cartilaginous rings, it’d be a floppy tube so would close up like sucking on an old plastic maccies straw in a milkshake, which would cause issues getting gases into the lungs. Those rings help keep its shape allowing gases to flow freely.
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seals2001
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(Original post by ecolier)
Your lungs work differently to you putting a hand on a bag.

Inspiration is due to your diaphragm pulling down, decreasing the intrathoracic cavity pressure. It makes it negative to the surrounding and therefore air rushes in your lungs (passively).

Expiration is due to your diaphragm rising up, it increases the pressure and air moves out.

I don't really know if this answers your question, because I don't really understand your question in the first place!: :lol:
In expiration, air moves out of the lungs. Less air in the trachea means that there are no particles colliding with the trachea's inside walls, yet still there are air particles colliding with the outside walls, thus, if no cartilage is present, the trachea collapses inwards. This would occur during expiration yet the mark scheme I have read says the trachea's cartilage prevents it collapsing during inspiration. How ?
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ecolier
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(Original post by seals2001)
In expiration, air moves out of the lungs. Less air in the trachea means that there are no particles colliding with the trachea's inside walls, yet still there are air particles colliding with the outside walls, thus, if no cartilage is present, the trachea collapses inwards. This would occur during expiration yet the mark scheme I have read says the trachea's cartilage prevents it collapsing during inspiration. How ?
Moonkatt explained it better than I did - your intrathoracic pressure turns negative (relative to the outside world) during inspiration.

It's just how your body is designed to get air in.

If there were no cartilage, the trachea would just collapse during this.

So imagine you have a hoover (vacuum cleaner), and the hose instead of being a rigid plastic, is made of soft plastic. When you turn it on, what will happen?
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