riley27458
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So a weird one but I'm looking for anyone who knows specifically information on resitting GCSE's later on in life, (35).
Essentially I was a young carer in my teens so missed a lot of schooling and my GCSE results suffered 4C's 5D's. I love learning and am keen on improving my qualifications. I went on to study law at degree as a mature student but not having good GCSE's and non existant A Levels I'm keen to bring my knowledge up to scratch to improve my CV and job prospects. I have no clue about how to write and my maths is now non existent as I rarely use it but I feel like I'd like to improve it again and am also interested in various subjects these days so don't balk at the idea of essentially going back to school and taking on a few more subjects.
Does anyone know about how I would go about studying in my own time and taking the exams at private exam centres? I don't want to pay £300-£500 per subject at a private school as I am more than capable of learning the curriculum myself.
I also plan to take a few A levels too once I have the GCSE's up to scratch so if anyone has information on sitting those as a private individual I would be ever so grateful.
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MrMemez1
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Right, I am 16 and I pulled out all 11 9s. The best way for you to study is to buy the textbook for each subject. So, for example if you are doing Edexcel, buy the Edexcel textbook for Maths for example. Do every page in the textbook and you will be guaranteed 8/9. GCSEs are very doable to learn in 2-4 weeks. BUY THE RIGHT TEXTBOOK FOR EACH EXAMBOARD. Hopefully, when you get past GCSEs and A levels, it will help kickstart your life again. Best wishes.
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ClippTube
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Buy text books and go over exam papers so you are familiar with the types of exam questions that may come up, also check the syllabus to use as a check list to ensure you have covered most things for when you take the exam
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riley27458
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(Original post by MrMemez1)
Right, I am 16 and I pulled out all 11 9s. The best way for you to study is to buy the textbook for each subject. So, for example if you are doing Edexcel, buy the Edexcel textbook for Maths for example. Do every page in the textbook and you will be guaranteed 8/9. GCSEs are very doable to learn in 2-4 weeks. BUY THE RIGHT TEXTBOOK FOR EACH EXAMBOARD. Hopefully, when you get past GCSEs and A levels, it will help kickstart your life again. Best wishes.
Thank you for your response. That's good to know. It's what I've done so far so it's reassuring that I'm on the right track. I'm aiming for Edexcel as they let me do the GCSE English as a private individual whereas AQA don't. I've bought the revision and workbooks for each core subject plus business, history and spanish. Thank you once again.
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riley27458
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(Original post by ClippTube)
Buy text books and go over exam papers so you are familiar with the types of exam questions that may come up, also check the syllabus to use as a check list to ensure you have covered most things for when you take the exam
Excellent, thank you. I will do that.
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hajima
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(Original post by MrMemez1)
Right, I am 16 and I pulled out all 11 9s. The best way for you to study is to buy the textbook for each subject. So, for example if you are doing Edexcel, buy the Edexcel textbook for Maths for example. Do every page in the textbook and you will be guaranteed 8/9. GCSEs are very doable to learn in 2-4 weeks. BUY THE RIGHT TEXTBOOK FOR EACH EXAMBOARD. Hopefully, when you get past GCSEs and A levels, it will help kickstart your life again. Best wishes.
In what year (2018, 2019 etc) did you get your 11 9s?
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Compost
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Avoid subjects with non-examination assessment (NEA) as they are extremely hard to achieve as a private candidate.

I think you need to pick IGCSE English Language to avoid the speaking and listening element that is hard for private candidates to complete. AQA is more up front about some GCSEs not being feasible for private candidates, the other boards don't ban them but they are very hard to achieve. IGCSEs always have a no-coursework option. Edexcel would be the best bet.

To enter as a private candidate, you need to find an exam centre (=any secondary school or college, plus some private providers) willing to accept you as a private candidate and everything is arranged through them. Expect to pay £100-£150 per GCSE, assuming they are 100% exam and nothing else (e.g. the speaking and listening for English, Spanish oral) and you don't need any access arrangements (extra time, room on your own etc)

You don't have to stick to Edexcel for everything - for instance, AQA is a much more popular board than Edexcel for Spanish and choosing that might find it easier to find a centre to conduct the speaking exam. Edexcel is the most popular for Maths.
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riley27458
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(Original post by Compost)
Avoid subjects with non-examination assessment (NEA) as they are extremely hard to achieve as a private candidate.

I think you need to pick IGCSE English Language to avoid the speaking and listening element that is hard for private candidates to complete. AQA is more up front about some GCSEs not being feasible for private candidates, the other boards don't ban them but they are very hard to achieve. IGCSEs always have a no-coursework option. Edexcel would be the best bet.

To enter as a private candidate, you need to find an exam centre (=any secondary school or college, plus some private providers) willing to accept you as a private candidate and everything is arranged through them. Expect to pay £100-£150 per GCSE, assuming they are 100% exam and nothing else (e.g. the speaking and listening for English, Spanish oral) and you don't need any access arrangements (extra time, room on your own etc)

You don't have to stick to Edexcel for everything - for instance, AQA is a much more popular board than Edexcel for Spanish and choosing that might find it easier to find a centre to conduct the speaking exam. Edexcel is the most popular for Maths.
Thank you ☺️ I have found a testing centre near me whose website said essentially the same as you. They do mention about Edexcel GCSE not having the NEA part but I’ll be speaking to them today on the phone to clarify otherwise I will take the IGCSE.
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giella
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You really don’t need to retake a lot of GCSEs. Maths and English perhaps, but not much else, especially not in your 30s.
If you want to study law, I would look towards doing an access course with resits of Maths and English. Your local college can provide that. Alternatively, many universities run foundation years or the equivalent of access courses themselves now. The Open University is one example. Manchester Metropolitan University runs a law foundation degree for under represented students with minimal entry requirements as well, which I believe you would qualify for. I would investigate these options further.
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riley27458
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(Original post by giella)
You really don’t need to retake a lot of GCSEs. Maths and English perhaps, but not much else, especially not in your 30s.
If you want to study law, I would look towards doing an access course with resits of Maths and English. Your local college can provide that. Alternatively, many universities run foundation years or the equivalent of access courses themselves now. The Open University is one example. Manchester Metropolitan University runs a law foundation degree for under represented students with minimal entry requirements as well, which I believe you would qualify for. I would investigate these options further.
Thank you. I already have a law degree as I was admitted as a mature student, I achieved a 2:2 (all higher 50’s) as I had no prior knowledge of how to write an essay or how to properly study etc. In hindsight I should have taken the access course but I’m considerIng taking the LLM now after studying for my GCSE’s and A Levels first in order to properly equip myself for that level of intensive study. I don’t want to make the same mistake again of signing up to an expensive degree without having the requisite skill set to achieve the top marks.
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giella
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(Original post by riley27458)
Thank you. I already have a law degree as I was admitted as a mature student, I achieved a 2:2 (all higher 50’s) as I had no prior knowledge of how to write an essay or how to properly study etc. In hindsight I should have taken the access course but I’m considerIng taking the LLM now after studying for my GCSE’s and A Levels first in order to properly equip myself for that level of intensive study. I don’t want to make the same mistake again of signing up to an expensive degree without having the requisite skill set to achieve the top marks.
Sorry I misread this at first. However, on rereading this and your reply I would advise that neither employers nor admissions teams would be likely to consider GCSEs taken after a degree. A degree would supersede all of these. A GCSE would not be considered adequate preparation for master’s level study If you don’t feel that you have the skills from a degree to prepare you for master’s level work, then you might want to reconsider whether or not you should be doing a master’s at all. You technically meet the minimum requirements for many master’s level courses and yet you don’t feel that you are ready. I think you need to explore your motives For studying at this level further. Going back to GCSE is not going to reset the clock and employers are unlikely even to look at the date of a GCSE. They would only care about your degree. If you had to explain it to them, they’d probably think the same as I do.
I would recommend seeing a career coach or having a chat with an admissions officer rather charging into this.
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MrMemez1
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(Original post by riley27458)
Thank you. I already have a law degree as I was admitted as a mature student, I achieved a 2:2 (all higher 50’s) as I had no prior knowledge of how to write an essay or how to properly study etc. In hindsight I should have taken the access course but I’m considerIng taking the LLM now after studying for my GCSE’s and A Levels first in order to properly equip myself for that level of intensive study. I don’t want to make the same mistake again of signing up to an expensive degree without having the requisite skill set to achieve the top marks.
The best way for you to get the top grade 8/9. I would recommend downloading discord and join a discord server for the subject you are sitting. On these servers, there a lot of people with Bachelors, Masters and even PhDs that can help you instantaneously. This is how I did well in my exams, I asked very frequently to these people on questions I do not know. Additionally, it is very possible to self study a whole GCSE in 2 weeks if you are willing to put in 3-6 hours a day on dedicated studying. I hope you do well. Message me if you need help to get onto discord and join a server where there is thousands of people. I believe in you! This will help kickstart your life around!
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riley27458
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(Original post by MrMemez1)
The best way for you to get the top grade 8/9. I would recommend downloading discord and join a discord server for the subject you are sitting. On these servers, there a lot of people with Bachelors, Masters and even PhDs that can help you instantaneously. This is how I did well in my exams, I asked very frequently to these people on questions I do not know. Additionally, it is very possible to self study a whole GCSE in 2 weeks if you are willing to put in 3-6 hours a day on dedicated studying. I hope you do well. Message me if you need help to get onto discord and join a server where there is thousands of people. I believe in you! This will help kickstart your life around!
Thank you for this. I have started studying the GCSE English and find it quite refreshing to finally understand what I should have done years ago.
I have been on discord before so understand a little about it but it was a bit confusing to be honest 😂
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MrMemez1
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(Original post by riley27458)
Thank you for this. I have started studying the GCSE English and find it quite refreshing to finally understand what I should have done years ago.
I have been on discord before so understand a little about it but it was a bit confusing to be honest 😂
Go onto Google and type in English Discord server and join accordingly.
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riley27458
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(Original post by giella)
Sorry I misread this at first. However, on rereading this and your reply I would advise that neither employers nor admissions teams would be likely to consider GCSEs taken after a degree. A degree would supersede all of these. A GCSE would not be considered adequate preparation for master’s level study If you don’t feel that you have the skills from a degree to prepare you for master’s level work, then you might want to reconsider whether or not you should be doing a master’s at all. You technically meet the minimum requirements for many master’s level courses and yet you don’t feel that you are ready. I think you need to explore your motives For studying at this level further. Going back to GCSE is not going to reset the clock and employers are unlikely even to look at the date of a GCSE. They would only care about your degree. If you had to explain it to them, they’d probably think the same as I do.
I would recommend seeing a career coach or having a chat with an admissions officer rather charging into this.
I’m not taking GCSE’s to be considered on my CV I’m taking them to prepare me for A Levels and perhaps a masters degree. There’s more to education than merely the grade that I need. I actually need the base knowledge and understanding. I am very passionate about education so taking extra courses is not an upheaval for me. I sincerely enjoy it.
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2childmum!
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Have you considered looking at Open University courses> You don't have to do a full degree with them, and if you already have a degree but feel you could do with studying and improving essay writing etc you might find they are at a more useful level that GCSEs. Having said that it is probably worth getting English Language and Maths GCSE as you never know in the future whether an employer or uni might ask for it
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