Self Studying an AS/ A Level alongside Uni

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cf18372
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I'm studying BSc Criminology at Bristol, but i'm contemplating doing a GEP to study Medicine afterwards. I have no a levels and most courses require at least AS Biology/Maths. I've still got my maths textbooks from when i attempted sixth form (both specs) but is it a reasonable expectation that i could do this alongside uni and work?
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Jatant
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There’s a few uni’s that don’t look at your A Levels and which also accept non-science degrees, have you thought about just applying to those?
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(Original post by Jatant)
There’s a few uni’s that don’t look at your A Levels and which also accept non-science degrees, have you thought about just applying to those?
most of the 8 that do non-science degrees still require at least an AS.
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(Original post by cf18372)
most of the 8 that do non-science degrees still require at least an AS.
I’m applying to GEM this year and I did terrible in my A Levels so I’m applying to unis that don’t look at them. Have a look at St George’s, Warwick, Nottingham And Swansea - off the top of my head I believe they only look at your degree grade and entrance exam.
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(Original post by Jatant)
I’m applying to GEM this year and I did terrible in my A Levels so I’m applying to unis that don’t look at them. Have a look at St George’s, Warwick, Nottingham And Swansea - off the top of my head I believe they only look at your degree grade and entrance exam.
im looking at Warwick but also Cambridge if i keep up the current grades. plus i kind of just want to do maths because i miss it ahh
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(Original post by cf18372)
im looking at Warwick but also Cambridge if i keep up the current grades. plus i kind of just want to do maths because i miss it ahh
Do you roughly know why type of medicine you want to specialise in later? I only ask because Oxford and Cambridge prepare their students more towards research as apposed to clinical settings. I had a friend who went there for GEM and it was very lecture heavy.
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(Original post by Jatant)
Do you roughly know why type of medicine you want to specialise in later? I only ask because Oxford and Cambridge prepare their students more towards research as apposed to clinical settings. I had a friend who went there for GEM and it was very lecture heavy.
not hugely, its just an idea rn, i have 2 of 4 years left of UG yet, im still not sure if i want to do medicine or law.
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(Original post by cf18372)
I'm studying BSc Criminology at Bristol, but i'm contemplating doing a GEP to study Medicine afterwards. I have no a levels and most courses require at least AS Biology/Maths. I've still got my maths textbooks from when i attempted sixth form (both specs) but is it a reasonable expectation that i could do this alongside uni and work?
Really depends on you and your degree. There are plenty of people who can barely work for a degree and come out with a 2.1, there are others who need to work a lot.

Also depends how easy you'll find maths and biology! What grade would you actually need?

(Original post by Jatant)
Do you roughly know why type of medicine you want to specialise in later? I only ask because Oxford and Cambridge prepare their students more towards research as apposed to clinical settings.
That's not quit right.

They prepare their students to use and perform research within or alongside the clinical setting. They believe that a doctor should be basing their decisions on the latest scientific evidence, and the best way to do that is to train them to interpret and write research themselves. They want their doctors to be writing the guideline, not just following them.

Regardless of whether you think that's a BS approach though: like 99% of Oxford graduates become clinical doctors when they leave uni i.e. the same as everywhere else.
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by cf18372)
I'm studying BSc Criminology at Bristol, but i'm contemplating doing a GEP to study Medicine afterwards. I have no a levels and most courses require at least AS Biology/Maths. I've still got my maths textbooks from when i attempted sixth form (both specs) but is it a reasonable expectation that i could do this alongside uni and work?
Hi!

I think what matters most if you think you could comfortably manage your time to fit it all in. I had a friend in second year who studied for her maths A level alongside her work in second year as well as an 8 hour part time job. The best thing I recommend from what she told me was to have a weekly calendar to use as a work timetable. She would set one or two 40 minute sessions a day to work on her A level subject as well as two hours (ish) on her uni work. Planning out your time will be vital and you need to make sure you can fully commit to it. I think it would be a great challenge and would be such an achievement.

Best of luck at uni! Sam- Official Student Rep
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(Original post by nexttime)
Really depends on you and your degree. There are plenty of people who can barely work for a degree and come out with a 2.1, there are others who need to work a lot.

Also depends how easy you'll find maths and biology! What grade would you actually need?


That's not quit right.

They prepare their students to use and perform research within or alongside the clinical setting. They believe that a doctor should be basing their decisions on the latest scientific evidence, and the best way to do that is to train them to interpret and write research themselves. They want their doctors to be writing the guideline, not just following them.

Regardless of whether you think that's a BS approach though: like 99% of Oxford graduates become clinical doctors when they leave uni i.e. the same as everywhere else.
I've done pretty well in first year, mostly high 2:1/1sts, and I work 18 hours alongside (although if I escape redundancy it'll be a little less, so probably 12ish). I have a good (ish) grasp of AS Maths as I did it at sixth form before I dropped out but im used to the old spec and the new spec confused me a little when i retook in 2018. Id probably need a B in both, and would probably work and do bio after i graduate before applying for a GEP (almost like a gap year).

Like ive previously said, im unsure if i want to go into Law or Medicine right now but also kind of want to do maths for fun because I originally wanted to do a Maths degree but i had to drop out of school. It interesting to see different opinions on Oxbridge courses and their preparations for post uni.
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(Original post by University of Portsmouth Student Rep)
Hi!

I think what matters most if you think you could comfortably manage your time to fit it all in. I had a friend in second year who studied for her maths A level alongside her work in second year as well as an 8 hour part time job. The best thing I recommend from what she told me was to have a weekly calendar to use as a work timetable. She would set one or two 40 minute sessions a day to work on her A level subject as well as two hours (ish) on her uni work. Planning out your time will be vital and you need to make sure you can fully commit to it. I think it would be a great challenge and would be such an achievement.

Best of luck at uni! Sam- Official Student Rep
Hey Sam!

Honestly i'm the kind of scatterbrained person who leaves everything to the last minute and somehow does really well anyway, and i'm trying to set out my time more to decrease stress and hopefully do even better. I also run a society and need to figure out how to balance my time really. I work 18h a week currently and will probs reduce if i don't get made redundant. I'm just looking into possibilities for now but would probably like to do maths for fun anyway.

Thanks for your well wishes!

Chloe
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(Original post by nexttime)
Really depends on you and your degree. There are plenty of people who can barely work for a degree and come out with a 2.1, there are others who need to work a lot.

Also depends how easy you'll find maths and biology! What grade would you actually need?


That's not quit right.

They prepare their students to use and perform research within or alongside the clinical setting. They believe that a doctor should be basing their decisions on the latest scientific evidence, and the best way to do that is to train them to interpret and write research themselves. They want their doctors to be writing the guideline, not just following them.

Regardless of whether you think that's a BS approach though: like 99% of Oxford graduates become clinical doctors when they leave uni i.e. the same as everywhere else.
LOOLL triggered much?

As I said, my friends go there and that’s what they said. Of course they still become a clinical doctor 😂

I also attended both open days and was told as much by the professors. “The course at our university will prepare you more for research compared to other universities” were the words I remember clearly so not BS unfortunately.
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(Original post by Jatant)
LOOLL triggered much?

As I said, my friends go there and that’s what they said. Of course they still become a clinical doctor 😂

I also attended both open days and was told as much by the professors. “The course at our university will prepare you more for research compared to other universities” were the words I remember clearly so not BS unfortunately.
Wow no need to overreact. You just seemed to suggest that Oxford medicine grads didn't become doctors, literally saying "as opposed to clinical setting". That is wrong. Like 99% become doctors. Just saying.
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(Original post by nexttime)
Wow no need to overreact. You just seemed to suggest that Oxford medicine grads didn't become doctors, literally saying "as opposed to clinical setting". That is wrong. Like 99% become doctors. Just saying.
When I said that I mean the other unis really put an emphasis on clinical experience and you can be in a hospital within your first month. Whereas, Oxford is very lecture heavy.
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