app_
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Is it worth it to wait until Christmas to get a laptop with 11th gen i5 or now, with 10th gen? I need it for uni - yt videos, word/office apps, zoom & web browsing, and won't be using it for anything else (eg no gaming), which I'll be starting in Oct.
I understand the 11th gen is supposed to be much better than 10th gen (ie 0.6Ghz faster clock speeds & 2mb more cache), but how much of a difference will it make in real life for the tasks previously mentioned?
I'd prefer a laptop with better battery life than performance
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username5177602
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(Original post by app_)
Is it worth it to wait until Christmas to get a laptop with 11th gen i5 or now, with 10th gen? I need it for uni - yt videos, word/office apps, zoom & web browsing, and won't be using it for anything else (eg no gaming), which I'll be starting in Oct.
I understand the 11th gen is supposed to be much better than 10th gen (ie 0.6Ghz faster clock speeds & 2mb more cache), but how much of a difference will it make in real life for the tasks previously mentioned?
I'd prefer a laptop with better battery life than performance
To be honest, it might make a difference(it will for more intensive workloads), but if you need something now then I'd say it's not worth the wait for the tasks you've mentioned. Any longevity benefits will largely come down to developers taking advantage of the extra cores compared to the older CPUs. It's also worth noting that if you're looking at cheaper laptops, whilst I might be wrong on this, I wouldn't expect them to get Tiger Lake until next year.
Last edited by username5177602; 4 weeks ago
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Kogomogo
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I'd personally wait just the couple months to get the upgraded one, and use uni library in the meantime. I don't think it'll make much difference for the sort of things you want to to use it for, but i'd rather future proof a laptop as much as possible to last them few years longer, plus newer os versions and updates tend to put more of a strain on the hardware so an upgraded one should last you longer. If you're not too bothered about it lasting too long past uni and want one now then i wouldn't feel too bad about getting a lower specced one now though, especially if there's better things you can do with the money that will help your studies this year.
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(Original post by bluewolf21)
To be honest, it might make a difference(it will for more intensive workloads), but if you need something now then I'd say it's not worth the wait for the tasks you've mentioned. Any longevity benefits come down to developers taking advantage of the extra cores compared to the older CPUs. It's also worth noting that if you're looking at cheaper laptops, whilst I might be wrong on this, I wouldn't expect them to get Tiger Lake until next year.
ohh okay thank you! They've both got the same no. of cores so I guess there would be any significant longevity benefits?
I read online that the new swift 3 is being released soon w tiger lake for $700. That's what I caught my eye, but ofc if there's not any significant difference for general tasks then I guess it's not worth the wait like you said.
Thank you so much
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username5177602
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(Original post by app_)
ohh okay thank you! They've both got the same no. of cores so I guess there would be any significant longevity benefits?
I read online that the new swift 3 is being released soon w tiger lake for $700. That's what I caught my eye, but ofc if there's not any significant difference for general tasks then I guess it's not worth the wait like you said.
Thank you so much
No worries. You may get a bit of extra time with it, but in the long run, I wouldn't expect too much out of it.
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(Original post by Kogomogo)
I'd personally wait just the couple months to get the upgraded one, and use uni library in the meantime. I don't think it'll make much difference for the sort of things you want to to use it for, but i'd rather future proof a laptop as much as possible to last them few years longer, plus newer os versions and updates tend to put more of a strain on the hardware so an upgraded one should last you longer. If you're not too bothered about it lasting too long past uni and want one now then i wouldn't feel too bad about getting a lower specced one now though, especially if there's better things you can do with the money that will help your studies this year.
Ahh okay. I was hoping it would last 5-6yrs. I guess I was also worried about the lack of reviews for the newer laptops. The price range is about £700-800 so I was assuming that a lot of laptops in this range would be fairly long lasting?
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AcseI
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(Original post by app_)
Is it worth it to wait until Christmas to get a laptop with 11th gen i5 or now, with 10th gen?
For what it's worth, 8th gen i5s are still perfectly respectable chips, especially for the workloads you mention. There's always going to be something new on the horizon, and sometimes if you don't just make the purchase when you need it you'll constantly be waiting.

You're unlikely to see significant differences (in battery life or performance) when 11th gen is released, and certainly not enough to justify waiting if you need something now.
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Kogomogo
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(Original post by app_)
Ahh okay. I was hoping it would last 5-6yrs. I guess I was also worried about the lack of reviews for the newer laptops. The price range is about £700-800 so I was assuming that a lot of laptops in this range would be fairly long lasting?
A laptop in that price range should last a fair while, i had a dell in that range that lasted me ten years (admittedly the last couple years were slow) so it should all come down to how well you take care of it and don't clog it up with too many orograms.
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(Original post by AcseI)
For what it's worth, 8th gen i5s are still perfectly respectable chips, especially for the workloads you mention. There's always going to be something new on the horizon, and sometimes if you don't just make the purchase when you need it you'll constantly be waiting.

You're unlikely to see significant differences (in battery life or performance) when 11th gen is released, and certainly not enough to justify waiting if you need something now.
oh okay, thank you so much.
My current laptop has a 5th gen i3, and it works fine for all the tasks. A little slow under massive loads but works well for everything else.
The only problem is battery life, hence why I'm looking for a new one. I wasn't really sure how much of a difference 10th vs 11th gen i5 would make as I've only had this one laptop!
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(Original post by Kogomogo)
A laptop in that price range should last a fair while, i had a dell in that range that lasted me ten years (admittedly the last couple years were slow) so it should all come down to how well you take care of it and don't clog it up with too many orograms.
ahhhh that's amazing!!
Thank you for your help
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AcseI
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(Original post by app_)
oh okay, thank you so much.
My current laptop has a 5th gen i3, and it works fine for all the tasks. A little slow under massive loads but works well for everything else.
The only problem is battery life, hence why I'm looking for a new one. I wasn't really sure how much of a difference 10th vs 11th gen i5 would make as I've only had this one laptop!
So historically speaking, 8th gen was when we got the last big jump in performance. It's when Intel started offering low power quad core chips and we saw substantial improvements over 7th gen for obvious reasons. Prior to this, each new generation was fairly incremental. Same story for everything after. Compare the 10th gen 10210U to the 8th gen 8250U and you'll see the same roughly 10% difference you'd see between the 7th gen 7200U and 5th gen 5200U. But compare the 8250U to the 7200U and you can see anywhere up to 50% depending on the workload.

These incremental performance increases are fairly small and that's in synthetic workloads. In real life use (YT, essay writing, web browsing, etc.) you won't notice the difference. Compared to a 5th gen chip (and an i3 at that), you'll see significant gains for anything 8th gen and above. When it comes to battery life, you'll benefit from both more power efficient modern chips but also just having a new battery. 5th gen chips are around 5 years old at this point, and if your laptop is close to that age what you're seeing is normal battery degredation. Realistically 2-3 years is the sort of timeframe where batteries start to degrade by noticeable amounts.

So it doesn't really matter if you get 10th gen or 11th gen. You'll see significant performance improvements either way, and your battery life will just simply be better in a new laptop anyway. And if battery life is something that matters to you, you'll have more luck choosing a laptop with a large battery over waiting for minute gains from 11th gen.
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Kogomogo
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(Original post by app_)
ahhhh that's amazing!!
Thank you for your help
Just got onto my laptop and it says it's a tenth gen i5, been pretty happy with the speed of it so far in terms of browsing, booting up and a few programs.
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(Original post by AcseI)
So historically speaking, 8th gen was when we got the last big jump in performance. It's when Intel started offering low power quad core chips and we saw substantial improvements over 7th gen for obvious reasons. Prior to this, each new generation was fairly incremental. Same story for everything after. Compare the 10th gen 10210U to the 8th gen 8250U and you'll see the same roughly 10% difference you'd see between the 7th gen 7200U and 5th gen 5200U. But compare the 8250U to the 7200U and you can see anywhere up to 50% depending on the workload.

These incremental performance increases are fairly small and that's in synthetic workloads. In real life use (YT, essay writing, web browsing, etc.) you won't notice the difference. Compared to a 5th gen chip (and an i3 at that), you'll see significant gains for anything 8th gen and above. When it comes to battery life, you'll benefit from both more power efficient modern chips but also just having a new battery. 5th gen chips are around 5 years old at this point, and if your laptop is close to that age what you're seeing is normal battery degredation. Realistically 2-3 years is the sort of timeframe where batteries start to degrade by noticeable amounts.

So it doesn't really matter if you get 10th gen or 11th gen. You'll see significant performance improvements either way, and your battery life will just simply be better in a new laptop anyway. And if battery life is something that matters to you, you'll have more luck choosing a laptop with a large battery over waiting for minute gains from 11th gen.
Ahhh, I guess now that you've said that its really not worth waiting for one, especially if 10th & 11th gen are very similar performance-wise. And I'd also assume that 11th gen laptops would be more expensive than 10th gen (with all other specs being the same)
Thank you for your help
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(Original post by Kogomogo)
Just got onto my laptop and it says it's a tenth gen i5, been pretty happy with the speed of it so far in terms of browsing, booting up and a few programs.
ahhhhh sweet!! How old is your laptop?
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(Original post by app_)
Ahhh, I guess now that you've said that its really not worth waiting for one, especially if 10th & 11th gen are very similar performance-wise. And I'd also assume that 11th gen laptops would be more expensive than 10th gen (with all other specs being the same)
Thank you for your help
Well we don't know for sure at this point that 11th gen will be super similar to 10th gen performance wise. But based on previous trends and what we know, nobody is really expecting some magic jump in performance. You're right about pricing, and alongside being more expensive you'll have fewer options at launch. I'm generally not a fan of recommending bleeding edge products, since it's not uncommon for new products to be a little buggy at first, which increases your wait time further.

I think more than anything else though, 10th gen simply does the job you need it to do, is likely to do so for a long time, is available now and you want it now. That's enough of a reason to just buy a suitable laptop today rather than waiting.
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(Original post by app_)
ahhhhh sweet!! How old is your laptop?
Only a couple months so can't speak for longevity, but speed seems great right now. It's a dell one, think it was just under 500 price wise.
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spotify95
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(Original post by app_)
oh okay, thank you so much.
My current laptop has a 5th gen i3, and it works fine for all the tasks. A little slow under massive loads but works well for everything else.
The only problem is battery life, hence why I'm looking for a new one. I wasn't really sure how much of a difference 10th vs 11th gen i5 would make as I've only had this one laptop!
If it's a 5th gen i3 model laptop, then it will be a few years old now - what model laptop is it?
Back then, laptop batteries were replaceable, so you can quite easily just replace the battery if the battery is ageing a bit, but everything else is OK.
The i3 will be a dual core CPU; 8th gen i5's and newer (as well as Ryzen 5s) are quad core or above, so the extra cores will come in handy for intensive tasks.
For Word/Office/browsing, your current i3 will probably be fine (as will any decent dual core, e.g. my 4th gen dual core i5's are fine).
YouTube, Zoom and other online video conferencing software will also be fine on a dual core i3. It may be pushed a bit harder than it'd like to be, and you definitely want to be doing those sorts of things on mains power (you'll flatten your battery rather quickly), but those activities should be fine on your current laptop.
Of course, an 8th gen core i5 (and newer) will be better, and give you more longevity over the coming years, but unless you need to start doing intensive stuff, your current laptop should be OK. Especially if it has 8GB RAM and/or an SSD.
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(Original post by AcseI)
Well we don't know for sure at this point that 11th gen will be super similar to 10th gen performance wise. But based on previous trends and what we know, nobody is really expecting some magic jump in performance. You're right about pricing, and alongside being more expensive you'll have fewer options at launch. I'm generally not a fan of recommending bleeding edge products, since it's not uncommon for new products to be a little buggy at first, which increases your wait time further.

I think more than anything else though, 10th gen simply does the job you need it to do, is likely to do so for a long time, is available now and you want it now. That's enough of a reason to just buy a suitable laptop today rather than waiting.
ohh okay, thank you very much!
I remember reading online that tiger lake is supposedly a big jump from ice lake, but ofc there aren't any real-world tests to confirm that yet.
But now I think I'll take the 10th gen laptop, thank you for your help!
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(Original post by Kogomogo)
Only a couple months so can't speak for longevity, but speed seems great right now. It's a dell one, think it was just under 500 price wise.
ahhh okay that's good. I've heard dell is quite a reliable company too.
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(Original post by spotify95)
If it's a 5th gen i3 model laptop, then it will be a few years old now - what model laptop is it?
Back then, laptop batteries were replaceable, so you can quite easily just replace the battery if the battery is ageing a bit, but everything else is OK.
The i3 will be a dual core CPU; 8th gen i5's and newer (as well as Ryzen 5s) are quad core or above, so the extra cores will come in handy for intensive tasks.
For Word/Office/browsing, your current i3 will probably be fine (as will any decent dual core, e.g. my 4th gen dual core i5's are fine).
YouTube, Zoom and other online video conferencing software will also be fine on a dual core i3. It may be pushed a bit harder than it'd like to be, and you definitely want to be doing those sorts of things on mains power (you'll flatten your battery rather quickly), but those activities should be fine on your current laptop.
Of course, an 8th gen core i5 (and newer) will be better, and give you more longevity over the coming years, but unless you need to start doing intensive stuff, your current laptop should be OK. Especially if it has 8GB RAM and/or an SSD.
It's a HP Pavilion 15 - 5yrs old now. The only real issues are that the touchpad is no longer working as well (need to use a mouse) and that it's not that portable - I'd be taking it around quite a bit at uni, and I'd prefer to spend as little time plugged into the mains as possible.
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