sophiedancer20
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What is the best way for me to revise for my history exam? I am taking my exams in 2020/21 and due to covid-19, my GCSEs could be cancelled any second so every practise paper counts and I am really struggling with history. Can anyone help me?
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arobrusker
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First make a timeline. It doesn't have to look good, I just had a word document with all the dates and what happened listed. Then write next to each why it was important, what lead to it and what it lead to. That should be okay. Just make sure you're doing enough exam practice because you'll have to recall a lot of information and the best say to do that is practice it. Exams usually repeat questions or have favourite topics. Once you understand how to write them, you'll be fine. Oh and go through the specification if you haven't already. It'll both help you with content you need to study so that you don't get stuck on something that doesn't matter and it will say what they're looking for in a good essay.
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sophiedancer20
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Okay, thank you.
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Lilymae69
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im doing history gcse in 2022. just make sure u remember statistics and causes and effects
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TheHistoryNerd_
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Hey there! Year 12 here. For my gcse mocks (since I didn't actually get to sit the real thing) I made flashcards but useful flashcards. Let me explain haha. So, for example, one topic I studied was history of medicine. For History of Medicine, I made a flashcard for each subtopic. So I would have one flashcard for medieval med, one for renaissance, one for 18thc etc.... On each card I would write the KEY KEY dates in the topic, so for example, in Renaissance medicine I would write 1543 - Andreas Vesalius published 'Fabrica' as one of the KEY dates. So I would literally write a list of dates and next to them just simply write the key event in short terms, like, 1861 - Germ Theory published or 1798 - Jenner publishes smallpox findings. I would do this for each time period (ALL limited to ONE flashcard each) and then before going into the exam, I would only have these flashcards on me and I would flick through them, cementing the dates into my head. Obviously, for this little trick to work, you need to know the events, like you need to know WHY the events were significant and what Germ Theory actually is. Let me know if you have any questions or are confused, I explained this really badly haha.
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wastedcuriosity
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I did both A-Level and GCSE History
What worked best for me was starting off with simple timelines, just the date and briefly what happened, then I did some more in detail ones.
I also stuck loads of post-it notes around the house with dates and what happened - places where I'd see them everyday, like my mirror, opposite the loo (lol), on the fridge, etc etc.
Mind maps are also very very helpful, as well as Quizlet. I think I had about 600 flashcards, that I got parents and friends to test me on most days
Most important thing you need to do is essay plans. And even better, then writing these essays in exam conditions
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pikapanda05
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(Original post by sophiedancer20)
What is the best way for me to revise for my history exam? I am taking my exams in 2020/21 and due to covid-19, my GCSEs could be cancelled any second so every practise paper counts and I am really struggling with history. Can anyone help me?
Hi, I'm taking my GCSE exams the same year as you! I'm doing Germany, Elizabethan England and Conflict in Asia. My teacher recommended that we wrote a draft of key things that happened and then make a timeline. She also told us to write a list of questions that could appear on the test and try and answer them, because the exams boards try to trick you out with the wording of the questions and applying your knowledge to interpretations. Hope this helps and if you need any more advice, please feel free to message me
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archpowered
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(Original post by sophiedancer20)
What is the best way for me to revise for my history exam? I am taking my exams in 2020/21 and due to covid-19, my GCSEs could be cancelled any second so every practise paper counts and I am really struggling with history. Can anyone help me?
Hi, like many have said, I would do large chronological timelines colour coded by factors (economic, political, social ect) In my room over my bed so it was there when i woke Up . I would then also do essay plans for every potential essay that could come up, my teacher gave me a 62 page document for all the units we did. I then just memorised those plans, and changed aspects according to the question in the mock/exam/practice paper I sat. I ended up with a high grade 8
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sophiedancer20
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(Original post by TheHistoryNerd_)
Hey there! Year 12 here. For my gcse mocks (since I didn't actually get to sit the real thing) I made flashcards but useful flashcards. Let me explain haha. So, for example, one topic I studied was history of medicine. For History of Medicine, I made a flashcard for each subtopic. So I would have one flashcard for medieval med, one for renaissance, one for 18thc etc.... On each card I would write the KEY KEY dates in the topic, so for example, in Renaissance medicine I would write 1543 - Andreas Vesalius published 'Fabrica' as one of the KEY dates. So I would literally write a list of dates and next to them just simply write the key event in short terms, like, 1861 - Germ Theory published or 1798 - Jenner publishes smallpox findings. I would do this for each time period (ALL limited to ONE flashcard each) and then before going into the exam, I would only have these flashcards on me and I would flick through them, cementing the dates into my head. Obviously, for this little trick to work, you need to know the events, like you need to know WHY the events were significant and what Germ Theory actually is. Let me know if you have any questions or are confused, I explained this really badly haha.
This is great help, thank you so much!
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sophiedancer20
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(Original post by TheHistoryNerd_)
Hey there! Year 12 here. For my gcse mocks (since I didn't actually get to sit the real thing) I made flashcards but useful flashcards. Let me explain haha. So, for example, one topic I studied was history of medicine. For History of Medicine, I made a flashcard for each subtopic. So I would have one flashcard for medieval med, one for renaissance, one for 18thc etc.... On each card I would write the KEY KEY dates in the topic, so for example, in Renaissance medicine I would write 1543 - Andreas Vesalius published 'Fabrica' as one of the KEY dates. So I would literally write a list of dates and next to them just simply write the key event in short terms, like, 1861 - Germ Theory published or 1798 - Jenner publishes smallpox findings. I would do this for each time period (ALL limited to ONE flashcard each) and then before going into the exam, I would only have these flashcards on me and I would flick through them, cementing the dates into my head. Obviously, for this little trick to work, you need to know the events, like you need to know WHY the events were significant and what Germ Theory actually is. Let me know if you have any questions or are confused, I explained this really badly haha.
This is great help, thank you so much!

(Original post by wastedcuriosity)
I did both A-Level and GCSE History
What worked best for me was starting off with simple timelines, just the date and briefly what happened, then I did some more in detail ones.
I also stuck loads of post-it notes around the house with dates and what happened - places where I'd see them everyday, like my mirror, opposite the loo (lol), on the fridge, etc etc.
Mind maps are also very very helpful, as well as Quizlet. I think I had about 600 flashcards, that I got parents and friends to test me on most days
Most important thing you need to do is essay plans. And even better, then writing these essays in exam conditions
Okay, thank you, I will keep that in mind!
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sophiedancer20
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(Original post by TheHistoryNerd_)
Hey there! Year 12 here. For my gcse mocks (since I didn't actually get to sit the real thing) I made flashcards but useful flashcards. Let me explain haha. So, for example, one topic I studied was history of medicine. For History of Medicine, I made a flashcard for each subtopic. So I would have one flashcard for medieval med, one for renaissance, one for 18thc etc.... On each card I would write the KEY KEY dates in the topic, so for example, in Renaissance medicine I would write 1543 - Andreas Vesalius published 'Fabrica' as one of the KEY dates. So I would literally write a list of dates and next to them just simply write the key event in short terms, like, 1861 - Germ Theory published or 1798 - Jenner publishes smallpox findings. I would do this for each time period (ALL limited to ONE flashcard each) and then before going into the exam, I would only have these flashcards on me and I would flick through them, cementing the dates into my head. Obviously, for this little trick to work, you need to know the events, like you need to know WHY the events were significant and what Germ Theory actually is. Let me know if you have any questions or are confused, I explained this really badly haha.
This is great help, thank you so much!

(Original post by wastedcuriosity)
I did both A-Level and GCSE History
What worked best for me was starting off with simple timelines, just the date and briefly what happened, then I did some more in detail ones.
I also stuck loads of post-it notes around the house with dates and what happened - places where I'd see them everyday, like my mirror, opposite the loo (lol), on the fridge, etc etc.
Mind maps are also very very helpful, as well as Quizlet. I think I had about 600 flashcards, that I got parents and friends to test me on most days
Most important thing you need to do is essay plans. And even better, then writing these essays in exam conditions
Okay, thank you, I will keep that in mind!

(Original post by pikapanda05)
Hi, I'm taking my GCSE exams the same year as you! I'm doing Germany, Elizabethan England and Conflict in Asia. My teacher recommended that we wrote a draft of key things that happened and then make a timeline. She also told us to write a list of questions that could appear on the test and try and answer them, because the exams boards try to trick you out with the wording of the questions and applying your knowledge to interpretations. Hope this helps and if you need any more advice, please feel free to message me
Hey, I am doing Germany, Anglo-Saxons and American West which could put me to sleep, lol. You have given me some great advice, thank you!
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sophiedancer20
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(Original post by TheHistoryNerd_)
Hey there! Year 12 here. For my gcse mocks (since I didn't actually get to sit the real thing) I made flashcards but useful flashcards. Let me explain haha. So, for example, one topic I studied was history of medicine. For History of Medicine, I made a flashcard for each subtopic. So I would have one flashcard for medieval med, one for renaissance, one for 18thc etc.... On each card I would write the KEY KEY dates in the topic, so for example, in Renaissance medicine I would write 1543 - Andreas Vesalius published 'Fabrica' as one of the KEY dates. So I would literally write a list of dates and next to them just simply write the key event in short terms, like, 1861 - Germ Theory published or 1798 - Jenner publishes smallpox findings. I would do this for each time period (ALL limited to ONE flashcard each) and then before going into the exam, I would only have these flashcards on me and I would flick through them, cementing the dates into my head. Obviously, for this little trick to work, you need to know the events, like you need to know WHY the events were significant and what Germ Theory actually is. Let me know if you have any questions or are confused, I explained this really badly haha.
This is great help, thank you so much!

(Original post by wastedcuriosity)
I did both A-Level and GCSE History
What worked best for me was starting off with simple timelines, just the date and briefly what happened, then I did some more in detail ones.
I also stuck loads of post-it notes around the house with dates and what happened - places where I'd see them everyday, like my mirror, opposite the loo (lol), on the fridge, etc etc.
Mind maps are also very very helpful, as well as Quizlet. I think I had about 600 flashcards, that I got parents and friends to test me on most days
Most important thing you need to do is essay plans. And even better, then writing these essays in exam conditions
Okay, thank you, I will keep that in mind!

(Original post by pikapanda05)
Hi, I'm taking my GCSE exams the same year as you! I'm doing Germany, Elizabethan England and Conflict in Asia. My teacher recommended that we wrote a draft of key things that happened and then make a timeline. She also told us to write a list of questions that could appear on the test and try and answer them, because the exams boards try to trick you out with the wording of the questions and applying your knowledge to interpretations. Hope this helps and if you need any more advice, please feel free to message me
Hey, I am doing Germany, Anglo-Saxons and American West which could put me to sleep, lol. You have given me some great advice, thank you!

(Original post by archpowered)
Hi, like many have said, I would do large chronological timelines colour coded by factors (economic, political, social ect) In my room over my bed so it was there when i woke Up . I would then also do essay plans for every potential essay that could come up, my teacher gave me a 62 page document for all the units we did. I then just memorised those plans, and changed aspects according to the question in the mock/exam/practice paper I sat. I ended up with a high grade 8
Thank you for the advice, I will take that into account. The post-it notes are a great idea! Well done on a high grade 8, that's incredible!
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