Varaa
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Hi, I am currently in my second year of studying a national extended diploma in computer engineering and VR development. I had the tunnel vision of going onto university to study a cyber security course (still interested in this field). However, I am starting to realise how advantageous a degree apprenticeship can be due to the valuable experience it gives you unlike a degree.

Therefore, I am wondering which would be the best option for me. To either go to BCU, UO Warwick, Aston to study a BSc Cyber security. Or on the other hand, try and find a degree apprenticeship.

If the second option, where is the best place to find companies offering this scheme as I have only came across three in the whole of England.
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AcseI
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(Original post by Varaa)
If the second option, where is the best place to find companies offering this scheme as I have only came across three in the whole of England.
You've pretty much hit on the main reason a lot of people still opt for uni over apprenticeships. Availability.

Apprenticeships on the whole are super appealing. Get paid (even if the pay can be a bit rubbish) while also learning skills, and in some cases getting transferable qualifications. However the number of options you have is often far more limited, compared to countless degree places. This often makes a degree the path of least resistance, simply because you have better odds of getting a place.

I'd be a bit careful with assuming a degree doesn't give you valuable experience. From a work experience perspective, you have the opportunity to do a placement year, some universities offer additional placement opportunities, summer internships are a thing and nothing stops you getting a part time job to build soft skills. I recently graduated from a degree in Cyber Security and Digital Forensics, and in total had around 7 years of experience prior to starting my graduate job. That's divided among part time retail work, university ambassador work, and industry relevant work. This is above average, but there are plenty of opportunities during a degree to get experience. You have to work for them though, and this is where the "path of least resistance" idea falls apart a little. Apprenticeships package everything up neatly, whereas the expectation with degrees is that you'll put in the effort yourself.

As always, there's no right answer. There are many paths which could lead to your goal. The best thing to do will be to draw up a comprehensive list of benefits and drawbacks to each option, considering your own personal circumstances. Then make a decision, but don't overthink making the "perfect" decision.
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Varaa
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(Original post by AcseI)
You've pretty much hit on the main reason a lot of people still opt for uni over apprenticeships. Availability.

Apprenticeships on the whole are super appealing. Get paid (even if the pay can be a bit rubbish) while also learning skills, and in some cases getting transferable qualifications. However the number of options you have is often far more limited, compared to countless degree places. This often makes a degree the path of least resistance, simply because you have better odds of getting a place.

I'd be a bit careful with assuming a degree doesn't give you valuable experience. From a work experience perspective, you have the opportunity to do a placement year, some universities offer additional placement opportunities, summer internships are a thing and nothing stops you getting a part time job to build soft skills. I recently graduated from a degree in Cyber Security and Digital Forensics, and in total had around 7 years of experience prior to starting my graduate job. That's divided among part time retail work, university ambassador work, and industry relevant work. This is above average, but there are plenty of opportunities during a degree to get experience. You have to work for them though, and this is where the "path of least resistance" idea falls apart a little. Apprenticeships package everything up neatly, whereas the expectation with degrees is that you'll put in the effort yourself.

As always, there's no right answer. There are many paths which could lead to your goal. The best thing to do will be to draw up a comprehensive list of benefits and drawbacks to each option, considering your own personal circumstances. Then make a decision, but don't overthink making the "perfect" decision.
Thank you for this it was extremely helpful. May I ask where you studied your degree at? I am looking into doing a Bsc in cyber security or a very similar course, but its came to my knowledge that ones recognised by GCHQ are more credited? Therefore, my only local option for that is Warwick university which I may have to do something extra as I am not coming from A levels, would this be worth it?
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AcseI
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(Original post by Varaa)
Thank you for this it was extremely helpful. May I ask where you studied your degree at? I am looking into doing a Bsc in cyber security or a very similar course, but its came to my knowledge that ones recognised by GCHQ are more credited? Therefore, my only local option for that is Warwick university which I may have to do something extra as I am not coming from A levels, would this be worth it?
I'll drop you a message with details
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