Honestly what is the big deal about wearing masks whenever you are out?

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
It’s not like you have to wear it at home 24/7, and definitely wearing a mask does not make you become a criminal that will go rob shops. I seriously don’t get why people are still debating about masks.

It’s not even going to suffocate you to death. Doctors wear it all the time and they are still alive and well. So either you “can’t breathe” now or won’t be able to breathe in the future/forever.

It protects other people and yourself when most people wear masks on the streets. On the other hand, wearing a mask does not mean you’re completely immune. Basic hygiene and cleaning habits also count.

I’m just wondering how many more waves do we have to have in order for people to change their habits and accept that this will be a part of our lives until there’s a vaccine/cure and that wearing a mask should not be stigmatized. Instead, it is just a common practice to prevent infectious diseases from spreading and not only ill people should wear it in times of an epidemic/pandemic.

Freshers flu will no longer be a huge thing if people actually wear masks to avoid spreading it to others and stay home if they are sick.
11
reply
SuperiorPotato
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
I guess some people find it suffocating, difficult to breath in or just too hot but honestly I don't get it either :/
5
reply
Mesopotamian.
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Most people I've seen are actually wearing masks where they should in all honesty, I think the bigger problem is those who think it's a good idea to have parties with 50+ people - that does wonders in spreading any infectious agent quickly, let alone Covid-19...
6
reply
SuperiorPotato
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
Some people also think it's not "cool" or "trendy" to wear a mask :lolwut: This is not a fashion show honey it's a pandemic and your health at risk
3
reply
deadroseex
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
I can't wear one. As soon as I try to put them on, my head starts to hurt and I struggle to breath. I don't know why? I have tried loads of masks and different things, but it just doesn't work for me. Wherever I have to I do put it on though!
0
reply
donnyF
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
cases have gone up since they were made.mandatory. it's not about a virus, it's about control.
0
reply
McGinger
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by donnyF)
it's not about a virus, it's about control.
Do grow up.
13
reply
Anonymous #1
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
Most people I've seen are actually wearing masks where they should in all honesty, I think the bigger problem is those who think it's a good idea to have parties with 50+ people - that does wonders in spreading any infectious agent quickly, let alone Covid-19...
That is the problem too, I agree. But from what I see (I’m in York rn) the streets are full of people and I can barely see any social distancing going on there. I think it’s time to step it up further and wear masks on the streets because outdoor spaces are not as ‘well-ventilated’ as people thought. It is counter-productive to have people take off masks once they are out of public transport/shopping areas, as they will be in contact with viruses and bacteria when they handle/store masks improperly. Plus, with the crowded streets it’s just similar to parties with 50+ people not wear masks.
0
reply
sulcata3000
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
amen sista
2
reply
Anonymous #1
#10
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by donnyF)
cases have gone up since they were made.mandatory. it's not about a virus, it's about control.
I guess some people will die fighting for freedom and liberty then?
0
reply
Mesopotamian.
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by Anonymous)
That is the problem too, I agree. But from what I see (I’m in York rn) the streets are full of people and I can barely see any social distancing going on there. I think it’s time to step it up further and wear masks on the streets because outdoor spaces are not as ‘well-ventilated’ as people thought. It is counter-productive to have people take off masks once they are out of public transport/shopping areas, as they will be in contact with viruses and bacteria when they handle/store masks improperly. Plus, with the crowded streets it’s just similar to parties with 50+ people not wear masks.
Realistically speaking, you won't catch the virus just by walking past someone unless they are positive for the virus and spit/ cough/ sneeze on you and you breathe those droplets in - that's the reason for the 2m distance rule.
Breathing oxygen is good for your brain and health so making mask-wearing outside mandatory would not be my ideal solution.
I think the government should focus on public education similar to the swine flue pandemic of "catch it, bin it, kill it" - i.e. if you are going to sneeze/ cough etc, don't do it in open air. Have a tissue ready or even the crook of your arm and then dispose of it and wash/ sanitise your hands.
I've seen so many people sneeze or cough in air without bothering to cover up - and actually even if you are wearing a mask, you'll still be spreading it, because most people don't wear masks which are very effective (you'd have to use an FFP3 or other high grade mask to really limit risk, which obviously most people don't) - also a lot of people don't wear their mask correctly which renders it useless
Last edited by Mesopotamian.; 1 month ago
1
reply
Anonymous #1
#12
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
Realistically speaking, you won't catch the virus just by walking past someone unless they are positive for the virus and spit/ cough/ sneeze on you and you breathe those droplets in - that's the reason for the 2m distance rule.
Breathing oxygen is good for your brain and health so making mask-wearing outside mandatory would not be my ideal solution.
I think the government should focus on public education similar to the swine flue pandemic of "catch it, bin it, kill it" - i.e. if you are going to sneeze/ cough etc, don't do it in open air. Have a tissue ready or even the crook of your arm and then dispose of it and wash/ sanitise your hands.
I've seen so many people sneeze or cough in air without bothering to cover up - and actually even if you are wearing a mask, you'll still be spreading it, because most people don't wear masks which are very effective (you'd have to use an FFP3 or other high grade mask to really limit risk, which obviously most people don't) - also a lot of people don't wear their mask correctly which renders it useless
It’s not about just catching the virus from people who are sneezing/coughing. Just ‘catch, bin, and kill’ won’t be enough for Covid-19. There are asymptomatic carriers for Covid-19 which changes the game. There’s a chance that diseases will spread through talking face-to-face without any barriers - which increases risk in crowded streets.

Another fundamental problem is the requirements of face coverings and education I guess. Like you said, till this day a lot of people do not handle/wear masks correctly - covering the nose and mouth, avoid touching the outside of the mask, sanitize before and after handling your mask. In most Asian countries, they generally are taught to buy and use masks that are at least protective against the virus particles. Not necessarily an N95, but surgical masks. However, I do believe that a change in attitude towards face coverings can be a useful first step.

It’s just that in a lot of more rural parts of the UK, unfortunately, people are still skeptical about mask wearing and only reluctantly and incorrectly wear it in shops/public transport. This renders the policy useless when they don’t wear it correctly and treat it seriously.

As second wave is coming, I just hope that people can be more aware of this I do want the situation to be controlled and hopefully life will return normal soon...
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
Realistically speaking, you won't catch the virus just by walking past someone unless they are positive for the virus and spit/ cough/ sneeze on you and you breathe those droplets in - that's the reason for the 2m distance rule.
Breathing oxygen is good for your brain and health so making mask-wearing outside mandatory would not be my ideal solution.
I think the government should focus on public education similar to the swine flue pandemic of "catch it, bin it, kill it" - i.e. if you are going to sneeze/ cough etc, don't do it in open air. Have a tissue ready or even the crook of your arm and then dispose of it and wash/ sanitise your hands.
I've seen so many people sneeze or cough in air without bothering to cover up - and actually even if you are wearing a mask, you'll still be spreading it, because most people don't wear masks which are very effective (you'd have to use an FFP3 or other high grade mask to really limit risk, which obviously most people don't) - also a lot of people don't wear their mask correctly which renders it useless
I guess this article sums it up:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-52015486
0
reply
Mesopotamian.
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by Anonymous)
I guess this article sums it up:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-52015486
I don’t understand why you’ve shown me this article?

The spread of infection is dependant on many factors such as the load and virulence factor etc. Technically speaking, a lot of infectious diseases could be spread by talking - because talking can create aerosols which carry the virus. However the risk of being infected via someone talking to you is unlikely due to the factors I’ve mentioned. If you can show me solid research which provides evidence that Covid-19 can be spread by asymptomatic people simply talking then I’ll happily change my stance, but until then, I’m unconvinced mask wearing will have much, if any, effect in the situation you’ve described.

I’m in no way against mask-wearing (in fact I’m wearing one right now as I type this) but there are some situations where masks are unlikely to have much of an effect, if any, and being outdoors in open air is one of those (obviously being coughed or sneezed at is a separate story).
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#15
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
I don’t understand why you’ve shown me this article?

The spread of infection is dependant on many factors such as the load and virulence factor etc. Technically speaking, a lot of infectious diseases could be spread by talking - because talking can create aerosols which carry the virus. However the risk of being infected via someone talking to you is unlikely due to the factors I’ve mentioned. If you can show me solid research which provides evidence that Covid-19 can be spread by asymptomatic people simply talking then I’ll happily change my stance, but until then, I’m unconvinced mask wearing will have much, if any, effect in the situation you’ve described.

I’m in no way against mask-wearing (in fact I’m wearing one right now as I type this) but there are some situations where masks are unlikely to have much of an effect, if any, and being outdoors in open air is one of those (obviously being coughed or sneezed at is a separate story).

For Covid-19, there is an incubation period of up to 14 days. During those 14 days there won’t be any symptoms, which makes community transmission hard to contain even with track and trace when more and more people get infected.

Asymptomatic transmission can be referred to presymptomatic transmission of Sars-Cov-2 research, but in itself there are quite a few that talks about asymptomatic transmission too. This includes:

Furukawa, N. W., Brooks, J. T., & Sobel, J. (2020). Evidence supporting transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 while presymptomatic or asymptomatic. Emerging infectious diseases, 26(7).

Gandhi, M., Yokoe, D. S., & Havlir, D. V. (2020). Asymptomatic transmission, the Achilles’ heel of current strategies to control COVID-19.

The article above briefly touches on the difference in attitude towards mask-wearing in East Asia versus the West. It is mainly due to them having experienced SARS in 2003, which makes such a drastic difference in people’s response to Covid-19 and mask-wearing. To sum it up, they will sacrifice their temporary “ability to breathe” for the long-term benefit of making the pandemic end sooner. And so far if you look at the statistics I would say what they are doing is working. Hence why I am suggesting this and bring it up here.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#16
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#16
*bringing
0
reply
Surnia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by Anonymous)
It’s just that in a lot of more rural parts of the UK, unfortunately, people are still skeptical about mask wearing and only reluctantly and incorrectly wear it in shops/public transport. This renders the policy useless when they don’t wear it correctly and treat it seriously.
Where's your evidence for this? I'm seeing lockdown in cities, not rural areas, and personal experience says people are wearing masks, and correctly. Where else is the problem about where they supposed to wear masks other than shops and public transport?
0
reply
Mesopotamian.
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by Anonymous)
For Covid-19, there is an incubation period of up to 14 days. During those 14 days there won’t be any symptoms, which makes community transmission hard to contain even with track and trace when more and more people get infected.

Asymptomatic transmission can be referred to presymptomatic transmission of Sars-Cov-2 research, but in itself there are quite a few that talks about asymptomatic transmission too. This includes:

Furukawa, N. W., Brooks, J. T., & Sobel, J. (2020). Evidence supporting transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 while presymptomatic or asymptomatic. Emerging infectious diseases, 26(7).

Gandhi, M., Yokoe, D. S., & Havlir, D. V. (2020). Asymptomatic transmission, the Achilles’ heel of current strategies to control COVID-19.

The article above briefly touches on the difference in attitude towards mask-wearing in East Asia versus the West. It is mainly due to them having experienced SARS in 2003, which makes such a drastic difference in people’s response to Covid-19 and mask-wearing. To sum it up, they will sacrifice their temporary “ability to breathe” for the long-term benefit of making the pandemic end sooner. And so far if you look at the statistics I would say what they are doing is working. Hence why I am suggesting this and bring it up here.
I am fully aware of the incubation period for Covid-19. You seem to think I'm refuting asymptomatic spread - I am not. I said that there is no evidence (that I am aware of) that simply talking can spread the virus (asymptomatically). As I've already pointed out, becoming infected with any pathogenic agent is dependant on several factors such as transmissibility, infectivity and invasiveness. For respiratory spread in particular which is relevant to Covid-19, it depends on infective discharge and aerosol droplet size additionally - how big are aerosol droplets produced when talking, and what is the infective discharge?

This is in response to your suggestion that mask wearing should be mandatory at all times outside, including open air spaces, because you think people can spread Covid-19 through talking.
My point is, unless evidence comes to light that Covid-19 is spread via talking, then I do not support that suggestion.

Furthermore, the first piece of research says "First, the incidence of asymptomatic compared with symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection needs to be determined" - yes that would be a good idea. It then also goes on to say "Second, given that a large proportion of infections probably result from transmission from asymptomatic or presymptomatic persons" - the world "probably" means nothing in the scientific world and is just an assumption until further evidence comes to light I'm afraid. This article talks a lot about asymptomatic spread, but doesn't mention specific mechanisms.

The second article is more promising, as it discusses "shedding" which is true enough and mentions some of the factors I was referring to. However again, asymptomatic spread via shedding is not the same as talking, (asymptomatic persons could touch their face/mouth which transfers sheddings onto their hands which they then go on to touch something else, somebody else than touches that object and becomes infected etc etc.).

More research is needed to find out whether Covid-19 can be spread via talking before implementing laws to address that, is my point.
0
reply
xsowmix
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 month ago
#19
(Original post by donnyF)
cases have gone up since they were made.mandatory. it's not about a virus, it's about control.
wow. the idiocy.
0
reply
xsowmix
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 month ago
#20
(Original post by deadroseex)
I can't wear one. As soon as I try to put them on, my head starts to hurt and I struggle to breath. I don't know why? I have tried loads of masks and different things, but it just doesn't work for me. Wherever I have to I do put it on though!
I have the same problem as well because of my asthma. Try the silk ones, they are a bit more breathable.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (176)
14.52%
I'm not sure (56)
4.62%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (355)
29.29%
I have already dropped out (35)
2.89%
I'm not a current university student (590)
48.68%

Watched Threads

View All