success4life
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How many days of uni do you do a week (average)
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martinaa098
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(Original post by success4life)
How many days of uni do you do a week (average)
I have lessons like 3 times a week, but it really depends on what uni you go to. And you have to go in for stuff like practicals too. Like 7 times a term
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f.ga010301
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(Original post by success4life)
How many days of uni do you do a week (average)
Hi, I study biomedical science at London met.

during my foundation year, I had three days of uni but they were full days. next year I believe I have two full days on uni. However with things being online, this might be different.

it really depends uni to uni and of course schedules for them too.

I hope this helps!
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success4life
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(Original post by f.ga010301)
Hi, I study biomedical science at London met.

during my foundation year, I had three days of uni but they were full days. next year I believe I have two full days on uni. However with things being online, this might be different.

it really depends uni to uni and of course schedules for them too.

I hope this helps!
It definitely does. Thank you
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artful_lounger
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It will vary enormously between universities and may well vary year on year depending how they timetable things. Also the number of days you have to go into uni doesn't necessarily indicate how much you'll be doing while there...while I wasn't doing BMS, I've had terms where my timetable had timetabled hours every day of the week, but quite a few days it would just be a one or two lectures and nothing else for the rest of the day. Other terms I've had only a couple days a week where I had to be "in" for timetabled hours but they ended up being like 5 hour blocks of back to back lectures. Most universities don't have "fixed" timetables year on year so you won't really know until they release the provisional timetable shortly before the start of term.

That said you will be expected to commit a fair amount of time outside of timetabled hours, and the general sense is that you should be spending about the same amount of time on your studies as you would on a full time job, so probably an average of 30-40 hours a week (including timetabled hours). Obviously though a lot of that is non-timetabled and depending on your course you may have a lot of leeway to vary your "effort" across the term dependent on coursework submission dates etc, so you probably won't be regularly spending that much time every week (but you will probably make up for the "light" weeks with more intensive work in the run up to deadlines or exams).
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success4life
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It will vary enormously between universities and may well vary year on year depending how they timetable things. Also the number of days you have to go into uni doesn't necessarily indicate how much you'll be doing while there...while I wasn't doing BMS, I've had terms where my timetable had timetabled hours every day of the week, but quite a few days it would just be a one or two lectures and nothing else for the rest of the day. Other terms I've had only a couple days a week where I had to be "in" for timetabled hours but they ended up being like 5 hour blocks of back to back lectures. Most universities don't have "fixed" timetables year on year so you won't really know until they release the provisional timetable shortly before the start of term.

That said you will be expected to commit a fair amount of time outside of timetabled hours, and the general sense is that you should be spending about the same amount of time on your studies as you would on a full time job, so probably an average of 30-40 hours a week (including timetabled hours). Obviously though a lot of that is non-timetabled and depending on your course you may have a lot of leeway to vary your "effort" across the term dependent on coursework submission dates etc, so you probably won't be regularly spending that much time every week (but you will probably make up for the "light" weeks with more intensive work in the run up to deadlines or exams).
Understood. Thank you:
How did it work without an ibms. I thought my course didn’t do it and I didn’t know what to do but they all do so how can you won’t around that x
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by success4life)
Understood. Thank you:
How did it work without an ibms. I thought my course didn’t do it and I didn’t know what to do but they all do so how can you won’t around that x
No I mean, I was doing a different subject, not biomedical sciences (BMS). I was studying engineering.

I'm not sure what you are referring to about the IBMS. It is the accrediting body for biomedical scientists and critically is a requirement if you want to work as a BMS in the NHS.
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success4life
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
No I mean, I was doing a different subject, not biomedical sciences (BMS). I was studying engineering.

I'm not sure what you are referring to about the IBMS. It is the accrediting body for biomedical scientists and critically is a requirement if you want to work as a BMS in the NHS.
No no I meant I thought my course didn’t offer it and I’ve heard people say that it can leave you with limit career options. Thankfully I found out the course was ibms accredited.
I suppose it depends on the job you want. What’s it like to study engineering, what do you learn-module Wise
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by success4life)
No no I meant I thought my course didn’t offer it and I’ve heard people say that it can leave you with limit career options. Thankfully I found out the course was ibms accredited.
I suppose it depends on the job you want. What’s it like to study engineering, what do you learn-module Wise
I found engineering incredibly tedious and realised I made the wrong choice, which is why I'm not studying it anymore It's mostly just extensions of the maths and physics you do at A-level, you learn more mathematical methods similar to the style of A-level Maths and apply it to various physical systems to model them (and then you use this to design engineered systems, which may or may not get built and tested experimentally). If you like solving differential equations day in and day out it's not too bad, although as I found out that alone isn't really enough to sustain one through it (since I enjoyed doing that, I just found the material we were solving the problems for very boring and mundane).

Also yes, not having an IBMS accredited BMS degree can limit your options if you wanted to subsequently work in the NHS as a BMS specifically. If that wasn't something you wanted to do then it wouldn't make any difference. Also even if that is what you want to do, IBMS accreditation alone isn't enough; you also need to register with the HCPC, which requires you complete a professional portfolio in an approved NHS pathology lab (e.g. through a placement year). The placement are very competitive for students on BMS degrees, and if you don't do it during the degree you need to look at Band 2 MLA roles in such approved labs and get your manager to agree to allow you to work on your portfolio while you are working in that role. A lot more hassle, essentially. The best course for going into the NHS to work as BMS is the Healthcare Sciences (Life Sciences) courses, which are part of the NHS Practitioner Training Programme (PTP), which include the placements integrated into the course allowing you to graduate with an IBMS accredited degree and eligible to register with the HCPC on graduation, and thus apply to Band 5 BMS roles immediately.
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success4life
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I found engineering incredibly tedious and realised I made the wrong choice, which is why I'm not studying it anymore It's mostly just extensions of the maths and physics you do at A-level, you learn more mathematical methods similar to the style of A-level Maths and apply it to various physical systems to model them (and then you use this to design engineered systems, which may or may not get built and tested experimentally). If you like solving differential equations day in and day out it's not too bad, although as I found out that alone isn't really enough to sustain one through it (since I enjoyed doing that, I just found the material we were solving the problems for very boring and mundane).

Also yes, not having an IBMS accredited BMS degree can limit your options if you wanted to subsequently work in the NHS as a BMS specifically. If that wasn't something you wanted to do then it wouldn't make any difference. Also even if that is what you want to do, IBMS accreditation alone isn't enough; you also need to register with the HCPC, which requires you complete a professional portfolio in an approved NHS pathology lab (e.g. through a placement year). The placement are very competitive for students on BMS degrees, and if you don't do it during the degree you need to look at Band 2 MLA roles in such approved labs and get your manager to agree to allow you to work on your portfolio while you are working in that role. A lot more hassle, essentially. The best course for going into the NHS to work as BMS is the Healthcare Sciences (Life Sciences) courses, which are part of the NHS Practitioner Training Programme (PTP), which include the placements integrated into the course allowing you to graduate with an IBMS accredited degree and eligible to register with the HCPC on graduation, and thus apply to Band 5 BMS roles immediately.
I see! Thank you for that.
It’s something I’m think of but not my goal. I’d like to teach with a biomedical degree, but I could go into it before going into teaching you see.
How would I know whether the course is PTP and the rest of what you’ve said.

Can I not just work in my portfolio whilst at the uni I’m going to then register after to do it ?? Or are you saying it will look better to those who have a placement as they stand out??
If so a few of my course do do a placement. It’s always an option. Thank for taking the time!!
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success4life
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I found engineering incredibly tedious and realised I made the wrong choice, which is why I'm not studying it anymore It's mostly just extensions of the maths and physics you do at A-level, you learn more mathematical methods similar to the style of A-level Maths and apply it to various physical systems to model them (and then you use this to design engineered systems, which may or may not get built and tested experimentally). If you like solving differential equations day in and day out it's not too bad, although as I found out that alone isn't really enough to sustain one through it (since I enjoyed doing that, I just found the material we were solving the problems for very boring and mundane).

Also yes, not having an IBMS accredited BMS degree can limit your options if you wanted to subsequently work in the NHS as a BMS specifically. If that wasn't something you wanted to do then it wouldn't make any difference. Also even if that is what you want to do, IBMS accreditation alone isn't enough; you also need to register with the HCPC, which requires you complete a professional portfolio in an approved NHS pathology lab (e.g. through a placement year). The placement are very competitive for students on BMS degrees, and if you don't do it during the degree you need to look at Band 2 MLA roles in such approved labs and get your manager to agree to allow you to work on your portfolio while you are working in that role. A lot more hassle, essentially. The best course for going into the NHS to work as BMS is the Healthcare Sciences (Life Sciences) courses, which are part of the NHS Practitioner Training Programme (PTP), which include the placements integrated into the course allowing you to graduate with an IBMS accredited degree and eligible to register with the HCPC on graduation, and thus apply to Band 5 BMS roles immediately.
I’ve just had a look at one of the universities and it says one of the modules -practical and professional portfolio but this one doesn’t mention placement.


The other says the course will help put me on “pallid biomedical science route” at the university.
To do a 14 week clinical placement and also portfolio so I can register with hcpc.

The other course doesn’t mention much (Can it be assumed it’s the same or does the portfolio?)

The other isn’t for biomedical science it’s a back up, biological science.

The last and final talks about a research placement and does mention another work placement. This doesn’t mention portfolio. Does that mean we don’t do it?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by success4life)
I see! Thank you for that.
It’s something I’m think of but not my goal. I’d like to teach with a biomedical degree, but I could go into it before going into teaching you see.
How would I know whether the course is PTP and the rest of what you’ve said.

Can I not just work in my portfolio whilst at the uni I’m going to then register after to do it ?? Or are you saying it will look better to those who have a placement as they stand out??
If so a few of my course do do a placement. It’s always an option. Thank for taking the time!!
All courses that are part of the PTP are listed here: https://nshcs.hee.nhs.uk/services/ac...ic-programmes/

Note however only the life sciences streams prepare to work as a biomedical scientist (so life sciences, cellular sciences, blood sciences, infection sciences or genetic sciences). The PTP does include other streams preparing for other areas (e.g. to work as a physiologist or clinical engineer) which aren't relevant to pursuing a career as a BMS in the NHS. Also be aware that not all those listed will be recruiting for their courses every year (or potentially at all).

For the portfolio you have to do it in a placement or while working, because it has to be done in an approved NHS pathology lab. You can't complete it in any other setting and the only ways you will be working in such a lab where you can do the portfolio is either during a placement or by working as an MLA after graduating. It's not a question of standing out, just about making sure you tick all the necessary boxes. If you haven't complete the portfolio and registered with the HCPC you can't apply to Band 5 BMS roles. Also you need NHS experience to apply above Band 2 or Band 3 (I forget which) anyway.

(Original post by success4life)
I’ve just had a look at one of the universities and it says one of the modules -practical and professional portfolio but this one doesn’t mention placement.


The other says the course will help put me on “pallid biomedical science route” at the university.
To do a 14 week clinical placement and also portfolio so I can register with hcpc.

The other course doesn’t mention much (Can it be assumed it’s the same or does the portfolio?)

The other isn’t for biomedical science it’s a back up, biological science.

The last and final talks about a research placement and does mention another work placement. This doesn’t mention portfolio. Does that mean we don’t do it?
The applied BMS route would be the one you want to go. It doesn't sound like the others would allow you to register with the HCPC on graduation. If you aren't sure though, speak with your director of studies or personal tutor, as they will know exactly what is offered by your particular uni - it may be there are other routes to the same goal as well in the course, although it sounds to me the applied BMS course with placement is the only one,
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success4life
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
All courses that are part of the PTP are listed here: https://nshcs.hee.nhs.uk/services/ac...ic-programmes/

Note however only the life sciences streams prepare to work as a biomedical scientist (so life sciences, cellular sciences, blood sciences, infection sciences or genetic sciences). The PTP does include other streams preparing for other areas (e.g. to work as a physiologist or clinical engineer) which aren't relevant to pursuing a career as a BMS in the NHS. Also be aware that not all those listed will be recruiting for their courses every year (or potentially at all).

For the portfolio you have to do it in a placement or while working, because it has to be done in an approved NHS pathology lab. You can't complete it in any other setting and the only ways you will be working in such a lab where you can do the portfolio is either during a placement or by working as an MLA after graduating. It's not a question of standing out, just about making sure you tick all the necessary boxes. If you haven't complete the portfolio and registered with the HCPC you can't apply to Band 5 BMS roles. Also you need NHS experience to apply above Band 2 or Band 3 (I forget which) anyway.



The applied BMS route would be the one you want to go. It doesn't sound like the others would allow you to register with the HCPC on graduation. If you aren't sure though, speak with your director of studies or personal tutor, as they will know exactly what is offered by your particular uni - it may be there are other routes to the same goal as well in the course, although it sounds to me the applied BMS course with placement is the only one,
So if I get the placement and portfolio I can do a band 5 rather than band 2.
I’ll have a look at which unis do the placement And which unis do the applied biomedical course
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by success4life)
So if I get the placement and portfolio I can do a band 5 rather than band 2.
I’ll have a look at which unis do the placement And which unis do the applied biomedical course
Provided you can get onto the placement, usually spaces on the placements aren't guaranteed, except for the Healthcare Sciences (Life Sciences) courses. The degree also needs to be IBMS accredited as well as giving you eligibility for HCPC registration by graduation (by completing the portfolio on placement) to be able to apply directly to Band 5 BMS roles.
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