A-Level Maths, Computer Science and Economics

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CyanideX
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Hey so I want to become an ethical hacker, or maybe even a software engineer, not so certain right now, but definitely something in the Computer Science field. The issue I am facing is that I really wanted to, and was prepared to, do A level physics. However, because my teacher gave me a 6 instead of 7 (when I was getting 7s in my mocks), I had to choose something else, and therefore I chose economics. I still feel pretty depressed about it since I really loved physics and I feel like I might possibly want to do something physics-based in the future (as in my own business). I have tried appealing but they never actually looked into it. Would economics still be alright for Unis that do Computer Science? Thank you
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Sarvienn
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Hey, if you can actually choose another subject, and you're sure of studying computer science then I'd definitely advise taking Further maths. Some unis dont really like computer science as an A Level subject too.. But it depends on the uni you're applying to and what they think about the subject combination. However, in your position, I'd take Further maths instead of economics / computer science. If you're really also interested about businesses, then I'd definitely recommend the subject combination of Maths, Further maths and econs.
This will also allow you to only focus on 2 subjects as maths and further maths revolve around the same concepts ; Further maths is just an advanced version of pure maths.

all the best
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AlphaZeta
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(Original post by Sarvienn)
Hey, if you can actually choose another subject, and you're sure of studying computer science then I'd definitely advise taking Further maths. Some unis dont really like computer science as an A Level subject too.. But it depends on the uni you're applying to and what they think about the subject combination. However, in your position, I'd take Further maths instead of economics / computer science. If you're really also interested about businesses, then I'd definitely recommend the subject combination of Maths, Further maths and econs.
This will also allow you to only focus on 2 subjects as maths and further maths revolve around the same concepts ; Further maths is just an advanced version of pure maths.

all the best
Where do you get this nonsense from?
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Sarvienn
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(Original post by AlphaZeta)
Where do you get this nonsense from?
1. Visits to university open days
2. Higher education fairs where I personally spoke to university admissions representatives
3. Higher education advisors in school.

Do not like cs as an A Level because some feel they have to reteach and fix some perspectives from the A Level. It will never disadvantage you for sure, but they'd prefer a further maths in one's subject profile. I'm assuming he's applying to the likes of oxbridge, imperial, ucl etc.
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CurryCurry2468
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(Original post by AlphaZeta)
Where do you get this nonsense from?
I would also say try and pick up FM as well as most unis see that if ur doing it u probably have good problem solving skills, resilience and can manage high workloads.

The part about CS is true but most unis dont have it as part of their entry requirements cuz they recognise it is not offered everywhere. Also if u have a maths and a science then u should be good to go but I think FM would make ur application look stronger
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AlphaZeta
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OP is considering the field of software engineering, where programming is taught at A-level (CS).
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Sarvienn
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(Original post by AlphaZeta)
OP is considering the field of software engineering, where programming is taught at A-level (CS).
The prerequisite for studying Computer science specifically mentions programming is NOT required. It is generally expected that a student will conduct INDEPENDENT study of programming and engage in their computer science interests through it. Not specifically through the A Level CS module.
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m.s124
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It doesnt sound like economics is the right subject for you as its important that you have an interest in the subjects you're taking

Explain to your teacher that you are really passionate about physics and are willing to put in extra work. You have to show them that you're capable of it if you really want to do it. Maybe teach yourself the first couple of topics and do practice questions and tell your teacher about what you've learnt?

If that doesnt work I would recommend you change Econ to furthermaths but only if your enjoy maths which im assuming you do because of your career choices.

If you do choose to stick with economics I have some resources that could be useful so let me know if you want.... same with physics!! (as I take both and am currently in year 13)
Good luck
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artful_lounger
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A-level Physics isn't required for CS degrees and outside of some electronics topics isn't hugely relevant. It is useful in terms of the transferable skills of thinking analytically and using mathematical models in solving problems, but to varying extends economics does both of those too. Provided you are confident you can get a good grade in A-level Economics it's not going to hurt your chances for admission anywhere.

As indicated above though, it would be well worth considering A-level Further Maths if it's available to you, either in place of A-level Economics or as a fourth subject along with your other subjects. CS degrees in general are generally mathematical and you will cover at least some of the FM content in the course of the degree no matter what, and FM is especially useful for the "top" CS courses (e.g. at Oxbridge, Imperial, Warwick, Edinburgh) which are extremely mathematically and theoretically oriented.

In general though, any third subject would be fine to do CS at uni, as you will have A-level Maths which is the requirement for the vast majority of CS degrees. You also have A-level CS, which while rarely required, does add a couple other unis as options (e.g. Cardiff) and may provide some useful background experience for the course (although as indicated above, FM would be better preparation than probably any A-level, after A-level Maths). So just pick for your third subject whatever you are interested in and enjoy, which will usually translate to you doing well in that subject.
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