English Language A Level Coursework - investigating use of language

Watch
mariaseal
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#1
I'm starting my A Level english language coursework but I am super lost and confused on what to do it on. I have found two tabloid articles one being describing a male murderer, one describing a female murderer. My idea was to investigate the way the media describes a female vs male murderer this fitting into language & gender then also maybe link to a bit of language & power and language & technology. Does anyone else have some useful tips if they are doing/have done a similar focus to this one?
0
reply
13Charlotte2001
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 months ago
#2
(Original post by mariaseal)
I'm starting my A Level english language coursework but I am super lost and confused on what to do it on. I have found two tabloid articles one being describing a male murderer, one describing a female murderer. My idea was to investigate the way the media describes a female vs male murderer this fitting into language & gender then also maybe link to a bit of language & power and language & technology. Does anyone else have some useful tips if they are doing/have done a similar focus to this one?
Heya my coursework was wildly different, but I thought describing how I did my own coursework might help you with yours? So I looked at two of Theresa May's speeches, her acceptance speech as Prime Minister and her resignation speech. I found a theory on the ways different political parties used language in their manifestos, and so did a qualitative analysis on how similar/different each speech was from the manifesto. The specific quantitative analysis I did was looking at the use of different pronouns. For example, the main finding was that the second person "you" pronoun was used to excess in the acceptance speech, but never used in the resignation. I linked that to the sentences "you" was in, largely promises and asserted that she no longer used "you" because she was no longer in a position to uphold promises, and had in effect failed. I also looked at the different verb types she used, ignoring auxiliaries, and did this horribly in depth look at the transitive versus intransitive verbs, basically to say that her initial speech lacked direct objects, since it was hypothetical.

All this to say, for yours, I think the first thing for you to do is to read through and annotate each of your texts looking for interesting features. For example, are more words with negative connotations used for the woman, especially if it's a crime that goes against female stereotypes? Is there any evidence of dehumanisation in them? Do they use pronouns or just their names? Do they use the criminal's own words, does the tabloid seem to view the crime as justified or truly abhorrent? Also add a really pretentious title to it (for an example, my horribly pretentious title was 'When Face is Lost: Gender, Politics and Persona in Theresa May's Language') .
Another tip is to make sure your focus has a really good foundation of theory to build from. It's really quite hard to write an introduction if your topic's quite niche- so good on you for linking language and gender + the rest immediately.
0
reply
mariaseal
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#3
(Original post by 13Charlotte2001)
Heya my coursework was wildly different, but I thought describing how I did my own coursework might help you with yours? So I looked at two of Theresa May's speeches, her acceptance speech as Prime Minister and her resignation speech. I found a theory on the ways different political parties used language in their manifestos, and so did a qualitative analysis on how similar/different each speech was from the manifesto. The specific quantitative analysis I did was looking at the use of different pronouns. For example, the main finding was that the second person "you" pronoun was used to excess in the acceptance speech, but never used in the resignation. I linked that to the sentences "you" was in, largely promises and asserted that she no longer used "you" because she was no longer in a position to uphold promises, and had in effect failed. I also looked at the different verb types she used, ignoring auxiliaries, and did this horribly in depth look at the transitive versus intransitive verbs, basically to say that her initial speech lacked direct objects, since it was hypothetical.

All this to say, for yours, I think the first thing for you to do is to read through and annotate each of your texts looking for interesting features. For example, are more words with negative connotations used for the woman, especially if it's a crime that goes against female stereotypes? Is there any evidence of dehumanisation in them? Do they use pronouns or just their names? Do they use the criminal's own words, does the tabloid seem to view the crime as justified or truly abhorrent? Also add a really pretentious title to it (for an example, my horribly pretentious title was 'When Face is Lost: Gender, Politics and Persona in Theresa May's Language') .
Another tip is to make sure your focus has a really good foundation of theory to build from. It's really quite hard to write an introduction if your topic's quite niche- so good on you for linking language and gender + the rest immediately.
Thank you so much, this is extremely helpful!! I really appreciate it.
0
reply
Abettles
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 months ago
#4
i'm doing a similar investigation to this but struggling to find a useful article for a female murderer.Which one have you used?
0
reply
tinygirl96
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 months ago
#5
This is a compare and contrast question. Read the texts carefully and highlight key words in blue. Make some notes to use as fodder. Does the crime in question committed destroy trust in females?
It helps if you have a basic understanding of criminal stereotypes for both sexes particularly for this question asks you to evaluate that in depth. You should put all information into your own words as far as possible as well. Describe exactly what happened, who was responsible etc.
Discuss the true impact of the incident on society too. Reflect on the consequences that resulted from the offence. If it was a really heinous crime, simply provide a overview of the events instead. Good luck and I hope that this is useful to you. Read beyond the lines of your texts to truly determine the true effect. Consider some different attitudes to crime in your essay in addition. Also talk about people's feelings afterwards and so on towards the offender.
Add in real life examples and provide two or three quotes. You can use a few different old newspaper articles on past crimes as a guide to help you to write your essay. Television movies and shows are another good source of decent information on crime. Watch a couple and observe what happens post crime. Holly oaks is a good one in particular but be very careful. Additionally you can even find several videos on YouTube depicting the process of justice in other countries worth viewing.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (87)
64.93%
I don't have everything I need (47)
35.07%

Watched Threads

View All