Ellie098
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Hi, I'm new to A-level psychology (I was originally doing English language but changed as I though I would find psychology much more interesting)

I just wanted to ask if anyone that does A level psychology has any documents with all the possible essay questions on. I would appreciate it massively and it would be such a great help to me.

Also if anyone has any tips for the next two years please drop them below.

THANKS
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Hellohsjakodsmka
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Ooo good luck with a level psych! You're going to love it!

You absolutely don't need to memorise the names of researchers but I used them as a fun way to revise e.g. would write the name on one side of a flashcard with questions and underneath i would draw a funny picture related to the name and the study. For example, for Loftus and Palmer (1974) I would draw a car crashing into a palm tree. This didn't always work so well if the researcher had a boring name but it was so fun to revise haha - remember you need to repeat them regularly

Try to link evaluation points together in your essays, especially if you're making a "generic" evaluation!! You don't need to make a conclusion, but imo an essay runs more smoothly if you're having an "argument with yourself" as opposed to writing every evaluation point you've memorised without considering their relative strengths and weaknesses.

I think that past paper practice is less important for psych than for bio/chem because the answers are less fixed. However, definitely do all of the research methods/application questions and make memory aids for these based on the past papers, using the textbook to fill the gaps.
The evaluations in the green haired girl textbook for some topics are sometimes lacking (they may have several generic issues and debates answers and few counter studies/ few methodological issues etc). Its okay ig but it helps to have an extra evaluation (choose a memorable one or one you can apply to a lot of questions) from another textbook - the cat book lol, a website like simply psychology or mark schemes (like I mentioned I do with biology)

Learn the difference between command words e.g. applications vs implications, discuss vs describe + evaluate), look at the mark schemes/examiner reports for these. You'll probably have some pre-planned essay structures, but practice using these plans for different essays (e.g. comparison essays vs evaluate essays).

This is sooo important, you need to get better at planning and writing longer essays bc they naturally sets you up for shorter essays and 2/4/6- mark questions, as you just need to trim away to get concise, relevant material. Practice essays often (timed) and get feedback on them.
And also i had to mention that when we would finish a topic I would write 16 mark essays for each one - then take them to your teacher and ask her to mark it and give you feedback. If you want more marks, listen to the feedback they give you, do it again and take it back to them. I remember my psych teacher got SO annoyed at me because I'd give her around 3 essays a week to mark so make sure you take it to both of your teachers because it's better to have feedback from more than one person haha

Resources:
https://www.youtube.com/c/ALevelRevision
https://www.youtube.com/c/Tutor2uNet
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqq...m8EM8CCWkCy9Pg (AQA)
https://www.youtube.com/user/HscHubVid
https://www.youtube.com/c/emilyfroud (AQA)

https://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/psychology
https://studywise.co.uk/a-level-revision
https://senecalearning.com/
https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com...logy-revision/
https://studyrocket.co.uk/revision (AQA)
https://revisionworld.com/a2-level-l...level-revision
https://www.simplypsychology.org/
https://www.sparknotes.com/psychology/

I hope this helped :jumphug:
Sorry this is so long! 😂😂
Last edited by Hellohsjakodsmka; 4 weeks ago
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Ellie098
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(Original post by Hellohsjakodsmka)
Ooo good luck with a level psych! You're going to love it!

You absolutely don't need to memorise the names of researchers but I used them as a fun way to revise e.g. would write the name on one side of a flashcard with questions and underneath i would draw a funny picture related to the name and the study. For example, for Loftus and Palmer (1974) I would draw a car crashing into a palm tree. This didn't always work so well if the researcher had a boring name but it was so fun to revise haha - remember you need to repeat them regularly

Try to link evaluation points together in your essays, especially if you're making a "generic" evaluation!! You don't need to make a conclusion, but imo an essay runs more smoothly if you're having an "argument with yourself" as opposed to writing every evaluation point you've memorised without considering their relative strengths and weaknesses.

I think that past paper practice is less important for psych than for bio/chem because the answers are less fixed. However, definitely do all of the research methods/application questions and make memory aids for these based on the past papers, using the textbook to fill the gaps.
The evaluations in the green haired girl textbook for some topics are sometimes lacking (they may have several generic issues and debates answers and few counter studies/ few methodological issues etc). Its okay ig but it helps to have an extra evaluation (choose a memorable one or one you can apply to a lot of questions) from another textbook - the cat book lol, a website like simply psychology or mark schemes (like I mentioned I do with biology)

Learn the difference between command words e.g. applications vs implications, discuss vs describe + evaluate), look at the mark schemes/examiner reports for these. You'll probably have some pre-planned essay structures, but practice using these plans for different essays (e.g. comparison essays vs evaluate essays).

This is sooo important, you need to get better at planning and writing longer essays bc they naturally sets you up for shorter essays and 2/4/6- mark questions, as you just need to trim away to get concise, relevant material. Practice essays often (timed) and get feedback on them.
And also i had to mention that when we would finish a topic I would write 16 mark essays for each one - then take them to your teacher and ask her to mark it and give you feedback. If you want more marks, listen to the feedback they give you, do it again and take it back to them. I remember my psych teacher got SO annoyed at me because I'd give her around 3 essays a week to mark so make sure you take it to both of your teachers because it's better to have feedback from more than one person haha

Resources:
https://www.youtube.com/c/ALevelRevision
https://www.youtube.com/c/Tutor2uNet
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqq...m8EM8CCWkCy9Pg (AQA)
https://www.youtube.com/user/HscHubVid
https://www.youtube.com/c/emilyfroud (AQA)

https://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/psychology
https://studywise.co.uk/a-level-revision
https://senecalearning.com/
https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com...logy-revision/
https://studyrocket.co.uk/revision (AQA)
https://revisionworld.com/a2-level-l...level-revision
https://www.simplypsychology.org/
https://www.sparknotes.com/psychology/

I hope this helped :jumphug:
Sorry this is so long! 😂😂
Thank you so much! This is very helpful.
Although its not needed, would you recommend learning the researchers names and dates just to put you ahead and stand out from other students?

Thank you for linking all the resources!
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Hellohsjakodsmka
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(Original post by Ellie098)
Thank you so much! This is very helpful.
Although its not needed, would you recommend learning the researchers names and dates just to put you ahead and stand out from other students?

Thank you for linking all the resources!
Any time!
obviously you still need to know the main researchers names, like Asch, milgram etc. but the ones you learn for evaluation you don't need to memorise at all, e.g. banuzai and mohavedi (no, you dont stand out and you don't get extra marks either, you can just say "a researcher investigated the effect of anxiety on long term memory and found that...")
Good luck! :hugs:
Feel free to ask more questions
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