Should I seek help from a GP?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I am going to start studying at University this October and I have moved in recently (earlier than home students since I count as international albeit I went to Sixth Form in the UK).

I have had issues with anxiety since Y10, which it has alternated in intensity according to the amount of stress/pressure I am under in terms of symptoms.

In addition to this, I have also noticed an increased incidence of symptoms related to what I believe is depression since Year 12, such as sense of hopelessness, difficulties in concentrating, evident loss of short term memory, sleep patterns disruption, mood swings etc. Again, I have noticed a change in intensity of such symptoms according to specific times of the year (albeit not seasonally related).

I think I also have a history of OCD episodes (never professionally assessed) in the past but they seem to have disappeared in the past 5-6 years or so.

Having said this, since I have now started to meet new students at University, I believe that such alleged conditions are holding me back socially, as I think they make me harder to interact effectively in social situations which are not academically-related.

I have considered going to a GP but I am unsure due to the following reasons:

1) I doubt the effectiveness of treatment can be given to me, which I think it would require too long to caliber effectively to my needs.

2) Albeit this is a less important concern, I would have to do this "secretly", without telling my parents or any relative, albeit they are already aware of my anxiety issues.

As a result, I am undecided what would be the best course to take (Carry on as usual? Getting professional help?).

Would anybody have any suggestions?

Many thanks in advance.
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Anonymous #2
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Omg yess do ittt. You’ll regret it if you don’t (well I did) I wish I got help sooner. Please dooo. You don’t have to be diagnosed to feel like you’ve got a disorder btw
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Joleee
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do you know the cause of your anxiety?

tbh a GP doesn’t ‘treat’ mental health beyond giving you a prescription and maybe a referral to counselling (which you can do yourself. you don’t need a GP). if you’re interested in either than go see your GP but don’t go if you’re hoping for more than that. your parents will never know if you saw the GP. it’s confidential.

you should contact your university’s well being department if you want to speak to someone quickly btw as NHS counselling may take 6 months to get in
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Anonymous #3
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www.getselfhelp.co.uk is a useful site

try magnesium citrate 400mg tabs, these sometimes can help, or a strong vitamin B complex, I use zipvit online vitamin company.

What course are you doing? you may want to try some vitamin or herbal remedies like Kalms before seeing a GP, especially if you are doing Medicine or a health-care related degree, some may argue it could work against you, my GP did, when I asked to be referred for counselling for anxiety and depression, so he gave me antideps.
Although if you need help, then you need help, and it is probably better to seek help rather than struggle.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Joleee)
do you know the cause of your anxiety?

tbh a GP doesn’t ‘treat’ mental health beyond giving you a prescription and maybe a referral to counselling (which you can do yourself. you don’t need a GP). if you’re interested in either than go see your GP but don’t go if you’re hoping for more than that. your parents will never know if you saw the GP. it’s confidential.

you should contact your university’s well being department if you want to speak to someone quickly btw as NHS counselling may take 6 months to get in
Well, I think it is mostly due to high standards I set to myself in pretty much everything I do (e.g. I revised 80-100hours a weeks between January and March for my A-Levels just to make sure not only to get 3A*s, but also to get as close as possible to the highest results nationally) but I would say that is only part of the picture.

Thanks for the advice!
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Anonymous #4
#6
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am going to start studying at University this October and I have moved in recently (earlier than home students since I count as international albeit I went to Sixth Form in the UK).

I have had issues with anxiety since Y10, which it has alternated in intensity according to the amount of stress/pressure I am under in terms of symptoms.

In addition to this, I have also noticed an increased incidence of symptoms related to what I believe is depression since Year 12, such as sense of hopelessness, difficulties in concentrating, evident loss of short term memory, sleep patterns disruption, mood swings etc. Again, I have noticed a change in intensity of such symptoms according to specific times of the year (albeit not seasonally related).

I think I also have a history of OCD episodes (never professionally assessed) in the past but they seem to have disappeared in the past 5-6 years or so.

Having said this, since I have now started to meet new students at University, I believe that such alleged conditions are holding me back socially, as I think they make me harder to interact effectively in social situations which are not academically-related.

I have considered going to a GP but I am unsure due to the following reasons:

1) I doubt the effectiveness of treatment can be given to me, which I think it would require too long to caliber effectively to my needs.

2) Albeit this is a less important concern, I would have to do this "secretly", without telling my parents or any relative, albeit they are already aware of my anxiety issues.

As a result, I am undecided what would be the best course to take (Carry on as usual? Getting professional help?).

Would anybody have any suggestions?

Many thanks in advance.
I think you need a reality check if you believe seeing a GP makes you have better "should I see a GP?"


This is a terrible mentality, just get employed and build your savings. If you go to a gp those savings will go like down because you’ll have to chuck money on counselling.

The most honest advice you need right now is 'head out of arse.' I have seen posts like this before and I've told them the exact same before too but they sometimes take no notice. Get a part time job, stop worrying about the result/outcome and focus on the process, and basically wind your neck in. A GP can’t suddenly doesn't make you happy. They’ll just suggest counselling which just makes your bank account lighter and gives you more independence - at the moment I don't think you're quite ready for that responsibility...
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Noodlzzz
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As someone who hid both symptoms and treatment of mental health from my parents too, I was wondering why you decided this?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Noodlzzz)
As someone who hid both symptoms and treatment of mental health from my parents too, I was wondering why you decided this?
I think it would only affect their view of myself negatively, I do not see any gain in terms of reputation with them by telling them about that.
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