yanon
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
I'm interested in maths ,mainly further pure and statistics, cognitive and developmental psychology, philosophy, and organic chem (dont like inorganic or physical chem). don't really like biology or physics (especially mechanic, quite like space and matter tho). I'm not an essay person and prefer learning concepts over regurgitating information. I'd like to perhaps work in a research group, maybe later on life as a teacher (preferably teaching young kids or sixth form, don't really want to teach secondary). I've looked into Natci course but most of them dont excite me except maybe ucl and cambridge. I'm not sure about ucl course since ive seen reviews saying it is not well organised and i applied to cambridge last year and got rejected post interview so i am not willing to take that chance again and potentially waste a gap year. I've seen nottingham course but the chemistry part of the course is geared at inorganic chem which i cant really stand. So yh, i've been researching for so long on universities i am interested in but no course feels suited to me. Perhaps instead of searching for course i should start doing work experience to explore my interests more and get an idea of what i like. i have a confirmed place to study chemistry at imperial but i am thinking of rejecting it since i am not too interested with about 55% of the course. Would it not be hard finding work experience during covid?
if i take a gap year wont I be bored?
need help, am i being too picky?
i think its important i pick a course that will allow me to explore my interests, i cant really motivate myself for a course i have zero interests in. I had to drop biology in year 12 since i couldnt stand it.
0
reply
claireestelle
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by yanon)
I'm interested in maths ,mainly further pure and statistics, cognitive and developmental psychology, philosophy, and organic chem (dont like inorganic or physical chem). don't really like biology or physics (especially mechanic, quite like space and matter tho). I'm not an essay person and prefer learning concepts over regurgitating information. I'd like to perhaps work in a research group, maybe later on life as a teacher (preferably teaching young kids or sixth form, don't really want to teach secondary). I've looked into Natci course but most of them dont excite me except maybe ucl and cambridge. I'm not sure about ucl course since ive seen reviews saying it is not well organised and i applied to cambridge last year and got rejected post interview so i am not willing to take that chance again and potentially waste a gap year. I've seen nottingham course but the chemistry part of the course is geared at inorganic chem which i cant really stand. So yh, i've been researching for so long on universities i am interested in but no course feels suited to me. Perhaps instead of searching for course i should start doing work experience to explore my interests more and get an idea of what i like. i have a confirmed place to study chemistry at imperial but i am thinking of rejecting it since i am not too interested with about 55% of the course. Would it not be hard finding work experience during covid?
if i take a gap year wont I be bored?
need help, am i being too picky?
i think its important i pick a course that will allow me to explore my interests, i cant really motivate myself for a course i have zero interests in. I had to drop biology in year 12 since i couldnt stand it.
how about you do a maths and psychology degree?
0
reply
Theloniouss
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
You're unlikely to find a degree that caters to all your interests, so you might just have to decide which ones you prefer.
0
reply
Ramipril
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
If you don't need to go to university right now, don't go. I get some people say it's the best place to go for a young person since covid etc. but I disagree with that because I don't think going to university should be seen as a potential avenue to go down just because there may be nothing better to do.

You can still find jobs, but you may need to work harder to find one. They are still there though. You could do online courses whilst job hunting/working and see where your interests really lie. Then in the future if university is actually for you, you may have a clearer idea of what to do plus some money and life experience under your belt too.
1
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
If you are very unsure on what you want to do, I would recommend taking a gap year and exploring your options - starting a degree then realising you want to do another is a bit of a pain because you use up one of your (finite) years of SFE funding, so it would be better to take the time to find out what you want to do first and then commit to it fully when you are ready.

Although it doesn't include any chemistry, the Edinburgh cognitive sciences course includes pretty much all the other areas in some capacity, so that might be worth exploring. If you are interested in pursuing chemistry further I would recommend looking at bit more into what is included in inorganic and physical chemistry at uni, as it might be somewhat different to what you encountered at A-level. However fundamentally you will cover at least 2 of those areas in any joint honours course typically, and all 3 in a full chemistry degree, so if you only care for organic chemistry after exploring the nature of university level chemistry more, you should perhaps discount chemistry as a degree option.

If you did find the nature of university level physical chemistry more appealing (it involves a more calculus work than in A-level to begin with) after looking into it, you might want to explore chemical physics degrees. These tend to focus on either inorganic or organic chemistry, plus physical chemistry and the areas of physic applicable usually focusing on quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics/thermal physics, atomic/molecular physic and/or nuclear/particle physics. The mechanics and EM work you would do in that course would usually be in "service" to those other areas e.g. to support later learning of QM principles. It's also worth bearing in mind university physics is somewhat different to A-level since it is all calculus based, which usually makes the dynamics stuff less tedious.

That aside, most psychology courses will include a fair amount of stats work (although it is more applied stats), and most philosophy courses will include at least some formal logic work (which is in some respects similar in style to some of the maths you'll have been doing). So a joint honours course in philosophy and psychology might allow you to undertake much of the types of work you enjoy doing, and some of the specific areas. However bear mind any philosophy course is going to be largely essay based, and psychology courses will include at least to some extent extended prose writing.

However, essays are not about "regurgitating information", at least if you want to get more than a bare minimum pass. The point of an essay is to present a thesis (argument) analytically and present the relevant information to support the points you are making. Simply writing everything you know about some particular topic (be it metaphysics or cognitive neuroscience) in an essay isn't going to score many marks compared to actually carefully answering the question posed, which will invariably be written so as to have you write such an analytical argument as described. In fact if you read examiners reports from essay based subjects at universities, almost all of them will point out that a tendency to regurgitate information uncritically led to lower marks on some (or many!) scripts.

On the maths side the major thing I would note is that degree level maths is very different to A-level Maths - it's very abstract and proof based with much less "problem solving" type maths, and what there is in that vein is still unlike A-level as the problems you are solving are much less fit to a rigid mould as in A-level so it's a bit less "pattern recognition" of matching the correct method to the problem as there may be multiple ways to approach it or it may not immediately be obvious which method(s) apply. The kinds of maths you are used to in A-level Maths tends to be more present in courses in the physical sciences and engineering, i.e. mathematical methods.

I would recommend seeing if you can get hold of some kind of introductory analysis textbook (or something similar), such as Spivak's Calculus (or really anything called introduction to analysis or a first course in analysis or something in that vein) to get an idea of how maths is done at degree level (a lot more precise, pedantic even, in framing the problem initially, then carefully developing the proof from that). There are are also many "gap bridging" type textbooks which may be of interest, which aim to connect the maths you're familiar with, with the more formal style of maths done at uni, so these might also be worth looking into. That said I wouldn't recommend spending more than say £20-30 on such a text at most; some textbooks are very expensive and you can usually find it available cheaper than the £70 textbooks you'll find in university libraries (although if you have access to a library with such books, take advantage of it!).

Teaching is a whole other kettle of fish...depending on the level you wish to teach (primary vs secondary) the particular route(s) that are "best" for going into that may vary. For secondary you generally want to study a subject with at least 50% of the content being what your proposed teaching subject would be (as that tis a common requirement for PGCEs). For primary teaching a QTS degree might be the best option, which will usually be a BA in Education with QTS or similar. Work experience in a teaching environment (normally a school) would be ideal for this (and probably necessary at some point for most routes).


04MR17 is probably best placed to advise for education studies/teaching related matters. Noodlzzz might be able to provide some info on psychology at uni, and CheeseIsVeg might be able to advise on chemistry at degree level also!
1
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by yanon)
I'm interested in maths ,mainly further pure and statistics, cognitive and developmental psychology, philosophy, and organic chem (dont like inorganic or physical chem). don't really like biology or physics (especially mechanic, quite like space and matter tho). I'm not an essay person and prefer learning concepts over regurgitating information. I'd like to perhaps work in a research group, maybe later on life as a teacher (preferably teaching young kids or sixth form, don't really want to teach secondary). I've looked into Natci course but most of them dont excite me except maybe ucl and cambridge. I'm not sure about ucl course since ive seen reviews saying it is not well organised and i applied to cambridge last year and got rejected post interview so i am not willing to take that chance again and potentially waste a gap year. I've seen nottingham course but the chemistry part of the course is geared at inorganic chem which i cant really stand. So yh, i've been researching for so long on universities i am interested in but no course feels suited to me. Perhaps instead of searching for course i should start doing work experience to explore my interests more and get an idea of what i like. i have a confirmed place to study chemistry at imperial but i am thinking of rejecting it since i am not too interested with about 55% of the course. Would it not be hard finding work experience during covid?
if i take a gap year wont I be bored?
need help, am i being too picky?
i think its important i pick a course that will allow me to explore my interests, i cant really motivate myself for a course i have zero interests in. I had to drop biology in year 12 since i couldnt stand it.
Have you looked at Exeter's flexible combined honours degree: https://www.exeter.ac.uk/fch/
1
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
Not much to add from me. I certainly think a more flexible course may be the way to go for you if you do wish to go to university. Note though that there are other options outside of Higher Education that you may wish to consider - and taking a gap year has some advantages in allowing you time to think about your options. It can often seem as though the natural step for students who are "academically able" in the traditional sense of the term to progress onto a university course after they've finished their school studies - but in reality that's not always the case and very bright students can benefit from alternative vocational courses. University is a big commitment if you are not sure what you are going to get out of it.

My best advice would be to really think hard about potential career areas you could see yourself in and work backwards from there. I heard mention of an Education Studies type course - it may be helpful for you to know that these courses are often very essay-heavy. All degree courses will involve a large about of written work, but the form that takes will vary. With BA Education, you're going to have a lot of theoretical assignments, a lot of essays with debates, and some opportunities for empirical research - the same is true for most other social sciences. Philosophy will find you writing essays and the topics will be even less research-focused (by which I mean there's a lot less about research methodology involved) - whereas psychology will take you the other way: there will be far more opportunities to conduct your own "research" and the work you submit where you talk about other people's findings will focus a lot on their methodology rather than having an actual debate.

On Chemistry, if you only like Organic then a Chem degree is not for you. You will very likely have to do some Inorganic and Physical chemistry throughout the first two years, and potentially in the 3rd year as well.
2
reply
yanon
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by claireestelle)
how about you do a maths and psychology degree?
But then I feel like I'd be missing out on the chemistry aspect. I used to want to work in healthcare and somehow still hold up that aspiration. I feel like chemistry would be easier to transition to healthcare than maths. And would be more useful in helping me decide whether working healthcare is for me
0
reply
CheeseIsVeg
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by artful_lounger)
x
:ta:
(Original post by yanon)
x
Hi I am in my final year of Chemistry so feel free to ask me about anything chemistry
I also had an offer at Imperial when I was applying.
I admit I did not take it as I did not enjoy my open day visit. They are a traditional course I believe, you will do phys/inorg/org chem most likely for at least 3 years with a few options.

I would check out things that incorporate chemistry but are not fully chemistry otherwise you may not enjoy it :yy:
I know this from experience, after my first year a few of my friends dropped out for biochemistry/engineering and even physics !

Have you had a look at something such as medicinal chemistry or biochemistry? Those are very organic-heavy and from what I've heard from friends (at least at Southampton) your first year you will cover essential (simpler) topics in inorganic/physical and all other modules will be biology or organic chemistry based.
You are talking DNA, mechanisms, medicinal chemistry, natural product chemistry and stuff like neurology
You'll definitely do statistics but not much else in terms of maths however :beard:

Have you considered anything engineering? Chemical engineering might interest you or something a bit more applied. Chemical physics is more on the physics side and engineering will come with lots of maths.

I'm not sure how helpful the above is but don't give up, keep looking and make sure to take advantage of any online open day events unis will be doing in october time!

Feel free to quote me if you want to chat Chemistry!
Cheese
1
reply
yanon
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by CheeseIsVeg)
:ta:


Hi I am in my final year of Chemistry so feel free to ask me about anything chemistry
I also had an offer at Imperial when I was applying.
I admit I did not take it as I did not enjoy my open day visit. They are a traditional course I believe, you will do phys/inorg/org chem most likely for at least 3 years with a few options.

I would check out things that incorporate chemistry but are not fully chemistry otherwise you may not enjoy it :yy:
I know this from experience, after my first year a few of my friends dropped out for biochemistry/engineering and even physics !

Have you had a look at something such as medicinal chemistry or biochemistry? Those are very organic-heavy and from what I've heard from friends (at least at Southampton) your first year you will cover essential (simpler) topics in inorganic/physical and all other modules will be biology or organic chemistry based.
You are talking DNA, mechanisms, medicinal chemistry, natural product chemistry and stuff like neurology
You'll definitely do statistics but not much else in terms of maths however :beard:

Have you considered anything engineering? Chemical engineering might interest you or something a bit more applied. Chemical physics is more on the physics side and engineering will come with lots of maths.

I'm not sure how helpful the above is but don't give up, keep looking and make sure to take advantage of any online open day events unis will be doing in october time!

Feel free to quote me if you want to chat Chemistry!
Cheese
Hi, would love to chat !

How different is A Level Chemistry from degree Level Chemistry?
Also how much maths is involved in chemistry ?
also what type of maths is involved, e.g. more pure or statistics or mechanics ?
also is their a lot of memory involved in chemistry or is more conceptual ?
How is the workload like, are you able to find some free time to do other stuff besides chemistry?
any thing else i should know about doing a chemistry degree, particularly about the first year ?

also do you have to be extremely passionate about chemistry to pursue it on it own as a degree, i am not sure if i'd be able to go through 3 years of chemistry with the same passion/interest :/
i feel like the reason i was interested in chemistry was because of the way my teachers were teaching it.

thank you so much for your help !
0
reply
yanon
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by artful_lounger)
If you are very unsure on what you want to do, I would recommend taking a gap year and exploring your options - starting a degree then realising you want to do another is a bit of a pain because you use up one of your (finite) years of SFE funding, so it would be better to take the time to find out what you want to do first and then commit to it fully when you are ready.

Although it doesn't include any chemistry, the Edinburgh cognitive sciences course includes pretty much all the other areas in some capacity, so that might be worth exploring. If you are interested in pursuing chemistry further I would recommend looking at bit more into what is included in inorganic and physical chemistry at uni, as it might be somewhat different to what you encountered at A-level. However fundamentally you will cover at least 2 of those areas in any joint honours course typically, and all 3 in a full chemistry degree, so if you only care for organic chemistry after exploring the nature of university level chemistry more, you should perhaps discount chemistry as a degree option.

If you did find the nature of university level physical chemistry more appealing (it involves a more calculus work than in A-level to begin with) after looking into it, you might want to explore chemical physics degrees. These tend to focus on either inorganic or organic chemistry, plus physical chemistry and the areas of physic applicable usually focusing on quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics/thermal physics, atomic/molecular physic and/or nuclear/particle physics. The mechanics and EM work you would do in that course would usually be in "service" to those other areas e.g. to support later learning of QM principles. It's also worth bearing in mind university physics is somewhat different to A-level since it is all calculus based, which usually makes the dynamics stuff less tedious.

That aside, most psychology courses will include a fair amount of stats work (although it is more applied stats), and most philosophy courses will include at least some formal logic work (which is in some respects similar in style to some of the maths you'll have been doing). So a joint honours course in philosophy and psychology might allow you to undertake much of the types of work you enjoy doing, and some of the specific areas. However bear mind any philosophy course is going to be largely essay based, and psychology courses will include at least to some extent extended prose writing.

However, essays are not about "regurgitating information", at least if you want to get more than a bare minimum pass. The point of an essay is to present a thesis (argument) analytically and present the relevant information to support the points you are making. Simply writing everything you know about some particular topic (be it metaphysics or cognitive neuroscience) in an essay isn't going to score many marks compared to actually carefully answering the question posed, which will invariably be written so as to have you write such an analytical argument as described. In fact if you read examiners reports from essay based subjects at universities, almost all of them will point out that a tendency to regurgitate information uncritically led to lower marks on some (or many!) scripts.

On the maths side the major thing I would note is that degree level maths is very different to A-level Maths - it's very abstract and proof based with much less "problem solving" type maths, and what there is in that vein is still unlike A-level as the problems you are solving are much less fit to a rigid mould as in A-level so it's a bit less "pattern recognition" of matching the correct method to the problem as there may be multiple ways to approach it or it may not immediately be obvious which method(s) apply. The kinds of maths you are used to in A-level Maths tends to be more present in courses in the physical sciences and engineering, i.e. mathematical methods.

I would recommend seeing if you can get hold of some kind of introductory analysis textbook (or something similar), such as Spivak's Calculus (or really anything called introduction to analysis or a first course in analysis or something in that vein) to get an idea of how maths is done at degree level (a lot more precise, pedantic even, in framing the problem initially, then carefully developing the proof from that). There are are also many "gap bridging" type textbooks which may be of interest, which aim to connect the maths you're familiar with, with the more formal style of maths done at uni, so these might also be worth looking into. That said I wouldn't recommend spending more than say £20-30 on such a text at most; some textbooks are very expensive and you can usually find it available cheaper than the £70 textbooks you'll find in university libraries (although if you have access to a library with such books, take advantage of it!).

Teaching is a whole other kettle of fish...depending on the level you wish to teach (primary vs secondary) the particular route(s) that are "best" for going into that may vary. For secondary you generally want to study a subject with at least 50% of the content being what your proposed teaching subject would be (as that tis a common requirement for PGCEs). For primary teaching a QTS degree might be the best option, which will usually be a BA in Education with QTS or similar. Work experience in a teaching environment (normally a school) would be ideal for this (and probably necessary at some point for most routes).


04MR17 is probably best placed to advise for education studies/teaching related matters. Noodlzzz might be able to provide some info on psychology at uni, and CheeseIsVeg might be able to advise on chemistry at degree level also!
Thank you for helping !. I'll definitely look into the cognitive science degree, and yeah the lack of chemistry does seem a bit worrying for me. but nonetheless i will look into it. The idea of looking at textbooks is a good one. I have been looking at A Level text books particularly when looking into my interests of philosophy and psychology as well as listening to podcast. I feel like looking at those textbooks would benefit me a lot. with regards to regurgitation, I didn't mean it with regard to essay writing but rather subjects like biology. For example it is packed with information that is very simple to understand and no complicated understanding of the material is required. all that is required of you is to remember the loads of information. at least this is what i found in as biology. I also know the first two years of medicine are quite similar in that vein. it would requires you to just remember a bunch of information in quite a short period of time. My brain doesn't work like that. for example, i preferred maths over biology in a level as it was less memory but more 'pattern spotting' and very concept based. A understanding of the methods was required therefore i found it very fulfilling being able to finally solve difficult maths problems. Chemistry at A Level was also like this which i why i enjoyed it.
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by yanon)
Thank you for helping !. I'll definitely look into the cognitive science degree, and yeah the lack of chemistry does seem a bit worrying for me. but nonetheless i will look into it. The idea of looking at textbooks is a good one. I have been looking at A Level text books particularly when looking into my interests of philosophy and psychology as well as listening to podcast. I feel like looking at those textbooks would benefit me a lot. with regards to regurgitation, I didn't mean it with regard to essay writing but rather subjects like biology. For example it is packed with information that is very simple to understand and no complicated understanding of the material is required. all that is required of you is to remember the loads of information. at least this is what i found in as biology. I also know the first two years of medicine are quite similar in that vein. it would requires you to just remember a bunch of information in quite a short period of time. My brain doesn't work like that. for example, i preferred maths over biology in a level as it was less memory but more 'pattern spotting' and very concept based. A understanding of the methods was required therefore i found it very fulfilling being able to finally solve difficult maths problems. Chemistry at A Level was also like this which i why i enjoyed it.
Honestly at degree level I think you will find even biology not like that; I think medicine is really an exception to the rule, more due to the nature of the course.

In terms of the textbooks, I was referring specifically to maths though, because the maths done in a maths degree is totally unlike the maths done in A-level, so it's well worth being aware of this difference before going into it (speaking from experience!).
0
reply
CheeseIsVeg
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by yanon)
Hi, would love to chat !

How different is A Level Chemistry from degree Level Chemistry?
Also how much maths is involved in chemistry ?
also what type of maths is involved, e.g. more pure or statistics or mechanics ?
also is their a lot of memory involved in chemistry or is more conceptual ?
How is the workload like, are you able to find some free time to do other stuff besides chemistry?
any thing else i should know about doing a chemistry degree, particularly about the first year ?

also do you have to be extremely passionate about chemistry to pursue it on it own as a degree, i am not sure if i'd be able to go through 3 years of chemistry with the same passion/interest :/
i feel like the reason i was interested in chemistry was because of the way my teachers were teaching it.

thank you so much for your help !
Hey there

Er good question! I would say at A Level it is not always clear whether you are studying inorganic/physical chemistry.
This will become very clear and defined, sure some topics overlap and you might do them in a different light but you will have probably 2 lectures a week at Uni of Physical, then inorganic and then organic.
At A level you briefly touch each subject and topic but at degree level throughout each year you will go into the specific theories and how they apply in real life scenarios. E.G: in organic chemistry you don't just learn a mechanism, you understand why each step is how you see it. Why is the arrow in this direction? Why is this complex formed? You will really understand why whereas at A level it's more learn this mechanism or what this complex is, at degree level it's why and this is how you name complexes!

Honestly the maths in chemistry, especially first year, is extremely basic. You are talking rearranging equations, the odd differentiation or integration and it's only from year 2 onwards it gets challenging. Differential equations, a bit of physics (mechanics) but I really mean a pinch of it! and then things such as complex numbers, operators and imaginary notation. This hits hard when you cover Quantum Mechanics (lots of matrices).

This is subjective. A lot of students sort of quickly grasp and understand some topics. A lot of chemistry is very diagrammatic and visual as well such as symmetry and group theory which you will do in year 1/2. Some of that you learn, for sure, but the rest is all application to often an example you've never seen or heard of before.
In my personal opinion, organic is always a memory task unless you live and breathe it The other 2 are very much application and here is a theory, now what about this random example?
If you take any optional modules in chemistry they are likely to be less on the memory side too. Very much theoretical, analytical and problem solving!

I had a very chill first year and I would highly recommend that. After then you probably have time for 2-3 societies max. I always had time for at least 1 day at the weekend of absolutely no work but I got into a strict and effective routine of always following up with lectures on the same day of attending.
Again it's about you and what you like to do/how you work!

My advice is always take it chill and slow in the first year. Enjoy your first year, make some friends, go to events and don't push yourself too hard! Ensure you choose a chemistry course that enables you to take optional modules in areas of chemistry that interest you (that's how I chose my course). I actually took some really interesting modules such as sustainable chemistry and atmospheric chemistry and would highly recommend it :yy:

I would definitely say do not choose the chemistry course for any other reason than your own interest or enjoyment. It will be hard to keep going and enjoy the course if you were doing it say because your parents/friends want you to or something such as that. Do it because you are genuinely intrigued and want to study the subject.

I chose chemistry because it was my favourite science at school and I always enjoyed the practical work. I too have a strong hatred for biology and so I hated the organic chemistry side but it was still manageable. Going into my final year I still enjoy it and am looking forward to doing my research project in electrochemistry :woohoo:

Hope this helps + again I do not mind being quoted if you have further questions!
Cheese
2
reply
University of Bath
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by yanon)
I'm interested in maths ,mainly further pure and statistics, cognitive and developmental psychology, philosophy, and organic chem (dont like inorganic or physical chem). don't really like biology or physics (especially mechanic, quite like space and matter tho). I'm not an essay person and prefer learning concepts over regurgitating information. I'd like to perhaps work in a research group, maybe later on life as a teacher (preferably teaching young kids or sixth form, don't really want to teach secondary). I've looked into Natci course but most of them dont excite me except maybe ucl and cambridge. I'm not sure about ucl course since ive seen reviews saying it is not well organised and i applied to cambridge last year and got rejected post interview so i am not willing to take that chance again and potentially waste a gap year. I've seen nottingham course but the chemistry part of the course is geared at inorganic chem which i cant really stand. So yh, i've been researching for so long on universities i am interested in but no course feels suited to me. Perhaps instead of searching for course i should start doing work experience to explore my interests more and get an idea of what i like. i have a confirmed place to study chemistry at imperial but i am thinking of rejecting it since i am not too interested with about 55% of the course. Would it not be hard finding work experience during covid?
if i take a gap year wont I be bored?
need help, am i being too picky?
i think its important i pick a course that will allow me to explore my interests, i cant really motivate myself for a course i have zero interests in. I had to drop biology in year 12 since i couldnt stand it.
Hi there,

Based on what you've said, your interests are:
  • Maths (pure and statistics)
  • Cognitive and developmental psychology
  • Philosophy
  • Organic Chemistry
And you don't want:
  • Inorganic or physical chemistry
  • Physic
  • Biology

In my opinion, you'll be incredibly hard-pressed to find a degree that will accommodate your interests. The degree that springs to mind that will suit you the most is Maths with Philosophy, which is offered at a few universities including Oxford and Bristol. It is quite a niche degree, so not offered at very many universities and most of the good ones have higher grade requirements, so this is worth keeping in mind. From what I recall when applying, the Cambridge NatSci course doesn't give you a huge range of choice when it comes to the modules, so I don't envision this suiting your interests completely. Within UCL's NatSci course, some stream combos that would suit you are:
  • (Maths & Stats) + Neuroscience and Psychology
  • Organic Chemistry + Neuroscience and Psychology
  • Organic Chemistry + History and Philosophy of Science
  • Neuroscience and Psychology + History and Philosophy of Science

However, it's worth remembering that since you don't have biology A-Level, it may be harder for you to get onto streams or degrees for psychology as many of them require this at A-Level.

Other than those streams in the UCL course, and the Maths w/ Philosophy courses, I cannot think of any other courses that would meet your interests.

It may be worth trying to think about what careers you'd want to pursue, and consequently what degrees will get you there. Your interests are very specific, i.e. you don't like chemistry as a whole, you just like organic chemistry, BUT you don't like biology, so this rules out a lot of courses. Once you have a clearer idea of what your interests are, it will be easier to choose a course. It's also worth remembering that your degree will never cover every little thing you're interested in, which is why universities have societies. For example, if you did a degree in Maths and Philosophy, you could still join a Psychology society.

I hope this has helped, and please let me know if you have any more questions
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (57)
15.49%
I'm not sure (11)
2.99%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (127)
34.51%
I have already dropped out (6)
1.63%
I'm not a current university student (167)
45.38%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed