I want to quit my apprenticeship after 2 years

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Apprenticewtf
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I’m 23, been in work for 5 years. I’ve been doing my healthcare apprenticeship level 3 for 2 years now. I’m due to finish in January and I am very behind in coursework.

I don’t mind the job, but I HATE the college side of things. There is not, and never has been, any help, guidance or teaching from the college. It is boring, mundane and often irrelevant. I used to be the academic sort but I cannot even open my mind to do this coursework. Because of this, alongside depression (worsened by this course) and covid stress, I am very behind.

Turns out that this course is also not accepted by any ****ing universities anyway, and I no longer want to do nursing, so it seems pointless to even finish it. I do the exact same job as those who aren’t apprentices, for two thirds the pay, so can I just leave out that this was an apprenticeship from future CV’s?

I’m 2 years in, finish in 3 months and my coursework is at 60%. I can keep my job at the hospital on a bank contract and make way better money. The grass seems so much greener to quit. I’m looking for perspectives on what I should do here.

Many thanks.
Last edited by Apprenticewtf; 4 weeks ago
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Mjed1405
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Just stay and put in a few months of work and it'll be worth it. It'll look so much better to future employers that you completed this. Seeing as everything is a bit crap cos of covid-19 means it's the perfect time to get on with stuff like this. Put in the hard work now so future you can reap the benefits.

Also, is there really that much to do? Surely if you do an evening/weekend day a week of solid coursework then you'll easily get it done? January is still quite far away. For my Lvl 3 Accounting apprenticeship I did most of my coursework equivalent work (It was a large portfolio of evidence) in the last month and it was fine! Just manage your time properly and be disciplined. I got into one of the biggest firms in the world because I got that qualification.
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iNeed2p
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(Original post by Apprenticewtf)
Turns out that this course is also not accepted by any ****ing universities anyway, and I no longer want to do nursing, so it seems pointless to even finish it.
I wouldn't give up after almost done it but, before i get into that, what is the course and the qualification name after you finish it?
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Chris2892
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I’ve done a level 2, 3, 4-5, and 6.
The academic side always feels like a waste of time and i hated it for the whole 8 years I spent studying, including at university.
Here are some of my reasons why I though academic study wasn’t useful:.
• Projects/modules had low relevance to the workplace.
• Skills taught weren’t transferable to the workplace
• interpersonal and project management skills were either not taught, discussed, or were poorly taught.
• Study was always introductory level
• Student versions of software was always limited
• Academic facilities were less that what I had at the workplace
• Tutors were less knowledgable and helpful than my work colleagues in the areas that mattered to me
• Assessments were fool proof and measure of ability was done in a way deemed too subjective.

This in mind, it’s half the contribution to you achieving your competence qualification that the apprenticeship gives you. This is the most valuable part of your apprenticeship.

Don’t let your dislike for academics deter you from achieving your proof of competence.
I would advise you to rethink uni, level 3 was significantly easier compared level 4 onwards. The workload and stress broke me to tears at times and I’m quite resilient.
Last edited by Chris2892; 4 weeks ago
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Ki Yung Na
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Do it till the end. January is not far away at all.

If you leave now it’ll look to (some or many) employers like you were too weak to finish (got depressed and didn’t fight it, or depression or not, you simply couldn’t hack the qualification and gave up).

The second point in the bracket is exactly what it is. Yes you may have depression but you are giving up on something because you don’t want to or feel you can’t do it.

As someone who’s left university courses (twice), it is very evident to employers that I gave up when I could have gone on. I am good at hiding I had mental health difficulties and do inform them of the circumstances but there is always someone else who isn’t mental health difficulty prone at the time of interview (this makes employers pick who’s less risky) and if there isn’t someone who hasn’t had difficulties, there is always someone who has (overcome) difficulties and is successful.

Honestly man. Keep at the course.

You have no idea where it’ll be accepted, trust me, new options pop up everyday! And a qualification does not hurt your chances whereas failed qualifications or incomplete ones - they do. Employers are harsh, even if they claim otherwise because at the selection stage - they have to be; they have many many applicants who have the potential to do their roles. The market is very competitive. This is very true.
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