fenton484
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Title is a bit vague - I get the essay writing stuff where you're comparing two texts or looking for linguistic features, or looking at gender, ethnicity social class etc. I struggle with child language aquisiton and the stuff like learning about the history of english and all the changes. I just don't understand it. There's so much stuff to remember I keep forgetting. I revise loads so that's not the problem and its not just looking at a book, I have everything on quizlet and sometimes I just try and randomly write what I know down. If I could I'd drop it but i'm only doing 3 a levels and thats why im so worried as if i fail it I won't get into uni. any advice? thanks
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Always_Confused
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For children's acquisition, I found the two key theorists you want to look at are Skinner (positive vs negative reinforcement) and have a look at all of Brown's work. He did a lot about what grammer children should have at certain ages. When I did A-level English, I could write so much just about Brown. Vygotsky and cognitive development is also helpful. You can usually make something up about kids not yet having good object permanence and this relates to Vygotsky's cognitive development theories etc...
Master those theorists and you can answer most acquisition questions. I got an A and only used those theorists for acquisition.
If you can write about gender, good! Lots of that ties into acquisition and language change.
I found for any language change questions, look for idioms, archaic words, weird use of punctuation etc. It's easier said than done, but getting good at highlighting these things in texts helps.
It may seem like a lot to learn, but you can whittle things down, cut out a few theorists here and there and make things a bit more manageable. Look up 'spaced repetition' for revision activities. Really useful way to remember things.
Goodluck!
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Tolgash
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(Original post by Always_Confused)
For children's acquisition, I found the two key theorists you want to look at are Skinner (positive vs negative reinforcement) and have a look at all of Brown's work. He did a lot about what grammer children should have at certain ages. When I did A-level English, I could write so much just about Brown. Vygotsky and cognitive development is also helpful. You can usually make something up about kids not yet having good object permanence and this relates to Vygotsky's cognitive development theories etc...
Master those theorists and you can answer most acquisition questions. I got an A and only used those theorists for acquisition.
If you can write about gender, good! Lots of that ties into acquisition and language change.
I found for any language change questions, look for idioms, archaic words, weird use of punctuation etc. It's easier said than done, but getting good at highlighting these things in texts helps.
It may seem like a lot to learn, but you can whittle things down, cut out a few theorists here and there and make things a bit more manageable. Look up 'spaced repetition' for revision activities. Really useful way to remember things.
Goodluck!
I second this advice! What was your grade in the end?

- TE
Last edited by Tolgash; 3 months ago
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fenton484
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I

(Original post by Always_Confused)
For children's acquisition, I found the two key theorists you want to look at are Skinner (positive vs negative reinforcement) and have a look at all of Brown's work. He did a lot about what grammer children should have at certain ages. When I did A-level English, I could write so much just about Brown. Vygotsky and cognitive development is also helpful. You can usually make something up about kids not yet having good object permanence and this relates to Vygotsky's cognitive development theories etc...
Master those theorists and you can answer most acquisition questions. I got an A and only used those theorists for acquisition.
If you can write about gender, good! Lots of that ties into acquisition and language change.
I found for any language change questions, look for idioms, archaic words, weird use of punctuation etc. It's easier said than done, but getting good at highlighting these things in texts helps.
It may seem like a lot to learn, but you can whittle things down, cut out a few theorists here and there and make things a bit more manageable. Look up 'spaced repetition' for revision activities. Really useful way to remember things.
Goodluck!
I've only just started so I don't know what you're talking about lol
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Always_Confused
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(Original post by fenton484)
I


I've only just started so I don't know what you're talking about lol
To discuss children's acquisition of language, you have to link children's dialogue to preexisting theories. Some of these theorists you will find useful are Skinner, Brown and Vygotsky. You will learn about them in class later in the year then, so you can look them up now to get a chance to get ahead.
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