naomiSo
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hi! I just wanted to ask some questions to past/current/future GPs as I keep changing my mind on what I wanna do in the future, so I thought maybe some experience might help me decide. Im in year 12 rn so I have a bit of time before I decide, so I thought id do a bit of research
- why did you choose medicine and not something else like nursing or dentistry?
- how long did it take you to become a fully fledged GP assuming you are already one?
- is the job competition hard?
- does being a GP feel like a stressful and boring job or is it relatively interesting?

thanks for reading and maybe answering! any advice on choosing what to do after alevels will also be appreciated
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Democracy
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(Original post by naomiSo)
hi! I just wanted to ask some questions to past/current/future GPs as I keep changing my mind on what I wanna do in the future, so I thought maybe some experience might help me decide. Im in year 12 rn so I have a bit of time before I decide, so I thought id do a bit of research
- why did you choose medicine and not something else like nursing or dentistry?
- how long did it take you to become a fully fledged GP assuming you are already one?
- is the job competition hard?
- does being a GP feel like a stressful and boring job or is it relatively interesting?

thanks for reading and maybe answering! any advice on choosing what to do after alevels will also be appreciated
1) This is a very common question. Why don't you tell us what your ideas are first?

2) GP training takes three years after FY2. Some people take longer if they train less than full time.

3) GP is not a competitive specialty however if you wish to obtain a post in a competitive region or have a higher chance of getting the jobs you want, you need a good selection score when you apply for training.

Many GPs have portfolio careers nowadays (i.e. doing multiple things alongside working in a practice) so if you want to have these avenues open to you, you will need to work on your CV to gain relevant experience and qualifications.

If that's not important to you then it isn't particularly difficult to obtain a salaried post or locum jobs. It's a flexible career.

4) I think it's very interesting. It's very broad and general which means there's always new things to learn or re-learn. You learn skills which are practical and directly useful to patients and you can make a significant positive difference to people's lives. There is a lot of thinking outside the box, which is true for all specialties, but often in GP you're acting independently without a big team or lots of tests to rely on which feels a bit different to much of hospital medicine.

Downsides: ever increasing demands from public and politicians, never enough hours in the day to get things done, stupid paperwork, and media hostility. 12 hour days are common which is why comparatively few GPs now work every day in surgery. These problems are not unique to GP btw.

There's no need to worry about picking a specialty while you're still in year 12. For now I would just focus on whether medicine-in-general interests you.

(GP reg - in training but enjoy what I do!)
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nexttime
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(Original post by naomiSo)
hi! I just wanted to ask some questions to past/current/future GPs as I keep changing my mind on what I wanna do in the future, so I thought maybe some experience might help me decide. Im in year 12 rn so I have a bit of time before I decide, so I thought id do a bit of research
- why did you choose medicine and not something else like nursing or dentistry?
- how long did it take you to become a fully fledged GP assuming you are already one?
- is the job competition hard?
- does being a GP feel like a stressful and boring job or is it relatively interesting?

thanks for reading and maybe answering! any advice on choosing what to do after alevels will also be appreciated
I didn't choose GP but my answers would be:

1) That should be a personal answer for you to consider. You don't get very many high academic achievers in nursing.
2) You can google this. It takes med school + 2 Foundation Years + 3 GP training years, if working full time throughout with no breaks or career direction changes at all (increasingly rare).
3) No, unless in a competitive area.
4) Depends on what you consider interesting! I think most people would consider say an A&E job to be less 'boring', but also most people would consider that not a good thing in that context! Personally I'd consider it way more interesting than most jobs in existence though.

Well if you want to be a GP you should do medicine after your A-levels! Its a huge decision though, do your research, talk to people, get work experience, take extra time if you need to.
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naomiSo
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(Original post by Democracy)
1) This is a very common question. Why don't you tell us what your ideas are first?

2) GP training takes three years after FY2. Some people take longer if they train less than full time.

3) GP is not a competitive specialty however if you wish to obtain a post in a competitive region or have a higher chance of getting the jobs you want, you need a good selection score when you apply for training.

Many GPs have portfolio careers nowadays (i.e. doing multiple things alongside working in a practice) so if you want to have these avenues open to you, you will need to work on your CV to gain relevant experience and qualifications.

If that's not important to you then it isn't particularly difficult to obtain a salaried post or locum jobs. It's a flexible career.

4) I think it's very interesting. It's very broad and general which means there's always new things to learn or re-learn. You learn skills which are practical and directly useful to patients and you can make a significant positive difference to people's lives. There is a lot of thinking outside the box, which is true for all specialties, but often in GP you're acting independently without a big team or lots of tests to rely on which feels a bit different to much of hospital medicine.

Downsides: ever increasing demands from public and politicians, never enough hours in the day to get things done, stupid paperwork, and media hostility. 12 hour days are common which is why comparatively few GPs now work every day in surgery. These problems are not unique to GP btw.

There's no need to worry about picking a specialty while you're still in year 12. For now I would just focus on whether medicine-in-general interests you.

(GP reg - in training but enjoy what I do!)
Thank you so much for replying! this has been really useful and I really appreciate it

sorry if the first question was a bit blunt haha, but Ive just been going back and forth between what degree I want to do after a levels and doing medicine to specifically become a GP has always been on my mind, but so has a couple other degrees such as psychology or dentistry so I just wanted to see if I could relate to anyone elses experiences.
again, thanks so much for replying!
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naomiSo
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(Original post by nexttime)
I didn't choose GP but my answers would be:

1) That should be a personal answer for you to consider. You don't get very many high academic achievers in nursing.
2) You can google this. It takes med school + 2 Foundation Years + 3 GP training years, if working full time throughout with no breaks or career direction changes at all (increasingly rare).
3) No, unless in a competitive area.
4) Depends on what you consider interesting! I think most people would consider say an A&E job to be less 'boring', but also most people would consider that not a good thing in that context! Personally I'd consider it way more interesting than most jobs in existence though.

Well if you want to be a GP you should do medicine after your A-levels! Its a huge decision though, do your research, talk to people, get work experience, take extra time if you need to.
thank you for replying! right now I'm just trying to get as many experiences that people have had choosing different degrees and pathways to try and help me decide how I should approach uni. I really appreciate your advice, thanks!
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Democracy
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(Original post by naomiSo)
Thank you so much for replying! this has been really useful and I really appreciate it

sorry if the first question was a bit blunt haha, but Ive just been going back and forth between what degree I want to do after a levels and doing medicine to specifically become a GP has always been on my mind, but so has a couple other degrees such as psychology or dentistry so I just wanted to see if I could relate to anyone elses experiences.
again, thanks so much for replying!
You're welcome. There's no problem at all with the question so you don't need to apologise. It's just more helpful if you run your thinking past us and we can tell you where you're right and where you're not, so that way you can produce a better answer rather than just basing it off other people's experiences.
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