Have your say: could all university teaching go online?

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tam13
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Doublletrouble
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Yes.

All if not most lecturers read of power point slides, if we do it online it will be the same thing, but just at the comfort of our own home.

How many lecturers actually know the students they are teaching? most students come and just sit there for an hour or two. Same thing goes for online teaching over 100 smalls screens starring at their lecturer in silence.

And students can still access the same academic support services, is not like these are going to be taken away. Obviously many argue is not worth the 9k we are paying, but realistically sitting in a lecture listening to words being read-off the board is also not worth 9k.

If large organisations can do their meetings online, then students can learn online - this is our future unfortunately.
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dj_ad_1
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I dont think they can go all online. This is because the students would just take the year out as they want a somewhat-full university experience and apply next year meaning the university would loose funds. Therefore, they would need a lot more funding from the government and I dont think the government would give enough funds as they are still recovering from the previous lockdown. What they can do is though is receive a little funding to open a test and trace facility at the campus (a few unis are starting to open one) and anyone entering the campus (visitors, students, staff) should all get a test done and wear masks at all times (which is what most unis are currently doing).
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Ramipril
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I mean let's face it, they are going to eventually.
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historynerd47
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Most likely but depends on the degree. In my subject (history) I will only have one hour a week in person as it stands, so I'm quite sure they will make it fully online very soon- not sure on subjects that require practicals such as science, music and performing arts, but they may have to make it work
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CharlieBrownSays
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Won’t happen permanently, they will have to reduce fees and unis can’t afford that
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Ramipril
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(Original post by CharlieBrownSays)
Won’t happen permanently, they will have to reduce fees and unis can’t afford that
Permanently, no. This academic year? Maybe. Universities can do that unfortunately.
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04MR17
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Depends on the course. Some subjects lend themselves to the medium of video calling more than others.
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IanDangerously
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This has now happened at both unis in Manchester I believe due to the majority of students being quarantined in their apartments.
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fallen_acorns
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could they? yes...

Should they? No.

Yes for the bulk of students studying essay/humanities type courses its pretty easy to switch to online learning, and they really won't loose out too much at all from it.

But for any students who need specialist equipment or facilities, its not a good idea, and they would be better deferring the entire year rather than trying to force students online. think about engineering/design students who can't access the machinary to produce things.. music students who can't get to the studios or play together.. science students who cant get to the lab.. film students who can't get to the film gear or organize a shoot.. etc. For courses like that, it would be better to defer it all rather than waste 1/3 of the students courses on severly substandard education.

The only exception may be for first years. In my experiance even in practical courses, first years tend to require the specialist equipment less at first. They aren't doing big projects yet, and they have a lot of learning to do initially first.. so maybe first years could keep going. But if your a 3rd year student who should be doing a massive big practical project, and now its online? Nah... defer. wait until you can actually get your moneys worth.
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firestarter-
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As pointed out above, for students at some universities it already is. I don't see how anyone can possibly justify £9250 fees for online courses when the most experienced provider of online courses, the OU, charges a fraction of that.

Students should return home before they find themselves stranded in quarantine, refuse to pay a penny to the institutions that put them in this position and enrol with the OU this spring. If the full University experience is important to them they can transfer their credit once this fiasco is over.
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SomeWelshGuy123
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My entire Uni course was basically online anyway, 1st year - one semester of strikes, 2nd year - one semester of strieks, 3rd year 1/2 semester of strikes followed by covid. Genuinely dont recall having any contact hours in 3rd year.
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adam271
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I dont mind if they do. Maybe they should.
But they need to deal with the issue of accommodation.

How is it right that they dont let students move back home and force them to stay on campus due to rental agreements with accommodation? If I move back home I still have to pay for accommodation that I am not using.

Universities wont do it because they need the money and that's more important to them then what is right.


So assuming universities are not going to let people exit their tenancy agreements then they should absolutely continue to provide in person teaching. Find it baffling that pubs are still open and nail saloons etc etc etc but 'it is not safe to do lectures in person'.

IT IS ALL ABOUT THE MONEY. That's the be all and end all of it.

But lets face it. I will be the same as last year. A-levels and GCSEs will be awarded via predicted grades. How can they not with students being out of education since March and attendance overall extremely poor with some schools being shut. The same will be true of universities they will have a non detriment policy in place.
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firestarter-
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(Original post by adam271)
I dont mind if they do. Maybe they should.
But they need to deal with the issue of accommodation.

How is it right that they dont let students move back home and force them to stay on campus due to rental agreements with accommodation? If I move back home I still have to pay for accommodation that I am not using.
Students should refuse to pay en masse. Poll tax style.
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SomeWelshGuy123
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(Original post by firestarter-)
Students should refuse to pay en masse. Poll tax style.
Everyone said that during the constant strikes for the last four years. At least you lot can have online teaching, for the equivalent of half my degree the academic staff were on strike, didnt even have access to online resources. In 3 years I had a total of like 40 weeks of actual Uni education.
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firestarter-
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(Original post by SomeWelshGuy123)
Everyone said that during the constant strikes for the last four years. At least you lot can have online teaching, for the equivalent of half my degree the academic staff were on strike, didnt even have access to online resources. In 3 years I had a total of like 40 weeks of actual Uni education.
Could you not have transferred?

The problem of students being trapped in accommodation, just so universities can charge them for it, amidst a spiralling pandemic, is of an altogether different magnitude.
Last edited by firestarter-; 3 weeks ago
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CharlieBrownSays
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(Original post by firestarter-)
As pointed out above, for students at some universities it already is. I don't see how anyone can possibly justify £9250 fees for online courses when the most experienced provider of online courses, the OU, charges a fraction of that.

Students should return home before they find themselves stranded in quarantine, refuse to pay a penny to the institutions that put them in this position and enrol with the OU this spring. If the full University experience is important to them they can transfer their credit once this fiasco is over.
I’ve seen online postgrad for more than 9250 without Covid
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CharlieBrownSays
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(Original post by adam271)
I dont mind if they do. Maybe they should.
But they need to deal with the issue of accommodation.

How is it right that they dont let students move back home and force them to stay on campus due to rental agreements with accommodation? If I move back home I still have to pay for accommodation that I am not using.

Universities wont do it because they need the money and that's more important to them then what is right.


So assuming universities are not going to let people exit their tenancy agreements then they should absolutely continue to provide in person teaching. Find it baffling that pubs are still open and nail saloons etc etc etc but 'it is not safe to do lectures in person'.

IT IS ALL ABOUT THE MONEY. That's the be all and end all of it.

But lets face it. I will be the same as last year. A-levels and GCSEs will be awarded via predicted grades. How can they not with students being out of education since March and attendance overall extremely poor with some schools being shut. The same will be true of universities they will have a non detriment policy in place.
Universities are underfunded. It’s about the government
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ROTL94
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(Original post by IanDangerously)
This has now happened at both unis in Manchester I believe due to the majority of students being quarantined in their apartments.
Yes, and Sheffield which had 500 COVID cases alone. I will be very surprised if the majority of students receive any face to face teaching after Christmas.
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Ramipril
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(Original post by ROTL94)
Yes, and Sheffield which had 500 COVID cases alone. I will be very surprised if the majority of students receive any face to face teaching after Christmas.
Do you know if it's all courses that are now online? Or are the one that actually need to be face-to-face, such as medicine, dentistry etc. still having their in-person learning?
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