Th3ArtfulDodger
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Hi

I have a few questions regarding economics and the personal statement

1. How much of an importance does Warwick, UCL and Cambridge place on having chosen Further Math? (When choosing my options I wanted to pursue politics and chose Economics, Math, History and Sociology, which I dropped last week)

2. In my personal statement do I need to define subject-related terms or should I assume the admissions tutor is know what i'm talking about?

3. Can i write a purely academical personal statement or am I meant to talk about extra-curriculars despite having no significance nor relevance to economics?
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Mona123456
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(Original post by Th3ArtfulDodger)
Hi

I have a few questions regarding economics and the personal statement

1. How much of an importance does Warwick, UCL and Cambridge place on having chosen Further Math? (When choosing my options I wanted to pursue politics and chose Economics, Math, History and Sociology, which I dropped last week)

2. In my personal statement do I need to define subject-related terms or should I assume the admissions tutor is know what i'm talking about?

3. Can i write a purely academical personal statement or am I meant to talk about extra-curriculars despite having no significance nor relevance to economics?

Hi there,

I’ll do my best to answer your questions (last year I applied to Economics degrees) but please bear in mind that I’m not an Admissions Tutor, so these are only my opinions from research I did.

1) I don’t know about UCL, but for Cambridge and Warwick at least, having FM is strongly desired. For Cambridge, I think it is essentially an implicit pre-requisite; the only people I’ve heard of who didn’t do FM and got in are those who maybe only took AS but had extenuating circumstances. Even if it isn’t offered at your school, I’m fairly sure Cambridge mention somewhere on their website that they’d like you to self teach it. For Warwick, having FM is slightly less important but still advantageous; Economics is one of their most competitive courses, so ultimately a lot of people applying to Oxford/Cambridge/LSE also apply to Warwick, meaning a high proportion of applicants offer FM.

2) You can almost always assume that the tutors will know what you’re on about; you should spend less time defining terms and more time explaining your opinions or things you learnt from supercurriculars, and how they make you a better economist or link to University studies.

3) For top Unis, you can do a purely academic personal statement, however as you should be applying to Universities with a range of requirements, some like you to mention extracurriculars. I would recommend having 1-3 lines on extracurriculars and link them back to your degree through e.g. highlighting the soft skills you gained, but if you choose to have no mention of extracurriculars you would probably get away with it.

Best of luck with your applications!
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Th3ArtfulDodger
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(Original post by Mona123456)
Hi there,

I’ll do my best to answer your questions (last year I applied to Economics degrees) but please bear in mind that I’m not an Admissions Tutor, so these are only my opinions from research I did.

1) I don’t know about UCL, but for Cambridge and Warwick at least, having FM is strongly desired. For Cambridge, I think it is essentially an implicit pre-requisite; the only people I’ve heard of who didn’t do FM and got in are those who maybe only took AS but had extenuating circumstances. Even if it isn’t offered at your school, I’m fairly sure Cambridge mention somewhere on their website that they’d like you to self teach it. For Warwick, having FM is slightly less important but still advantageous; Economics is one of their most competitive courses, so ultimately a lot of people applying to Oxford/Cambridge/LSE also apply to Warwick, meaning a high proportion of applicants offer FM.

2) You can almost always assume that the tutors will know what you’re on about; you should spend less time defining terms and more time explaining your opinions or things you learnt from supercurriculars, and how they make you a better economist or link to University studies.

3) For top Unis, you can do a purely academic personal statement, however as you should be applying to Universities with a range of requirements, some like you to mention extracurriculars. I would recommend having 1-3 lines on extracurriculars and link them back to your degree through e.g. highlighting the soft skills you gained, but if you choose to have no mention of extracurriculars you would probably get away with it.

Best of luck with your applications!
tysm
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