celiaeb
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How do I get the best ELAT score? Looking for good tips, can't find much anywhere...
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Confusedboutlife
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(Original post by celiaeb)
How do I get the best ELAT score? Looking for good tips, can't find much anywhere...
- Practice answers (doesn't have to be timed at first). Take time to PLAN!
- Spend a lot of time looking at the sample essays and see which ones did better and worse. Why do you think that is, in terms of the way the essays are structured, written? Are you surprised? Same for mark scheme: really look closely at what it is saying.

My tips:
1. Write in clear short sentences all the way through.
2. Have a very clear focus in your intro which makes a clear contrast between the two extracts (eg. extract 1's speaker confronts the storm to overcome it, extract 2's speaker avoids it). Stick to this focus for your whole essay! There's a sample essay from 2015 (?) which did the best (I think the theme was memory) that is a fantastic example of how to structure your essay. Probably best to switch between the two extracts frequently but in a controlled way.
3. Doing lots of 'alternative readings' can derail you from sticking to your focus so best to avoid.
4. Pay close attention to language features (short frequent quotes). Think about sensory language, metaphor, simile, polyptoton, ploce, anaphora, epistrophe (probs enough fancy rhetorical words, don't need to overdo it here). If you're doing a poem think about rhyme and form (I didn't learn these but being able to recognise a ballad or villanelle might help). Ditto with dialogue/ stage directions for drama. I did prose in my exam cos I didn't want to worry about this.
5. Grammatical terms are also helpful (preposition, verb, abstract noun etc).
6. Remember no marks for tropes/ historical context. ELAT isn't about generalising but being very specific!
7. Try not to be descriptive but analyse instead (using word suggest/ or implies a lot gets of you out of this issue).
8. Remember its only one part of your application, mainly used for shortlisting, so don't worry too much if things don't go perfect. I ran out of time (small intro, 2 main body paras instead of 3, conclusion) and still did well, just getting into the top band. I have friends who got 40 and made up for it with other parts of their application.
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celiaeb
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(Original post by Confusedboutlife)
- Practice answers (doesn't have to be timed at first). Take time to PLAN!
- Spend a lot of time looking at the sample essays and see which ones did better and worse. Why do you think that is, in terms of the way the essays are structured, written? Are you surprised? Same for mark scheme: really look closely at what it is saying.

My tips:
1. Write in clear short sentences all the way through.
2. Have a very clear focus in your intro which makes a clear contrast between the two extracts (eg. extract 1's speaker confronts the storm to overcome it, extract 2's speaker avoids it). Stick to this focus for your whole essay! There's a sample essay from 2015 (?) which did the best (I think the theme was memory) that is a fantastic example of how to structure your essay. Probably best to switch between the two extracts frequently but in a controlled way.
3. Doing lots of 'alternative readings' can derail you from sticking to your focus so best to avoid.
4. Pay close attention to language features (short frequent quotes). Think about sensory language, metaphor, simile, polyptoton, ploce, anaphora, epistrophe (probs enough fancy rhetorical words, don't need to overdo it here). If you're doing a poem think about rhyme and form (I didn't learn these but being able to recognise a ballad or villanelle might help). Ditto with dialogue/ stage directions for drama. I did prose in my exam cos I didn't want to worry about this.
5. Grammatical terms are also helpful (preposition, verb, abstract noun etc).
6. Remember no marks for tropes/ historical context. ELAT isn't about generalising but being very specific!
7. Try not to be descriptive but analyse instead (using word suggest/ or implies a lot gets of you out of this issue).
8. Remember its only one part of your application, mainly used for shortlisting, so don't worry too much if things don't go perfect. I ran out of time (small intro, 2 main body paras instead of 3, conclusion) and still did well, just getting into the top band. I have friends who got 40 and made up for it with other parts of their application.
Thank you so much, this is incredibly helpful!!
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