entry requirements as grades vs. as points

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qq51204
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If a course requires AAA, 144 UCAS Points, is simply reaching 144 Points enough? I'm doing an EPQ which will give me extra points. So if my grades are ABB (128 Points) and I get at least a C in the EPQ (16 Points, reaching 144 Points), do I meet the entry requirements? Or is requiring AAA not the same as requiring 144 Points?
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gracelrobineon
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it depends which uni. if you look on their page most unis say whether they lower entry requirements if you do an epq. which uni are you looking at? i know southampton take into account an epq and lower the entry requirements by a grade if you do well in it
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AliceRoseGuy
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(Original post by qq51204)
If a course requires AAA, 144 UCAS Points, is simply reaching 144 Points enough? I'm doing an EPQ which will give me extra points. So if my grades are ABB (128 Points) and I get at least a C in the EPQ (16 Points, reaching 144 Points), do I meet the entry requirements? Or is requiring AAA not the same as requiring 144 Points?
I believe its whatever is equivalent to AAA , plus a top grade in the course subject that you intend to take, So like, If you wanna do Psychology you would probably want at least an A in that and the other subjects at at least a B level
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qq51204
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(Original post by gracelrobineon)
it depends which uni. if you look on their page most unis say whether they lower entry requirements if you do an epq. which uni are you looking at? i know southampton take into account an epq and lower the entry requirements by a grade if you do well in it
i'm looking at kings, but it's aspirational. it's a general question tho so i can apply the same logic to other unis.
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qq51204
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(Original post by AliceRoseGuy)
I believe its whatever is equivalent to AAA , plus a top grade in the course subject that you intend to take, So like, If you wanna do Psychology you would probably want at least an A in that and the other subjects at at least a B level
ah that makes sense, i wanna do computer science but most unis only require maths for that - so should i focus more on maths or computer science ?
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by qq51204)
i'm looking at kings, but it's aspirational. it's a general question tho so i can apply the same logic to other unis.
Usually universities requiring AAA actually require those grades not UCAS points which are normally offered by lower graded universities. The points system is usually based on 3 A levels alone.
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AliceRoseGuy
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(Original post by qq51204)
If a course requires AAA, 144 UCAS Points, is simply reaching 144 Points enough? I'm doing an EPQ which will give me extra points. So if my grades are ABB (128 Points) and I get at least a C in the EPQ (16 Points, reaching 144 Points), do I meet the entry requirements? Or is requiring AAA not the same as requiring 144 Points?
It also might be worth contacting the university and asking about this, there may be things such as contexual offers depending on your circumstances.

I would personally aim to get AAA in the A levels, having the other qualification boost your ucas points making you a strong candidate for an offer, but do some research beforehand. Hope this helps. Might see you in Kings
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gracelrobineon
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(Original post by qq51204)
ah that makes sense, i wanna do computer science but most unis only require maths for that - so should i focus more on maths or computer science ?
i’d say focus on both - you’d stand out more from the rest - although if you are able to only focus on one i’d say maths as it’s a more traditional subject and would be recognised as the better a level
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qq51204
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(Original post by AliceRoseGuy)
It also might be worth contacting the university and asking about this, there may be things such as contexual offers depending on your circumstances.

I would personally aim to get AAA in the A levels, having the other qualification boost your ucas points making you a strong candidate for an offer, but do some research beforehand. Hope this helps. Might see you in Kings
i was considering that but thought it might be a standardised thing, i guess not though. my predicted grades were lower than what i think i'll get (messed up a lot of work during lockdown) so i know i'll get higher (aiming AAA). but yeah having both will probably help a lot, thanks for the advice. and ahh of course
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qq51204
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(Original post by gracelrobineon)
i’d say focus on both - you’d stand out more from the rest - although if you are able to only focus on one i’d say maths as it’s a more traditional subject and would be recognised as the better a level
yeah that makes sense. i was assuming maths would be the choice for the same reasons, but yeah both are doable.
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qq51204
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
Usually universities requiring AAA actually require those grades not UCAS points which are normally offered by lower graded universities. The points system is usually based on 3 A levels alone.
so russell group universities etc. would require the grades they state, as opposed to other unis which would allow the epq to alter the requirement as it adds to the points?
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AliceRoseGuy
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(Original post by gracelrobineon)
i’d say focus on both - you’d stand out more from the rest - although if you are able to only focus on one i’d say maths as it’s a more traditional subject and would be recognised as the better a level
I would have to agree with both. I would try to spread your focus evenly with maths and computer science. There are many crossovers ( my partner did a maths degree and a computer science degree). Focusing entirely on just one subject and allowing the other one to slip sounds like a recipe for disaster. I would suggest that you also make a decision based upon any grades that your teacher has given you, and adjust to your needs. If you are doing great in maths for example, spend just a little bit more time on the computer science, but don't abandon one whole subject. Keep practising both. You can do it
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qq51204
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(Original post by AliceRoseGuy)
I would have to agree with both. I would try to spread your focus evenly with maths and computer science. There are many crossovers ( my partner did a maths degree and a computer science degree). Focusing entirely on just one subject and allowing the other one to slip sounds like a recipe for disaster. I would suggest that you also make a decision based upon any grades that your teacher has given you, and adjust to your needs. If you are doing great in maths for example, spend just a little bit more time on the computer science, but don't abandon one whole subject. Keep practising both. You can do it
yeahh there is a lot of crossover, they're linked in a lot of ways. i think one of them does need more effort, but if i'm slipping in another then i would definitely focus on it instead, as well as my third subject. i want to do equally as good in both maths and computer science though, if not all three of them. and thank you! you too of courseee
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McGinger
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(Original post by qq51204)
so russell group universities etc. would require the grades they state, as opposed to other unis which would allow the epq to alter the requirement as it adds to the points?
1) RG and other Unis that quote their entry requirements in grades will not accept 'total points'. They want the grades they have specified in the subjects they have specified, and in 3 A levels. Some may put an EPQ condition in their offer - or something like 'AAA or AAB plus A in EPQ' or whatever, but they usually wont regard an EPQ as a substitute for an entire A level.
2) To find out how each Uni treats EPQ you need to either check carefully on each course page, or email them each and ask. They will all be different.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by qq51204)
i'm looking at kings, but it's aspirational. it's a general question tho so i can apply the same logic to other unis.
Kings are a highly competitive uni so if they ask for AAA then mean AAA but less competitive unis may be more flexible and give offers based on points.
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