I think I may have ocd.

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
I know I shouldn’t self diagnose but I think I have ocd. I have done a lot of research and I have a most of the ‘symptoms’ predominantly the intrusive thoughts etc. And I don’t really know what do to, I’ve suspected this for a while and I’ve had issues with anxiety for years. I’ve tried talking to my parents but they tell me to ‘snap out off it’ or say it’s ‘all in my head’ but I’m worried about myself and I don’t know what to do. Please help me if you can.
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
Go to the dr and ask for a referral to your local mental health team who can properly diagnose you
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by Pchim)
Go to the dr and ask for a referral to your local mental health team who can properly diagnose you
I’m only 15 my parents will find out and doctors are currently closed where I live due to covid.
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
Your dr should keep your information confidential, most health centres are offering phone appointments so try ringing your gp and ask for a phone appointment. Do you have a mobile you can tell them to ring?

Other than that there are some resources online for self help, if you think it would help you can try printing off some information for your parents.

You could ring the samaritans if things are getting overwhelming and you need to talk (Samaritans can be emailed too). Maybe you have a school teacher you trust who you can talk to? They might be able to help you get help or talk to your oarents for you.
0
reply
Snarly_Charlie
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
Dr. Google does not exist. People seriously need to stop looking up their symptoms online, because chances are fear will only arise. There are plenty of hypochondriacs in the world, who will end up panicking and believing there is something wrong with them. They should simply pay a visit to the doctors surgery and seek professional help.
1
reply
DiddyDec
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Anonymous)
I’m only 15 my parents will find out and doctors are currently closed where I live due to covid.
You can book your own appointments and your parents have no right to know about it. Your GP will not be closed, they will be doing telephone appointments.
0
reply
DiddyDec
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by Snarly_Charlie)
Dr. Google does not exist. People seriously need to stop looking up their symptoms online, because chances are fear will only arise. There are plenty of hypochondriacs in the world, who will end up panicking and believing there is something wrong with them. They should simply pay a visit to the doctors surgery and seek professional help.
That is really unhelpful advice. Going to the doctor with an idea of what may be the problem based on evidence actually helps to work out what the problem could be.
0
reply
Snarly_Charlie
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by DiddyDec)
That is really unhelpful advice. Going to the doctor with an idea of what may be the problem based on evidence actually helps to work out what the problem could be.
You're wrong, but believe what you want. All I meant by my comment is going to the doctor's surgery is actually the best thing one could do.
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
If you think you have something as serious as ocd wouldnt you want your parents to know? Also dont you think theyd notice by now because ocd isnt something you can hide. It involves alot of rituals and impulsive looking behaviour for example doing things in groups of 3s and touching objects a certain amount of times to prevent people around you being harmed
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by Pchim)
If you think you have something as serious as ocd wouldnt you want your parents to know? Also dont you think theyd notice by now because ocd isnt something you can hide. It involves alot of rituals and impulsive looking behaviour for example doing things in groups of 3s and touching objects a certain amount of times to prevent people around you being harmed
It sounds like op has tried to tell their parents and they are blowing it off as nothing, I can see why the parents finding out might lead to an argument and why op would want to avoid that. It sucks that the parents are being that awful as to neglect a medical condition that can be treated.

OCD comes in quite a lot of different variants too, some of which can be hidden for a long time (my parents didnt notice anything was up until after a year). They haven't given much info as to the extent or nature of their condition, so it's impossible for us to be able to judge. All we know is that it is distressing enough for OP to be concerned about themself, look up their symptoms online and see similarites to OCD.

Only a doctor will be able to ascertain if they meet the diagnostic criteria. Even if they don't qualify as having OCD it could be in it's beginning stages and they might need help to manage their thoughts / actions and stop it from escalating into full blown OCD.
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by Pchim)
If you think you have something as serious as ocd wouldnt you want your parents to know? Also dont you think theyd notice by now because ocd isnt something you can hide. It involves alot of rituals and impulsive looking behaviour for example doing things in groups of 3s and touching objects a certain amount of times to prevent people around you being harmed
OCD is not generally as accepted as some other forms of anxiety.

The general population are terrible at spotting OCD, people have busy lives and are wrapped up with their own problems so shrug off OCD-like symptoms as just a bit odd. It can even be like that for someone who lives with someone else. This is how it's been for thousands of years.
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
Im speaking as someone with diagnosed and medicated ocd. I feel like routines and rituals are impossible to hide and people would pick up on it very easily. Although I agree that ocd isnt what people think it looks like. For example i am a very clean person but id say my clean room isnt a sign at all that im ocd although thats what people think it is. My ocd is manageable on medication but when off i can get little ticks and become very stressed and overwhelmed if things cant be done a certain way. Its like your brain is actually telling your body its in danger of dying. I feel like even a parent who was trying not to notice would notice something like ocd which makes me think that in looking at google you are misdiagnosing with potentially something else. Its a good idea to go into the gp or in your case go into the phone call having a idea and suggestions but its also important to have a open mind. You know if somethings off. But the best thing would be to get referral to the local mental health team to do a proper observation of your behaviour. You are young so i would say that it will be hard to hide this from parents and you may just have to do it and then let them deal with it. Also if you can speak to your head of year in school they can do in school appointments with a health team but they dont have any ability to diagnose and are overall abit crap. What symptoms are you showing that make you feel its ocd?? And did you research ocd first or did you google your symptoms and come across ocd??
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by marinade)
OCD is not generally as accepted as some other forms of anxiety.

The general population are terrible at spotting OCD, people have busy lives and are wrapped up with their own problems so shrug off OCD-like symptoms as just a bit odd. It can even be like that for someone who lives with someone else. This is how it's been for thousands of years.
I find my ocd was spotted very quickly. Its their mothers instinct to pick up if something is off with them even if they don’t recognise it as ocd. Either way its no good hiding it from their parents. You cant fight the power of your brain alone without support. Everyone needs help
0
reply
ROTL94
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 weeks ago
#14
If they say it's all in your head then say 'Exactly, that's what a mental illness is, glad you understand.'
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#15
Report 4 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by ROTL94)
If they say it's all in your head then say 'Exactly, that's what a mental illness is, glad you understand.'
Sometimes i need to be told its in my head. I have hallucinations that i find hard to tell if real or my imagination. Sometimes side effects can seem very real when they are a figment of imagination. If someone says this to me i take it as them reassuring me that im not in any danger
0
reply
ROTL94
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by Pchim)
Sometimes i need to be told its in my head. I have hallucinations that i find hard to tell if real or my imagination. Sometimes side effects can seem very real when they are a figment of imagination. If someone says this to me i take it as them reassuring me that im not in any danger
I know what you mean, my ex had it. Schizoaffective OCD to be precise. It's a bit different for OP though because when people say it to them they're not trying to make them feel better, they're just trying to undermine them and make them out to be ridiculous.
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#17
Report 4 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by ROTL94)
I know what you mean, my ex had it. Schizoaffective OCD to be precise. It's a bit different for OP though because when people say it to them they're not trying to make them feel better, they're just trying to undermine them and make them out to be ridiculous.
Im also aspergers so my ocd is almost a symptom of that so sometimes i dont fully understand. If i really thought i had ocd and people were undermining me id just push against them and go to the dr asap and get proof to rub it in all their faces🙈 i do find a solid diagnosis gives you peace of mind
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by Pchim)
I find my ocd was spotted very quickly. Its their mothers instinct to pick up if something is off with them even if they don’t recognise it as ocd. Either way its no good hiding it from their parents. You cant fight the power of your brain alone without support. Everyone needs help
They need to go to the doctor. Unfortunately in this case the family support isn't there, but it may be able to be turned around with a lot of work.

You are unbelievably fortunate that it's been picked up of which I'm glad. I'm not sure why you have the views that you do that parents and society pick OCD up, but I can't say I agree in the slightest. I have a close relative who had OCD and it took many years to get a diagnosis, I could post that on this thread originally, but it's not that helpful. I've spoken in person to probably a couple of hundred people in depth with diagnosed OCD and it's normally picked up after other diagnoses and later on.

I regard it as an open and nuanced question about disclosure of mental health to families. Some have amazingly supportive families, others have the polar opposite. A lot of in the middle cases that are hard to work out where things are at.

There are services that run in many cities for 13-15 upwards that may be able to offer help and advice and the journey to a diagnosis (or if there isn't anything or something else there). This is often where schools/GP send people to.

Everyone needs help, but the numbers are that something like 70%+ of people with anxiety get no treatment.
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#19
Report 4 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by marinade)
They need to go to the doctor. Unfortunately in this case the family support isn't there, but it may be able to be turned around with a lot of work.

You are unbelievably fortunate that it's been picked up of which I'm glad. I'm not sure why you have the views that you do that parents and society pick OCD up, but I can't say I agree in the slightest. I have a close relative who had OCD and it took many years to get a diagnosis, I could post that on this thread originally, but it's not that helpful. I've spoken in person to probably a couple of hundred people in depth with diagnosed OCD and it's normally picked up after other diagnoses and later on.

I regard it as an open and nuanced question about disclosure of mental health to families. Some have amazingly supportive families, others have the polar opposite. A lot of in the middle cases that are hard to work out where things are at.

There are services that run in many cities for 13-15 upwards that may be able to offer help and advice and the journey to a diagnosis (or if there isn't anything or something else there). This is often where schools/GP send people to.

Everyone needs help, but the numbers are that something like 70%+ of people with anxiety get no treatment.
Im referring to if you have ocd to the point where you are feeling like you need treatment id assume its showing very obviously in day to day life. If they cant go to the drs then nothing can be done. I agree not everyone is supportive id recommend they have a phone appointment with their gp and get the process started anyway and leave the family to just accept it in their own time
0
reply
Pchim
Badges: 11
#20
Report 4 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by Pchim)
Im referring to if you have ocd to the point where you are feeling like you need treatment id assume its showing very obviously in day to day life. If they cant go to the drs then nothing can be done. I agree not everyone is supportive id recommend they have a phone appointment with their gp and get the process started anyway and leave the family to just accept it in their own time
If its something they are actively worried about they need therapy or something and that can only be done through gp first so they dont have many options unfortunately and pushing for help is priority
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (176)
14.52%
I'm not sure (56)
4.62%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (355)
29.29%
I have already dropped out (35)
2.89%
I'm not a current university student (590)
48.68%

Watched Threads

View All