Brain need help
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Do doctors make friends outside of medicine? What kind of jobs do these friends do?
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JustOneMoreThing
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Sure they do, of course, it's likely that their social circle will revolve around their work because of their hours but you can still make friends outside.

Charity work and sports/health clubs are great places to socialise
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ecolier
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(Original post by Brain need help)
Do doctors make friends outside of medicine?
:lol: Yes!

What kind of jobs do these friends do?
All jobs? We are still normal people you know :laugh:

So there's people you meet at Uni, your family and family friends, people you meet when you go out, your neighbours, as said above - clubs and other social events, people you work with etc. etc.
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boulderingislife
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(Original post by Brain need help)
Do doctors make friends outside of medicine? What kind of jobs do these friends do?
I got a few doctor friends. They hang out with all kinds of people. I’m a data analyst and my doctor friend’s bf is some kind of graphic designer/arty thing.

Some docs only hang around other docs but they do that cos they have egos and think they are superior to everyone else. Not all doctors are like that.
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ecolier
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(Original post by boulderingislife)
...Some docs only hang around other docs but they do that cos they have egos and think they are superior to everyone else. Not all doctors are like that.
Or because their working life dictates that they can't really have many friends outside of work? Especially during the junior doctor years.

I have loads of PT / OT / SALT / dietitician / nursing friends but that's because I knew them from work. Obviously I have even more doctor friends.

Basically from university onwards, medics tend to stick together (longer course compared to others) so it's no surprise that most medic friends are also medics. Most doctors' life is virtually dominated by it.

Saying that I am looking for more friends outside of the medical field, hence I am on TSR :rofl:
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ROTL94
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No, once they graduate medical school they are required to cast off all former friendships they may have had and they are only allowed to have carefully selected NHS approved friends, if they have non medical friends they get struck off.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ROTL94)
No, once they graduate medical school they are required to cast off all former friendships they may have had and they are only allowed to have carefully selected NHS approved friends, if they have non medical friends they get struck off.
What about family?
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ROTL94
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(Original post by ecolier)
What about family?
Provisionally approved, but they're on thin ice.
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boulderingislife
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(Original post by ecolier)
Or because their working life dictates that they can't really have many friends outside of work? Especially during the junior doctor years.

I have loads of PT / OT / SALT / dietitician / nursing friends but that's because I knew them from work. Obviously I have even more doctor friends.

Basically from university onwards, medics tend to stick together (longer course compared to others) so it's no surprise that most medic friends are also medics. Most doctors' life is virtually dominated by it.

Saying that I am looking for more friends outside of the medical field, hence I am on TSR :rofl:
I’ve met docs who only hang around with other docs and they act like they are superior to everyone else. Talk like posh spoilt brats. Not a fan of people who don’t expand their horizons. I’ve got friends from all walks of life from doctors to actuaries to teachers and lawyers to people in marketing, those who work at climbing gym, those that teach yoga, those that work in supermarkets and make climbing holds, those that are students, and some who are retired!

I think it’s important to get to know people from all walks of life so you have a better understanding of the real world. Credit to you for wanting to expand your network. Though chatting to people here isn’t the best way. Go meet people in real life.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ROTL94)
Provisionally approved, but they're on thin ice.
That's actually more generous that I thought. Really was thinking I had to disown them for a second.

(Original post by boulderingislife)
...I think it’s important to get to know people from all walks of life so you have a better understanding of the real world. Credit to you for wanting to expand your network. Though chatting to people here isn’t the best way. Go meet people in real life.
:lol: It's a joke, of course I meet loads of other people in real life
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Isinglass
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(Original post by ROTL94)
No, once they graduate medical school they are required to cast off all former friendships they may have had and they are only allowed to have carefully selected NHS approved friends, if they have non medical friends they get struck off.
But once they have built up enough of a reputation within the NHS, they can move into the private sector, at which point, they will be free to make friends with the wider community, or at least accountants...

((Mainly) joking here, folks🙂).
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Brain need help
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(Original post by ecolier)
:lol: Yes!

So there's people you meet at Uni, your family and family friends, people you meet when you go out, your neighbours, as said above - clubs and other social events, people you work with etc. etc.
If this is true, do medical students and doctors really get time to make such friends? I always thought that medicine was so restrictive in the friends you have, and your lifestyle?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Brain need help)
If this is true, do medical students and doctors really get time to make such friends? I always thought that medicine was so restrictive in the friends you have, and your lifestyle?
It depends on your personality, but there is still time if you're organised.

And remember, (hopefully) you're not a junior doctor forever!

Surely, judging by the amount of doctors just here on TSR you'd think that we're not slaves to the NHS!
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Brain need help
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(Original post by ecolier)
It depends on your personality, but there is still time if you're organised.

And remember, (hopefully) you're not a junior doctor forever!
Sorry about all these questions but the average working hours for medical professionals/ specialists etc is 9am - 5pm. But then why do people claim that don't have a work-life balance? Is it because of the intensity or??
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Mesopotamian.
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They’ll almost definitely have at least one dentist friend, I can vouch for that, especially if they go to a medical school which has a dental school sibling :lol:
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ecolier
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(Original post by Brain need help)
Sorry about all these questions but the average working hours for medical professionals/ specialists etc is 9am - 5pm. But then why do people claim that don't have a work-life balance? Is it because of the intensity or??
You said it - specialists. I was talking about junior doctors, I don't think there are many consultants and GPs here on TSR (I think there's less than 10).

Once you're senior, the work-life balance start to get better for most specialties. But even then, the working hours is definitely not 9-5 on average, most specialty doctors will still have to do on-calls.
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boulderingislife
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(Original post by ecolier)
:lol: It's a joke, of course I meet loads of other people in real life
stop trolling me
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Brain need help
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(Original post by ecolier)
You said it - specialists. I was talking about junior doctors, I don't think there are many consultants and GPs here on TSR (I think there's less than 10).

Once you're senior, the work-life balance start to get better for most specialties. But even then, the working hours is definitely not 9-5 on average, most specialty doctors will still have to do on-calls.
I'm not really fond of the time constraints that pursuing medicine endows (this hectic life where life outside medicine is almost impossible). But I love the satisfaction of helping others, and working hard to play hard. But why does being a doctor have to be so intense! surely there's something I can do to still work as a physician and have more time on my hands?
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chopingirl
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tbh I doubt they make many new friends outside of medicine unless it's through a regular hobby they do like weekly mountain cllimbing or something...which is unlikely as they wouldn't have the time. So I reckon, although I am very unqualified to say, that they have their old friends from school/uni who have professional jobs like lawyers and teachers because they were all clever geeks together at school and uni (they probly weren't friends with the popular bimbo/chads), but they don't make many new friends outside their work now.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Brain need help)
I'm not really fond of the time constraints that pursuing medicine endows (this hectic life where life outside medicine is almost impossible). But I love the satisfaction of helping others, and working hard to play hard. But why does being a doctor have to be so intense! surely there's something I can do to still work as a physician and have more time on my hands?
Have a look at Physician associates, most of them only work 9-5.

You'd really have to be dedicated to medicine to succeed. That's why I keep saying on TSR, if you're thinking of Medicine or something else, do something else.

(there are lots of other negatives that I haven't even mentioned in this thread)

(Original post by chopingirl)
tbh I doubt they make many new friends outside of medicine unless it's through a regular hobby they do like weekly mountain cllimbing or something...which is unlikely as they wouldn't have the time. So I reckon, although I am very unqualified to say, that they have their old friends from school/uni who have professional jobs like lawyers and teachers because they were all clever geeks together at school and uni (they probly weren't friends with the popular bimbo/chads), but they don't make many new friends outside their work now.
Haha I love this :laugh:
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