Tallteacher
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Hi everyone,

First time post here.

I'm a mature student (also a man) studying primary teaching with QTS and I'm interested in thoughts around teaching early years vs general curriculum (older years). I'm currently streamed towards older years but have ideas that I may do well with early years also.

I'd be interested to hear all thoughts but especially day to day challenge comparisons, any gender based male teacher ideas, career advancement ins n outs and the challenges/difficulties I might encounter whether from colleagues, parents or pupils.

Many thanks for any responses.

Tall Teacher
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Tallteacher)
Hi everyone,

First time post here.

I'm a mature student (also a man) studying primary teaching with QTS and I'm interested in thoughts around teaching early years vs general curriculum (older years). I'm currently streamed towards older years but have ideas that I may do well with early years also.

I'd be interested to hear all thoughts but especially day to day challenge comparisons, any gender based male teacher ideas, career advancement ins n outs and the challenges/difficulties I might encounter whether from colleagues, parents or pupils.

Many thanks for any responses.

Tall Teacher
Most male Primary teachers I know tend to teach in KS2 but I do know of one in reception. Men do tend to find promotion a bit easier in my experience because many women seem to prefer just to teach. There a lot of pressure on Heads and Deputies in Primary because you haven't got a senior team like you have in Secondary.
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Tallteacher
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Hi. Thanks for your insights.

Plenty of pressure as a deputy or head, ok. Worth plenty of consideration if the time comes.

There's a 10:1 gender ratio on my course. This is mirrored in the primary sector, I'm told. I'm keen to know more about the effects this has on employment for men in primary. Pitfalls, advantages, disadvantages etc. All thoughts appreciated.
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bwilliams
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(Original post by Tallteacher)
Hi. Thanks for your insights.

Plenty of pressure as a deputy or head, ok. Worth plenty of consideration if the time comes.

There's a 10:1 gender ratio on my course. This is mirrored in the primary sector, I'm told. I'm keen to know more about the effects this has on employment for men in primary. Pitfalls, advantages, disadvantages etc. All thoughts appreciated.
Doesn't really affect employment. We employ the best candidate not if they are male vs female. The biggest myth is "men get jobs easier than woman" in primary. This is completely untrue. As a male, when I started, I found this to be the complete opposite. Men are seen to be stereotypically lazier than women (also untrue). However, in a female dominated profession, this stereotype does come through. Especially as there are less men so they encounter less 'good' men. If they encounter one man that isn't great, they stereotype it. Whereas if you encounter a woman they all blend in with the rest, if that makes sense.

I'd encourage you to explore EYFS and primary - they aren't really two separate entities. Reception is just as much a part of the school as Y1-6. Another myth: If you teach EYFS you can't teach primary and vice versa - untrue. If you teach KS1 and 2 it's vital you know where the children are coming from, the strategies used etc. Also, I have a child in KS2 at the moment that requires a lot of nurture provision that is very similar to EYFS so even in KS2 you may find yourself liaising with EYFS staff. The school is one big primary team.

I would say that if you did want career progression you would need to teach across the board ideally. The head is responsible for EYFS to KS2. You can't really manage something well that you don't know anything about. EYFS staff that stay EYFS staff don't usually progress past EYFS lead, in my experience (and many don't want to!! because that is their passion).

As above, lot's of pressure on primary SLT as, in most cases, you're going solo. There is no senior team to lend a listening ear. Leadership roles are usually quite lonely, in my experience. Usually a Head and two others maybe a deputy and two assistants max.

We have a Head and three assistant heads but we have a big and quite demanding school.
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Tallteacher
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A comprehensive response, hugely appreciated. I certainly aim to be one of the good/great primary men out there.

At this stage I'm completely open to all experiences/years and agree that a broad knowledge could only be an advantage, be it teacher or management.

Fab insights. Anyone else care to offer their perspective?
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