Is a law degree worth it anymore?

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9vns
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#1
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#1
Hi guys.
I’m currently a 3rd year politics and economics student and I am kind of considering switching to law but after the years I’ve spent studying this... I’ve realised it’s an extremely extremely competitive subject and field, that is oversaturated with a lot of graduates and the job market for law graduates is not the greatest.
I’m stuck in between doing data science as a masters or political economy.
Everything aside — I don’t really care about what I enjoy doing more because all of these I am equally as interested in as the other, and I owe that to how versatile my current degree is. I’m more interested in graduate prospects, the job market, how worth it is the degree, and all of that. I know I’d be happy studying all of them, but would I benefit from a law degree?
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Joleee
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what do you mean the job market for law grads is not the greatest? law is just as versatile in terms of job prospects as your degree.

you don’t need a law degree to become a lawyer if that’s what you’re thinking and you definitely don’t need a masters degree. if you’re reasoning for studying law is specifically for that reason i would say not worth it.
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buttercroissant
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I wouldn't suggest doing law because you can always switch to law later. I'm not too sure about the barrister route but I can advise you from the solicitor's route perspective. Imagine this, the modules LLB students study in 3 years, GDL (law conversion course) students do all the necessary modules to qualify (which is like half the modules in LLB degree) within 1 year. Not to mention, the LPC that all trainees must do, is once again a repetition of the modules that you did in LLB/GDL aside from vocational training, if you're interested in commercial law. The only advantage to doing LPC is if you want to specialise in IP or clinical negligence or any other area of law because then the firm wants you to take those modules that relate to your role in future. Anyway if you're particularly interested in some area of law and want as much experience as possible then maybe doing a law degree wouldn't be too bad otherwise you'll get sick of the same thing being repeated over and over again.
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MidgetFever
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(Original post by buttercroissant)
I wouldn't suggest doing law because you can always switch to law later. I'm not too sure about the barrister route but I can advise you from the solicitor's route perspective. Imagine this, the modules LLB students study in 3 years, GDL (law conversion course) students do all the necessary modules to qualify (which is like half the modules in LLB degree) within 1 year. Not to mention, the LPC that all trainees must do, is once again a repetition of the modules that you did in LLB/GDL aside from vocational training, if you're interested in commercial law. The only advantage to doing LPC is if you want to specialise in IP or clinical negligence or any other area of law because then the firm wants you to take those modules that relate to your role in future. Anyway if you're particularly interested in some area of law and want as much experience as possible then maybe doing a law degree wouldn't be too bad otherwise you'll get sick of the same thing being repeated over and over again.
This is all changing by the time OP graduates anyway, with the GDL & LPC being replaced with the SQE come September.
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buttercroissant
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(Original post by MidgetFever)
This is all changing by the time OP graduates anyway, with the GDL & LPC being replaced with the SQE come September.
And if you didn't know the SQE doesn't even allow you to specialise in a particular area of law such as IP or Clinical negligence. It's all basic modules that LLB/GDL students do. I don't know how they'll fill the gap of subjective diversity for solicitors with SQE
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MidgetFever
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(Original post by buttercroissant)
And if you didn't know the SQE doesn't even allow you to specialise in a particular area of law such as IP or Clinical negligence. It's all basic modules that LLB/GDL students do. I don't know how they'll fill the gap of subjective diversity for solicitors with SQE
With the SQE you still need to have 2 years legal experience prior to qualifying so I can imagine specialist subjects will still be covered under training contract electives.
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buttercroissant
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(Original post by MidgetFever)
With the SQE you still need to have 2 years legal experience prior to qualifying so I can imagine specialist subjects will still be covered under training contract electives.
I guess they won't have the privilege of familiarising themselves with the law before working those seats.
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MidgetFever
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(Original post by buttercroissant)
I guess they won't have the privilege of familiarising themselves with the law before working those seats.
Unfortunately not, but the same can be said for some seats regardless. I've seen some firms offering niche areas of law such as aviation litigation, yet not many universities I can imagine offer such as an undergrad module.
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buttercroissant
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Yes but excluding certain not-so-popular(?) areas in SQE seems heavily biased towards commercial law. It never sat well with me that clinical negligence wasn't advocated well enough by law firms. Law is a diverse subject - not just limited to commercial law. As time passes, other areas of law are slowly becoming obsolete. No wonder there's a saturation of aspiring commercial lawyers and less space to accommodate their dreams.
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17Student17
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Although a law degree with SQE1 immediately after it would mean you would have 3 years to do a lot of those niche subjects. I did taxation law for example , family law, competition and many others as well as the standard cores ones on my law degree Some of those have been very useful in my career and I would not have got my first job on qualification at a top 3 firm in a department of one of my subjects.
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