i'm seriously failing to understand how to fund a master's degree

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ashaxo99
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i'm in my third and final year of my Economics degree, and i am considering doing a masters in either economics and/or finance.

seeing as university prestige seems to matter for the finance/banking industry, all of the courses i am interested in at top universities are £20,000+. typically within the region of £30,000 to £36,000. of course this is absolutely impossible to afford, and i'm just extremely confused as to how people fund a master's education. do people typically work for a couple years before doing a masters? or just have savings/parental help?

i know that universities offer scholarships, but to apply in the first place, do you need to show proof of being able to fund it without obtaining a scholarship?
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Sentenced_to
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Most Master's are far less than that even at top universities (5K-15K). Unfortunately, most Business and some economics/finance Master’s are treated like cash cows by many Universities even though they are not subject to increased costs in order to provide them (no labs etc.). They are just able to sell them due to high demand and the "business" tag that is supposed to instantly pay for your investment (not always true obviously).

The plans that you mentioned are all legit (work a few years, use savings, parental help etc...)

You can also shop around and avoid atrocious fees from universities like LSE that just sell their name and charge gazillions for no other reason (and to add insult to injury teaching is $hit too)... Good luck!
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Diplomatic
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Savings from internships, scholarships, bursaries, the govt master's loan and some extra from Lendwise is how I afforded LSE. Most people I know on the master's courses are from wealthy backgrounds with families that pay, assuming they're here without those resources.
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PhoenixFortune
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I worked for 3 years before doing my masters so that I could live comfortably (and not have to work whilst studying). Others I know had parental financial support and also worked part-time.
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Domenico7
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(Original post by ashaxo99)
i'm in my third and final year of my Economics degree, and i am considering doing a masters in either economics and/or finance.

seeing as university prestige seems to matter for the finance/banking industry, all of the courses i am interested in at top universities are £20,000+. typically within the region of £30,000 to £36,000. of course this is absolutely impossible to afford, and i'm just extremely confused as to how people fund a master's education. do people typically work for a couple years before doing a masters? or just have savings/parental help?

i know that universities offer scholarships, but to apply in the first place, do you need to show proof of being able to fund it without obtaining a scholarship?
Hey! I've been working the past 4-5 years in construction, and I'm commencing my MSc in January (I'll be 27 by then).
I have taken a loan and grand from Student Finance Wales. I have some savings stashed away which I refuse to touch, and I'll have some money leftover from working which can be dipped into should the grant fall short later next year.
I know some people prefer to do a Master's immediately after their undergrad degree, but I'd say by having a break you gain more life experience, more of a view of what the working world is like and what you actually want. Additionally, I feel like I'll be far more applied during my MSc that I was 5 years back during my undergrad.
Good luck with everything!
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