peachmilk
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Only the posh people from private schools take that, it's not useful at all. It's not even a full A-level so why do it??
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acheloisina
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It’s not always useless. For me, ( someone who goes to a state school) it allows me to get into my course for lower entry requirements
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peachmilk
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(Original post by acheloisina)
It’s not always useless. For me, ( someone who goes to a state school) it allows me to get into my course for lower entry requirements
How? It's not even considered as a full A-level and most people from top unis don't take it.
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gullyyt
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(Original post by peachmilk)
Only the posh people from private schools take that, it's not useful at all. It's not even a full A-level so why do it??
Not useless at all, gives you something to talk about on your personal statement/at interviews if you have any
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peachmilk
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(Original post by gullyyt)
Not useless at all, gives you something to talk about on your personal statement/at interviews if you have any
Explain how? In the interview, you just talk about how much you love the subject you're taking and what extracurricular things you do outside of school.
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by peachmilk)
Only the posh people from private schools take that, it's not useful at all. It's not even a full A-level so why do it??
I learned really good skills about how to write an academic report which massively helped me in my degree.
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peachmilk
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(Original post by DrawTheLine)
I learned really good skills about how to write an academic report which massively helped me in my degree.
I thought you don't write an academic report? You do it on a subject but do you really think a 16 or 17-year-old would take up all their time researching and purchasing books on that?
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Rarest
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It can be useful in some cases, some unis (for example, Bath) will reduce their A level entry grades if you get an A in the EPQ.
I personally didn't do it, but I imagine that if I spent half a year working on a robotics/machine learning project, it would certainly boost my personal statement for computer science/maths.
Same goes for other subjects, my friend in economics did some research on black markets and other areas of economics and my friend wanting to do Aerospace managed to design and build a mini wind tunnel, both of these things boosted their personal statements significantly.
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gullyyt
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(Original post by peachmilk)
Explain how? In the interview, you just talk about how much you love the subject you're taking and what extracurricular things you do outside of school.
Yeah, to an extent. The EPQ is an opportunity to show how much you love the subject. I did my EPQ on something related to medicine and I used it as an example to show how interested I am in research. Also, the EPQ isn't a requirement so it falls under the 'super-curricular' category, which unis really like.
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Rarest
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(Original post by peachmilk)
Explain how? In the interview, you just talk about how much you love the subject you're taking and what extracurricular things you do outside of school.
If you chose your EPQ well, you can incorporate that very well into the 'how much you love the subject' part.
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fijitastic
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Clearly you haven't done your research. I may be biased since I am a private school student as you described but their are many advantages to EPQs. Firstly, like acheloisina said you can get lower entry requirements if you receive an A/A* in your EPQ. Not all universities offer this but the ones that do believe that EPQ's put you ahead of other student as it's one of the only times that you get to study independently and research everything by yourself, it gives you a taster of what university is like. Secondly, you learn lots of techniques in your EPQ such as harvard referencing which you normally wouldn't have known about before. I remember my friend going to uni and she had an assignment where the lecturer told them to use harvard referencing and because she took the EPQ she already knew how to do it when most of the other students couldn't. Thirdly, just because it's half an A Level doesn't mean it's not worth it. Yes, for subjects like medicine I don't think it makes much of a difference because they focus more on your grades, UCAT/BMAT score and interview. You get UCAS points from it and it's great to use on your personal statement. Definitely makes you stand out from your peers and shows you have a passion for the subject you want to study at uni (if that's what your EPQ is based on)
Last edited by fijitastic; 4 weeks ago
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Paracosm
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You're certainly entitled to that opinion. However, just because you think that, it doesn't make you right. My school and college were not private, my college was in an economically deprived area and actively encouraged people to take EPQ. Your opinion is based on nothing but class assumptions and conjecture.
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by peachmilk)
I thought you don't write an academic report? You do it on a subject but do you really think a 16 or 17-year-old would take up all their time researching and purchasing books on that?
I wrote an academic style research report. It can be a variety of things, some people did presentations. You don't purchase books. You just research online.
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peachmilk
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(Original post by gullyyt)
Yeah, to an extent. The EPQ is an opportunity to show how much you love the subject. I did my EPQ on something related to medicine and I used it as an example to show how interested I am in research. Also, the EPQ isn't a requirement so it falls under the 'super-curricular' category, which unis really like.
Alright but if EPQ took up all your time because you're doing it on a subject you don't thoroughly know, would you just turn up to the interview with A-level results and an EPQ without any extracurricular activities? How are you meant to compete with the other applicants?
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Torigracex
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I have a feeling you don’t really know much about EPQ. A lot of people do a mini dissertation for their product (you have to do a full one in uni), so it teaches you how to find sources, quote them properly in your writing, it’s fab essay writing practice etc etc etc. It helped me in interviews for uni because I did my essay on something very relatable to my course, so I was able to show I know a lot of information about an important topic (and guess what, I got in). It does in fact lower the entry requirements to many different unis and courses if you achieve a high enough grade, and I went to a state school and got an A* in it.
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boulderingislife
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(Original post by gullyyt)
Not useless at all, gives you something to talk about on your personal statement/at interviews if you have any
You (not personally you but a person who takes epq in general for their personal statement) must have a pretty boring existence if you need to take EPQ to have something to talk about in your personal statement :rolleyes:
Last edited by boulderingislife; 4 weeks ago
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peachmilk
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(Original post by Paracosm)
You're certainly entitled to that opinion. However, just because you think that, it doesn't make you right. My school and college were not private, my college was in an economically deprived area and actively encouraged people to take EPQ. Your opinion is based on nothing but class assumptions and conjecture.
I am right. I know many people who went to state sixth forms and they didn't take EPQ since it wasn't offered. I went on private school websites and of course, I found a whole essay about taking EPQ.
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gullyyt
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(Original post by peachmilk)
Alright but if EPQ took up all your time because you're doing it on a subject you don't thoroughly know, would you just turn up to the interview with A-level results and an EPQ without any extracurricular activities? How are you meant to compete with the other applicants?
I mean, you have like 6 months or something to complete it. It's supposed to be a long(ish)-term project. You build your knowledge as you go along and reflect on it. That's the entire point of the EPQ (according to my sixth form). Personally, I only found myself giving a few hours a week at the start. This meant that there was plenty of time to do my extracurriculars. Unless your time management absolutely sucks and you procrastinate until the very last minute- I don't see how it'd be an issue.
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Rarest
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(Original post by boulderingislife)
You must have a pretty boring existence if you need to take EPQ to have something to talk about in your personal statement :rolleyes:
It just gives you something extra to talk about
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peachmilk
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(Original post by gullyyt)
I mean, you have like 6 months or something to complete it. It's supposed to be a long(ish)-term project. You build your knowledge as you go along and reflect on it. That's the entire point of the EPQ (according to my sixth form). Personally, I only found myself giving a few hours a week at the start. This meant that there was plenty of time to do my extracurriculars. Unless your time management absolutely sucks and you procrastinate until the very last minute- I don't see how it'd be an issue.
Ok, but do your teachers look over your work or is it completely independent study?
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