How come some people look down on rented council houses/estates?

Watch
Paige26xx
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
I live in a council estate with my family, the house is theirs. It’s a lovely house. The neighbourhood is quite, no trouble, and all of the gardens and surrounding areas are well kept. I’ve heard bad things about council houses, especially if you rent, but why? Does it just depend on the house/estate? I mean I’ve seen some rough council estates. I’m not from a posh part of the U.K. but it’s not the worse, yet when I go to work in the posh part, some look down on me which I just can’t help but laugh at.
0
reply
RogerOxon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by Paige26xx)
I live in a council estate with my family, the house is theirs. It’s a lovely house. The neighbourhood is quite, no trouble, and all of the gardens and surrounding areas are well kept. I’ve heard bad things about council houses, especially if you rent, but why? Does it just depend on the house/estate? I mean I’ve seen some rough council estates. I’m not from a posh part of the U.K. but it’s not the worse, yet when I go to work in the posh part, some look down on me which I just can’t help but laugh at.
I suspect two issues; stereotypes and the houses being considered ugly.

There is the assumption that the occupants don't place much value on education, as they haven't the income to live elsewhere. This may lead to their children not being interested in it, and falling into crime. There certainly are estates where this is the most visible pattern, but, as with any stereotype, it's a gross generalisation.

Even when the houses are privately owned, many don't like to buy them because they're considered ugly. On the flip-side, they're often much better houses (e.g. larger rooms) than privately built ones, as they weren't built to maximise profit.

The most important thing, IMO, is the people and how they interact with each other. Looking down on anyone for where they live is daft.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
Paige26xx
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by RogerOxon)
I suspect two issues; stereotypes and the houses being considered ugly.

There is the assumption that the occupants don't place much value on education, as they haven't the income to live elsewhere. This may lead to their children not being interested in it, and falling into crime. There certainly are estates where this is the most visible pattern, but, as with any stereotype, it's a gross generalisation.

Even when the houses are privately owned, many don't like to buy them because they're considered ugly. On the flip-side, they're often much better houses (e.g. larger rooms) than privately built ones, as they weren't built to maximise profit.

The most important thing, IMO, is the people and how they interact with each other. Looking down on anyone for where they live is daft.
But there’s people round here off to Uni, have been to Uni etc. I’m at college. People in my family range from painter and decorators to accountants, and we live in council homes, a very small minority in private homes but that’s only down to convenience. I live with family who have had a very good career (retired now) and have bought their decent looking home years ago. Also, why would you presume someone has not much income coming in from living in a NICE council house may I ask? Just want to hear opinions. Also, why would someone with no education who may not of chose the college and uni life, get involved with crime? Sorry if I seem like I’m coming across defensive, I am just genuinely intrigued because I’ve lived in a wealthy area in the South of the city and here in Manchester, and I have no snobbery in me.
Last edited by Paige26xx; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
RogerOxon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by Paige26xx)
People in my family range from painter and decorators to accountants, and we live in council homes, some in private. I live with family who have had a very good career (retired now) and have bought their decent looking home years ago.
To be clear, I judge people on their merits, not where they live. I was just explainging how I think some people see council estates.

(Original post by Paige26xx)
But there’s people round here off to Uni, have been to Uni etc. I’m at college.
Frankly, it's not an achievement to get into a university now - some are a bit of a joke. There are a lot of non-academic course, so it's not really the same intellectual level (on average) as a few decades ago, although I'm certainly not belittling useful trades.

(Original post by Paige26xx)
Also, why would you presume someone has not much income coming in from living in a NICE council house may I ask?
Those that can afford to buy typically do. I assume that council houses are allocated to people that can't afford to buy, and find it difficult to rent privately.

(Original post by Paige26xx)
Also, why would someone with no education who may not of chose the college and uni life, get involved with crime?
It's a stereotype - I'm not arguing for it.

(Original post by Paige26xx)
Sorry if I seem like I’m coming across defensive
Don't be. Stereotypes can be hurtful.
1
reply
Paige26xx
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by RogerOxon)
To be clear, I judge people on their merits, not where they live. I was just explainging how I think some people see council estates.


Frankly, it's not an achievement to get into a university now - some are a bit of a joke. There are a lot of non-academic course, so it's not really the same intellectual level (on average) as a few decades ago, although I'm certainly not belittling useful trades.


Those that can afford to buy typically do. I assume that council houses are allocated to people that can't afford to buy, and find it difficult to rent privately.


It's a stereotype - I'm not arguing for it.


Don't be. Stereotypes can be hurtful.
You say you presume people live in council houses as they can’t afford to rent privately.. I find that interesting because there’s people in my family who can but choose not to as a “home is what you make it” and like I say, council houses in my family have been bought so therefor it’s a private house now 🙂 thank you for your opinion. I’m genuinely intrigued by it 😂
0
reply
RogerOxon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Paige26xx)
You say you presume people live in council houses as they can’t afford to rent privately.. I find that interesting because there’s people in my family who can but choose not to as a “home is what you make it”
My assumption was based on council housing being provided as a safety net, i.e. for people that can't afford the private option.
0
reply
londonmyst
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
A few reason's I've heard:

Aesthetic opinions that the high rise structures or most of the most notorious/largest council estates are unsightly or poorly maintained eyesores that ruin perceptions of the local area.
Name or sight of the estate buildings triggers very negative personal memories in those who were brought up/forced to temporarily move there.
Personal snobbery or disdain for the concept of state subsidised single household accommodation units for those unable to afford their own private housing.
Some individuals dislike all working people who choose to rent instead of buy.
Spiteful envy of those who manage to obtain subsidised council built properties on the part of those who could not.
Widespread social association of rented council provided accommodation with welfare funded unemployment/housing benefit/asylum claimants or those with criminal records and predatory tendencies.
2
reply
Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by RogerOxon)
I suspect two issues; stereotypes and the houses being considered ugly.

There is the assumption that the occupants don't place much value on education, as they haven't the income to live elsewhere. This may lead to their children not being interested in it, and falling into crime. There certainly are estates where this is the most visible pattern, but, as with any stereotype, it's a gross generalisation.

Even when the houses are privately owned, many don't like to buy them because they're considered ugly. On the flip-side, they're often much better houses (e.g. larger rooms) than privately built ones, as they weren't built to maximise profit.

The most important thing, IMO, is the people and how they interact with each other. Looking down on anyone for where they live is daft.
I agree
0
reply
Altvamp
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by Paige26xx)
I live in a council estate with my family, the house is theirs. It’s a lovely house. The neighbourhood is quite, no trouble, and all of the gardens and surrounding areas are well kept. I’ve heard bad things about council houses, especially if you rent, but why? Does it just depend on the house/estate? I mean I’ve seen some rough council estates. I’m not from a posh part of the U.K. but it’s not the worse, yet when I go to work in the posh part, some look down on me which I just can’t help but laugh at.
I think it depends on the area, but council house were generally for unemployed people with rent or partial rent paid by what was the DHSS, and they can be rough, I mean one estate round here was built specifically to house unemployed folk, there is rubbish everywhere, broken cycles, shopping trolleys, packs of dogs roaming and once saw a TV come flying out the living room window of one. Just a different class of people - low class.
0
reply
ch0c0h01ic
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by Paige26xx)
I live in a council estate with my family, the house is theirs. It’s a lovely house. The neighbourhood is quite, no trouble, and all of the gardens and surrounding areas are well kept. I’ve heard bad things about council houses, especially if you rent, but why? Does it just depend on the house/estate? I mean I’ve seen some rough council estates. I’m not from a posh part of the U.K. but it’s not the worse, yet when I go to work in the posh part, some look down on me which I just can’t help but laugh at.
It depends on a number of factors:
1. Stereotyping - most people in this day and age don't care where you live as long as you're a nice person and work hard. Sadly some people still do.
2. Demographic factors (eg; level of unemployment, poverty level, etc) - having large amounts of broke, bored people with nothing productive to do with their time isn't good for any community.
3. Proportion of privately owned properties - generally people that own their property tend to maintain it better and respect the surrounding area (the same can be said for privately owned properties). Without this you tend to see more signs of property damage, littering, vandalism, fly tipping, etc.
4. Council or housing association attitude to problem tenants - sadly some councils or housing associations do not deal with problem tenants appropriately and use some estates as dumping grounds.

Another issue with council housing is choice. With there being a limited supply you have relatively little choice where you're put, and equally who your neighbours may be, for better or for worse. With private renting, even buying, you have a little more control, not much and it could be expensive, but a little more.

It's a very crude measure, but you can tell a lot simply by the types of cars on the drive, how well the property and gardens are maintained, and the general state of the community (ie; cleanliness of the road, footpaths, shared areas and street furniture). This applies to any estate, but if you've got family cars and work vans on the drive, gardens and houses are well maintained, and the streets are pretty clean it means that a relatively high proportion of people are in work, there's a high proportion of home ownership and you're less likely to have issues (and vice versa).
0
reply
StriderHort
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
It's a very crude measure, but you can tell a lot simply by the types of cars on the drive, how well the property and gardens are maintained, and the general state of the community (ie; cleanliness of the road, footpaths, shared areas and street furniture). This applies to any estate, but if you've got family cars and work vans on the drive, gardens and houses are well maintained, and the streets are pretty clean it means that a relatively high proportion of people are in work, there's a high proportion of home ownership and you're less likely to have issues (and vice versa).
I'd agree with this. I'm a gardener by trade and any time we pull into a new street/estate we do this, we'll be able to guess v quick what homes are owned and what are rented by their condition and surroundings, because frankly we don't often want to waste our time chapping council rented properties as from exp, we're met with a range of "I don't give a **** about the garden', 'The garden is the ******* councils job!' or the classic 'the boy next door does it for £10!' (despite all evidence). We're also v aware that in many streets/estates we need to really watch our tools, leave nothing not under lock and key ect.

(I've worked for the councils and housing associations directly with their tenants as well, and Jesus H Christ the state of a lot of them
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by Paige26xx)
I live in a council estate with my family, the house is theirs. It’s a lovely house. The neighbourhood is quite, no trouble, and all of the gardens and surrounding areas are well kept. I’ve heard bad things about council houses, especially if you rent, but why? Does it just depend on the house/estate? I mean I’ve seen some rough council estates. I’m not from a posh part of the U.K. but it’s not the worse, yet when I go to work in the posh part, some look down on me which I just can’t help but laugh at.
They arent worth worrying about, so pay them no attention.
Some people are just snobs and seek to distinguish themselves from others by believing they are superior based on what they own or earn.
They are just snobs and it says more about them.
0
reply
alex282
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by Paige26xx)
I live in a council estate with my family, the house is theirs. It’s a lovely house. The neighbourhood is quite, no trouble, and all of the gardens and surrounding areas are well kept. I’ve heard bad things about council houses, especially if you rent, but why? Does it just depend on the house/estate? I mean I’ve seen some rough council estates. I’m not from a posh part of the U.K. but it’s not the worse, yet when I go to work in the posh part, some look down on me which I just can’t help but laugh at.
It's different all over the UK, you could be lucky and in a quiet one with newer houses or unlucky and in a rough one with loud neighbours and thin walls that play music and smoke all day
0
reply
pepsimaxcherry
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 weeks ago
#14
Simply because people are rude and horrible!

There’s nothing wrong with living in a rental or council house! The main reason people look down on them is simply because of stereotypes!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (176)
14.52%
I'm not sure (56)
4.62%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (355)
29.29%
I have already dropped out (35)
2.89%
I'm not a current university student (590)
48.68%

Watched Threads

View All