New survey says under 25's have 'given up dream job hope' due to pandemic worries

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StrawberryDreams
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-54329554

'More than one in three young people say they have lost hope of getting their dream job because of coronavirus, the Prince's Trust has said.
The charity said a survey of 2,000 people aged 16 to 25 across the UK showed 44% had lower aspirations for the future as a result of the pandemic.

According to the research, carried out by Censuswide, 41% of young people believe their future goals now seem "impossible to achieve", with this rising to 50% of those surveyed from poorer backgrounds.

More than a third of young people, 38%, feel they will "never succeed in life". This rises to 48% of those from poorer homes.'

How do you feel the pandemic has changed your opinion on your job prospects? Are you worried, or are you carrying on as planned?

Is there any support and advice we could offer here on TSR to support?

We have a great careers forum where you can ask any questions on applying for jobs or your dream career here.
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FingersXedAgain
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I am 36 and was a victim of the last recession where I felt like this. It’s not true but it can take a long time for things to improve. I lost a decade to be unemployed and underemployed. I ended up with some mental health issues.

Only advice I can give is not to blame yourself. It is not your fault. It’s not your lack of anything that caused this. It’s a pandemic and already oversupply of graduates.
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StrawberryDreams
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(Original post by FingersXedAgain)
I am 36 and was a victim of the last recession where I felt like this. It’s not true but it can take a long time for things to improve. I lost a decade to be unemployed and underemployed. I ended up with some mental health issues.

Only advice I can give is not to blame yourself. It is not your fault. It’s not your lack of anything that caused this. It’s a pandemic and already oversupply of graduates.
Love that advice, it's so important to remember it's not your fault and these are exceptional circumstances. Thank you for sharing your story :heart:
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Trinculo
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Well - it just goes to show.

There's someone else on this forum who wants another lockdown, because they can't cope with the job they already have.
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EU Yakov
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(Original post by StrawberryDreams)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-54329554

'More than one in three young people say they have lost hope of getting their dream job because of coronavirus, the Prince's Trust has said.
The charity said a survey of 2,000 people aged 16 to 25 across the UK showed 44% had lower aspirations for the future as a result of the pandemic.

According to the research, carried out by Censuswide, 41% of young people believe their future goals now seem "impossible to achieve", with this rising to 50% of those surveyed from poorer backgrounds.

More than a third of young people, 38%, feel they will "never succeed in life". This rises to 48% of those from poorer homes.'

How do you feel the pandemic has changed your opinion on your job prospects? Are you worried, or are you carrying on as planned?

Is there any support and advice we could offer here on TSR to support?

We have a great careers forum where you can ask any questions on applying for jobs or your dream career here.
no offence but these sort of kids seem like the ones who do **** all to make themselves employable during university

the lockdown and the dip in grad recruitment isn't a death sentence, it will at worst just delay one's entry into their preferred career by a year or two. all of this 'never succeed in life' and 'impossible to achieve' stuff is getting old. you're only going to get locked out of the market if you were in the bottom whatever percent of applicants to begin with
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Cubcub99
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(Original post by Trinculo)
Well - it just goes to show.

There's someone else on this forum who wants another lockdown, because they can't cope with the job they already have.
but surely this is anti lockdown post? It's saying young people's lives have already been impacted so shouldn't be made worse?
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Pathway
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These negative, all-or-nothing statements are not helpful. None of this is a death sentence. **** happens, people will get through it. We've gotten through things before.
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CoolCavy
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I cant speak for everyone but i think being flexible is important.
I did product design at uni and was initially wanting to go into the design side however due to the pandemic not many of those places are hiring. Right now the more industrial and manufacturing side offers the more abundant and stable employment. Although i did a BA both BSC and BA elements were taught and you were expected to have both in your work just weighted more towards your specialism.
Everyone does both in first year and then you choose either BA or BSC for the second which i think is a good way of doing it as i could talk about the arts side for graphics applications and the bsc side for the manufacturing applications.
I'm currently working in quality control for an aerospace and defence company, I graduated in July and started my job search in june.
There's no need to give up on your dream job, for me personally i intend to work my way up the company and into the design department. Starting at a lower level will actually aid my designs since i have hands on experience with the stuff i will be designing.
I am grateful i chose a course with good industry links and strong ties to how manufacturers operate. I had to produce and look at so many manufacturing drawings at uni which is a main part of my role now.
This is why a course that is applicable in the work place is more important than general 'prestige' (look at course rankings as opposed to general university reputation). I'm glad i did things my way and not caved to the pressure of my grammar school to go to somewhere very prestigious but also very theoretical. Obviously the two things arent always related but they definitely were with the BA side at least (for BSC entry courses most were more focussed towards pure engineering and had too much maths for my taste) the better known unis were designing space watches and doing lots of design and art theory which just isnt that useful for the here and now. Those are the unis that tend to come lower in the course rankings for design even if the uni as a whole is well rated.
Unfortunately the people i knew from school who are struggling to find work are the ones that did theoretical subjects that have no direct application outside of uni (both stem and non stem).
For current students be flexible in your aspirations and for future students pick your course carefully.
Nobody is guarenteed a job or a career but you can do things to increase your chances
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DarthRoar
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(Original post by EU Yakov)
the lockdown and the dip in grad recruitment isn't a death sentence, it will at worst just delay one's entry into their preferred career by a year or two. all of this 'never succeed in life' and 'impossible to achieve' stuff is getting old. you're only going to get locked out of the market if you were in the bottom whatever percent of applicants to begin with
If only this were true. In reality, the top graduate schemes will not want someone with an employment gap when they could recruit a fresh university student. Often, if you delay entry by a year or two, you simply aren't going to get in. Further, each year that intake numbers are reduced, more and more graduates that want the same jobs build up, increasing competition dramatically.
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andrewconway
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I graduated in 1990 (!) - into the teeth of a terrible recession. Even school friends who had been to Oxford were lucky if they managed to get a job in a book shop. No one was expecting this - when we were choosing a University they told us their graduates were being offered bonuses to join FTSE100 companies. Three years later it had all changed and jobs for graduates had dried up. I spent a year back at my parent's house in a small countryside town, getting panic attacks and trying to summon up the courage to make the occasional phone call to recruitment agents in London. I had no idea what I wanted to do.

In the end I went back to university to study a master's degree in a language I had been taking evening classes in. I got my confidence back, despite almost being thrown off the course for not handing in assignments on time. I used this to apply to recruitment agents who specialised in speakers of that language and managed to get a junior level job at a foreign company. Despite not being paid very well, and not being on a formal graduate programme (at 24 I was 'too old' for that) I learned a huge amount. I also rekindled an interest in IT that had only been a hobby at home. I used that to move to an entry level job at an IT consultancy two years later. My two years work experience gave me an edge over the new recruits and I managed to pick up useful experience while teaching myself coding from books. A year later and I managed to get a junior job in IT at an investment bank. For a long time it never felt easy and I was not paid anything like as much as some of my friends but once I had acquired enough experience my career got going.

By doing a good job for internal customers they recruited me to a new position when they found a better job elsewhere. From that point on I found myself doing a great job in a great company, in an industry I would never have thought about or known much about before.

The point is you can be successful but sometimes you have to go the long way round and keep working hard persistently. People will notice you deliver results and that counts for everything. And make sure you have some hobby or interest to keep you sane - it could be the very thing that gets you a job later. At the very least it will get you out of bed and talking to other people. I have been anxious and sometimes depressed many times in my life, and had several set backs but it DOES get better and there are good times ahead that you can never imagine.

My heart goes out to anyone struggling this year. Don't give up, don't take no for an answer, and if you can't get where you want to be directly then there will always be an indirect route to get there eventually. Good luck!
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
I cant speak for everyone but i think being flexible is important.
I did product design at uni and was initially wanting to go into the design side however due to the pandemic not many of those places are hiring. Right now the more industrial and manufacturing side offers the more abundant and stable employment. Although i did a BA both BSC and BA elements were taught and you were expected to have both in your work just weighted more towards your specialism.
Everyone does both in first year and then you choose either BA or BSC for the second which i think is a good way of doing it as i could talk about the arts side for graphics applications and the bsc side for the manufacturing applications.
I'm currently working in quality control for an aerospace and defence company, I graduated in July and started my job search in june.
There's no need to give up on your dream job, for me personally i intend to work my way up the company and into the design department. Starting at a lower level will actually aid my designs since i have hands on experience with the stuff i will be designing.
I am grateful i chose a course with good industry links and strong ties to how manufacturers operate. I had to produce and look at so many manufacturing drawings at uni which is a main part of my role now.
This is why a course that is applicable in the work place is more important than general 'prestige' (look at course rankings as opposed to general university reputation). I'm glad i did things my way and not caved to the pressure of my grammar school to go to somewhere very prestigious but also very theoretical. Obviously the two things arent always related but they definitely were with the BA side at least (for BSC entry courses most were more focussed towards pure engineering and had too much maths for my taste) the better known unis were designing space watches and doing lots of design and art theory which just isnt that useful for the here and now. Those are the unis that tend to come lower in the course rankings for design even if the uni as a whole is well rated.
Unfortunately the people i knew from school who are struggling to find work are the ones that did theoretical subjects that have no direct application outside of uni (both stem and non stem).
For current students be flexible in your aspirations and for future students pick your course carefully.
Nobody is guarenteed a job or a career but you can do things to increase your chances
This is such good advice, my sister is interested in product design at university level so I’ll pass your words of wisdom on, thank you :adore:
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excitedpresent
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I feel this to the core :-)

the idea of getting any job seems daunting atm though
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Afuru
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
I cant speak for everyone but i think being flexible is important.
I did product design at uni and was initially wanting to go into the design side however due to the pandemic not many of those places are hiring. Right now the more industrial and manufacturing side offers the more abundant and stable employment. Although i did a BA both BSC and BA elements were taught and you were expected to have both in your work just weighted more towards your specialism.
Everyone does both in first year and then you choose either BA or BSC for the second which i think is a good way of doing it as i could talk about the arts side for graphics applications and the bsc side for the manufacturing applications.
I'm currently working in quality control for an aerospace and defence company, I graduated in July and started my job search in june.
There's no need to give up on your dream job, for me personally i intend to work my way up the company and into the design department. Starting at a lower level will actually aid my designs since i have hands on experience with the stuff i will be designing.
I am grateful i chose a course with good industry links and strong ties to how manufacturers operate. I had to produce and look at so many manufacturing drawings at uni which is a main part of my role now.
This is why a course that is applicable in the work place is more important than general 'prestige' (look at course rankings as opposed to general university reputation). I'm glad i did things my way and not caved to the pressure of my grammar school to go to somewhere very prestigious but also very theoretical. Obviously the two things arent always related but they definitely were with the BA side at least (for BSC entry courses most were more focussed towards pure engineering and had too much maths for my taste) the better known unis were designing space watches and doing lots of design and art theory which just isnt that useful for the here and now. Those are the unis that tend to come lower in the course rankings for design even if the uni as a whole is well rated.
Unfortunately the people i knew from school who are struggling to find work are the ones that did theoretical subjects that have no direct application outside of uni (both stem and non stem).
For current students be flexible in your aspirations and for future students pick your course carefully.
Nobody is guarenteed a job or a career but you can do things to increase your chances
i'm happy for you, sadly i can't say the same for myself, i graduated from uni 2 years ago now, i did product design and i have struggled to find a design job that will take me, i've been working as a waitress for 2 years and I just wonder when is it going to happen for me? i've applied to countless places but few getting back and not making it through the interview stage because i don't have one required skill they want. At this point i feel hopeless and wonder if there's ever a way out of this job as i feel unhappy and feel like my skills and knowledge are not good enough, do you have any advice for someone who graduated in product design who has failed to find anything ? or this is a huge step in the dark, do you know anyone in the industry willing to hire.
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