Sha.xo527
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Background info: I've lived in Spain and know fluent Spanish.

I'll take Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and Biology. That'll be 4 A levels, but I'm thinking of doing Spanish too since that'll be almost like a 'free qualification' (I won't ever have to study for it). Not only that, but 5 A levels would look good (even though I'll only study for 4)

I heard that unis look at your A level grades, then the amount of A levels (key bit), etc.
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AscendingWings
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(Original post by Sha.xo527)
Background info: I've lived in Spain and know fluent Spanish.

I'll take Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and Biology. That'll be 4 A levels, but I'm thinking of doing Spanish too since that'll be almost like a 'free qualification' (I won't ever have to study for it). Not only that, but 5 A levels would look good (even though I'll only study for 4)

I heard that unis look at your A level grades, then the amount of A levels (key bit), etc.
Really I think you need to make the choice. You know how well you work better than anyone.
If you think you're capable of doing Spanish with no work I think you'll be surprised how much time it takes up despite being fluent in it. You're choosing some heavy subjects but I know plenty of people who have done that and done really well, it really depends on how you work and manage your time.

Also consider if Spanish is just a bonus, what more will it add to you other than an additional grade at A-Levels? Look at what you want to do at uni and make an educated decision to see whether or not it's really worthwhile. You may be able to sit the exam without the lessons too if you can show your competency, ask the college for their opinion on the matter.

I know you'll make the right decision!
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Pichi
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I'm in a similar position. I'm half Spanish and am planning to do it as a fifth A-Level potentially (I'm in Year 12 but haven't started yet, but I'm sadly not fluent- I'll have to learn it at home, but my mum is a teacher) but I'm telling you right now that it doesn't work like GCSE, meaning you can't just walk into the exam knowing how to speak, write and read in Spanish about your holidays or something. I also do A-Level French (and Spanish will work similarly at A-Level) which requires you to study a French text, French film, societal changes and structures, history (for Spanish, I believe it's on Franco's dictatorship), etc. I'm thinking of studying the play 'La Casa de Bernarda Alba' and maybe 'Volver' for the film. You'll need to know facts, statistics, dates, quotes (for the book and film), analyse the text and film (a bit like in English Literature, but not as in depth or advanced) and more. I'd recommend you look at the specification your school follows for Spanish and exam papers before making your mind up.

Though, if you've lived in Spain, you'll probably find the whole thing a lot easier. You'll be more familiar with politics, societal norms and the history, if you went to school in Spain. There's a lot of vocabulary for me to learn, as someone who wasn't raised to speak Spanish. If you're willing to spend time on the text and film then it'll be worth it, and I guess it adds a little variety to the fact that you do lots of STEM subjects.
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by AscendingWings)
Really I think you need to make the choice. You know how well you work better than anyone.
If you think you're capable of doing Spanish with no work I think you'll be surprised how much time it takes up despite being fluent in it. You're choosing some heavy subjects but I know plenty of people who have done that and done really well, it really depends on how you work and manage your time.

Also consider if Spanish is just a bonus, what more will it add to you other than an additional grade at A-Levels? Look at what you want to do at uni and make an educated decision to see whether or not it's really worthwhile. You may be able to sit the exam without the lessons too if you can show your competency, ask the college for their opinion on the matter.

I know you'll make the right decision!
I can quite well manage my time. It's really just a bonus but i read at an article once that unis look at the amount of A levels you took. I want to go into dentistry which is very competitive so as long as i have more chances of getting into a good uni the better

I've lived in Spain for 7 years and got to school there, was always at the top of my class, etc. so i'm pretty sure the language won't be a problem for me.

Thank you! I made my decision now. I'll take it
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by Pichi)
I'm in a similar position. I'm half Spanish and am planning to do it as a fifth A-Level potentially (I'm in Year 12 but haven't started yet, but I'm sadly not fluent- I'll have to learn it at home, but my mum is a teacher) but I'm telling you right now that it doesn't work like GCSE, meaning you can't just walk into the exam knowing how to speak, write and read in Spanish about your holidays or something. I also do A-Level French (and Spanish will work similarly at A-Level) which requires you to study a French text, French film, societal changes and structures, history (for Spanish, I believe it's on Franco's dictatorship), etc. I'm thinking of studying the play 'La Casa de Bernarda Alba' and maybe 'Volver' for the film. You'll need to know facts, statistics, dates, quotes (for the book and film), analyse the text and film (a bit like in English Literature, but not as in depth or advanced) and more. I'd recommend you look at the specification your school follows for Spanish and exam papers before making your mind up.

Though, if you've lived in Spain, you'll probably find the whole thing a lot easier. You'll be more familiar with politics, societal norms and the history, if you went to school in Spain. There's a lot of vocabulary for me to learn, as someone who wasn't raised to speak Spanish. If you're willing to spend time on the text and film then it'll be worth it, and I guess it adds a little variety to the fact that you do lots of STEM subjects.
woah.... this just put everything into perspective. I mean I'm fluent but i don't wanna bother remembering plays, quotes, etc. when i have 4 other content heavy subjects.....
Thank you so much!!! I won't take it now. This really hit me with the reality of things
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AscendingWings
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(Original post by Sha.xo527)
I can quite well manage my time. It's really just a bonus but i read at an article once that unis look at the amount of A levels you took. I want to go into dentistry which is very competitive so as long as i have more chances of getting into a good uni the better

I've lived in Spain for 7 years and got to school there, was always at the top of my class, etc. so i'm pretty sure the language won't be a problem for me.

Thank you! I made my decision now. I'll take it
Best of luck with it!
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by Pichi)
I'm in a similar position. I'm half Spanish and am planning to do it as a fifth A-Level potentially (I'm in Year 12 but haven't started yet, but I'm sadly not fluent- I'll have to learn it at home, but my mum is a teacher) but I'm telling you right now that it doesn't work like GCSE, meaning you can't just walk into the exam knowing how to speak, write and read in Spanish about your holidays or something. I also do A-Level French (and Spanish will work similarly at A-Level) which requires you to study a French text, French film, societal changes and structures, history (for Spanish, I believe it's on Franco's dictatorship), etc. I'm thinking of studying the play 'La Casa de Bernarda Alba' and maybe 'Volver' for the film. You'll need to know facts, statistics, dates, quotes (for the book and film), analyse the text and film (a bit like in English Literature, but not as in depth or advanced) and more. I'd recommend you look at the specification your school follows for Spanish and exam papers before making your mind up.

Though, if you've lived in Spain, you'll probably find the whole thing a lot easier. You'll be more familiar with politics, societal norms and the history, if you went to school in Spain. There's a lot of vocabulary for me to learn, as someone who wasn't raised to speak Spanish. If you're willing to spend time on the text and film then it'll be worth it, and I guess it adds a little variety to the fact that you do lots of STEM subjects.
(Original post by AscendingWings)
Best of luck with it!
Thank you
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Pichi
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(Original post by Sha.xo527)
woah.... this just put everything into perspective. I mean I'm fluent but i don't wanna bother remembering plays, quotes, etc. when i have 4 other content heavy subjects.....
Thank you so much!!! I won't take it now. This really hit me with the reality of things
Haha, I also do English Literature, Biology and Chemistry...
I'm thinking I'll study Spanish but not do the exam so I don't lose what I've learned at GCSE and improve (and so my family in Spain can stop teasing me for not speaking much Spanish).

If you've lived in Spain for seven years, can I ask for some recommendations of TV shows actually? Or books? Anything really. I'd love to know more about life there.
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H4ttie03
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Honestly I wouldnt recommend taking it as a 5th as even tho you're fluent, you will have to study a book, a film and be able to analyse these etc. You'll also also have to learn about spanish history an cultural topics etc. I currently do 3 a levels, spanish being one of them and honestly couldnt imagine taking on a 4th, let alone a 5th but do what you feel would be best
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AnaClarkson
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I didn't do Spanish at A-level, but I did French. Language exams aren't easy, even if you're a native speaker. You need to learn presentation skills, how to write essays and explain your points, analyse texts and explain societal trends. You cannot just get by because you know the language at a native or near native level. All you need to get into university is three good A-levels. At my sixth form, they recommended only taking three or else you'd spread yourself too thin. This was true. If you're thinking about using it at university level, drop one of the others, otherwise it's just more work and time you need to devote to your other A-levels. I don't recommend it, but it's your choice to make.
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by Pichi)
Haha, I also do English Literature, Biology and Chemistry...
I'm thinking I'll study Spanish but not do the exam so I don't lose what I've learned at GCSE and improve (and so my family in Spain can stop teasing me for not speaking much Spanish).

If you've lived in Spain for seven years, can I ask for some recommendations of TV shows actually? Or books? Anything really. I'd love to know more about life there.
1) Oh I'm sure you'll improve! And sameee my family teases me for not speaking my original language too (Bengali)


2)
I LOVED Doraemon which is originally a japanese cartoon. It's to do with this 'dumb' 10 year old that originally is a failure in life and will be forever. His grandchild (in the future, 22nd century) seeks help to his babysitter robot. The robot (Doraemon) goes to the past (21st century) to make Nobita not a 'loser' anymore- tries to make sure he's not always late to school gets good grades, defends himself when bullied, helps him get his crush, etc. Spoiler Alert: Doraemon succeeded, plus Nobita married his crush when he grew up. Strangely though, the grandchild still was born. Anyways, there's more to it but this is just a summary. As well as the cartoons there are also several films about Doraemon (not real life films though, still animated)

There's also Shin Chan, again, originally a japanese cartoon. Also has films, but not real life ones (animated still). Every episode is different, i don't think it's an actual series but just hundreds of different episodes. It's to do with this odd and funny 5 year old that likes older girls and..... ok this sounds weird. You'll understand if you see.


Plus, i adored Sandra, Detective de cuentos. This is an originally spanish based cartoon i believe. Sandra is a little girl who is the descendant from a long line of fairytale detectives. Sandra is a little girl but when her assistant and friend Fo, a 500-year-old elf, arrives to say that there's a problem over in The Land of Once Upon a Time, she gets into action.

All the other cartoons and tv shows i liked are in the UK too so i don't think i need to mention.

3)
In primary schools, girls are (mostly) all friends with each other and play with each other. Boys in the other hand are split into friend groups. This changes in secondary, everyone has different friend groups. The social life/gossip/drama is basically exactly the same as England.

On tests, they only ask you 10 questions. Lucky them.

However, on secondary school, they give you A LOTTTT OF WORK. You really don't learn actually, just memorise. You have to study your b*tt off. Not sure how many questions they ask on tests though, it's either 20 or still 10.

4)
There's quite a bit of racism. I'm really pale now because, hey, England. Though back then, i was tan.

This MIDDLE AGED MAN literally pointed at me and called me 'n*gga' once. By the way, I'm not even black. And i only looked a bit tan. What's wrong with people.
Some racist classmates called me 'chocolate'. I know, i know.. THEY LITERALLY CALLED ME A SNACK But they meant it in a racist way. This other kid called me Pocahontas. I know, he basically called me a princess. But he meant it in a racist way. (I'm bengali btw). Furthermore, another person (also racist) said i won't ever get a boyfriend because I'm tan. Guess what? I've *got 8 exes and a boyfriend right now *. Sucks to suck.

Also, spanish people don't care whether e.g. you're indonesian, japanese, etc. They'll consider you chinese and won't care about what you say, full stop.
Similarly, they don't care whether you're e.g. pakistani, bengali, etc. They'll consider you indian and won't care about what you say, full stop.

5)
I read books in Spain but i forgot their titles. They were just like any other book here, to be honest.

6) I don't know much about politics, mainly because i never cared for it

7) My family was quite well off but i noticed that in Spain, people in general have less money than here.


8) Moreover, things were just 'bigger'. Things weren't separated by roads as much as in England. Google 'plazas' and you'll see what i mean.


P.S. What i said is through my own experience and other people's. E.g. the primary school bit is only based on my school. The secondary school bit is only based on what my Spanish best friend who i still talk with says xx
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by H4ttie03)
Honestly I wouldnt recommend taking it as a 5th as even tho you're fluent, you will have to study a book, a film and be able to analyse these etc. You'll also also have to learn about spanish history an cultural topics etc. I currently do 3 a levels, spanish being one of them and honestly couldnt imagine taking on a 4th, let alone a 5th but do what you feel would be best
Yeah, i agree. Cheers
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apolaroidofus
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Honestly I don't see the point - if you're fluent, it's way more impressive to say 'I am fluent in Spanish' than it is to say 'I have an A* in A-level Spanish'. It's also unfair on students who are learning it as a second or even third language, because it pulls up the grade boundaries!
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by apolaroidofus)
Honestly I don't see the point - if you're fluent, it's way more impressive to say 'I am fluent in Spanish' than it is to say 'I have an A* in A-level Spanish'. It's also unfair on students who are learning it as a second or even third language, because it pulls up the grade boundaries!
ohhhhhh yes, i haven't thought about that. I won't take it
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by AnaClarkson)
I didn't do Spanish at A-level, but I did French. Language exams aren't easy, even if you're a native speaker. You need to learn presentation skills, how to write essays and explain your points, analyse texts and explain societal trends. You cannot just get by because you know the language at a native or near native level. All you need to get into university is three good A-levels. At my sixth form, they recommended only taking three or else you'd spread yourself too thin. This was true. If you're thinking about using it at university level, drop one of the others, otherwise it's just more work and time you need to devote to your other A-levels. I don't recommend it, but it's your choice to make.
Yeah, maybe I'm being too ambitious with 4. Most likely i won't do further Maths then (and definitely not the language A level at all)
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apolaroidofus
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(Original post by Sha.xo527)
Yeah, maybe I'm being too ambitious with 4. Most likely i won't do further Maths then (and definitely not the language A level at all)
If you achieved highly at GCSE and are good at maths, further maths is more manageable as a fourth than a whole other subject and quite a lot of people take it as a fourth. It's up to you to decide if you think you can handle it but lots of people do this every year!
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username5386340
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I do spanish a level exam board eduqas. I have to study las bicicletas son para el verano and watch el laberinto del fauno. There's two essay questions in a 2 hr exam for the book and film. You have to know the book and film quite well. Then there's a speaking component and you get to do a mini presentation which you memorise. After the presentation you have a conversation about various topics . The last component is reading and writing but this part literally tests your ability to understand the language and translate. So yeah you have to know a book and a film, but the test is mostly communication and written skills. If you're fluent I'd say go for it 😊
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Pichi
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(Original post by Sha.xo527)
1) Oh I'm sure you'll improve! And sameee my family teases me for not speaking my original language too (Bengali)


2)
I LOVED Doraemon which is originally a japanese cartoon. It's to do with this 'dumb' 10 year old that originally is a failure in life and will be forever. His grandchild (in the future, 22nd century) seeks help to his babysitter robot. The robot (Doraemon) goes to the past (21st century) to make Nobita not a 'loser' anymore- tries to make sure he's not always late to school gets good grades, defends himself when bullied, helps him get his crush, etc. Spoiler Alert: Doraemon succeeded, plus Nobita married his crush when he grew up. Strangely though, the grandchild still was born. Anyways, there's more to it but this is just a summary. As well as the cartoons there are also several films about Doraemon (not real life films though, still animated)

There's also Shin Chan, again, originally a japanese cartoon. Also has films, but not real life ones (animated still). Every episode is different, i don't think it's an actual series but just hundreds of different episodes. It's to do with this odd and funny 5 year old that likes older girls and..... ok this sounds weird. You'll understand if you see.


Plus, i adored Sandra, Detective de cuentos. This is an originally spanish based cartoon i believe. Sandra is a little girl who is the descendant from a long line of fairytale detectives. Sandra is a little girl but when her assistant and friend Fo, a 500-year-old elf, arrives to say that there's a problem over in The Land of Once Upon a Time, she gets into action.

All the other cartoons and tv shows i liked are in the UK too so i don't think i need to mention.

3)
In primary schools, girls are (mostly) all friends with each other and play with each other. Boys in the other hand are split into friend groups. This changes in secondary, everyone has different friend groups. The social life/gossip/drama is basically exactly the same as England.

On tests, they only ask you 10 questions. Lucky them.

However, on secondary school, they give you A LOTTTT OF WORK. You really don't learn actually, just memorise. You have to study your b*tt off. Not sure how many questions they ask on tests though, it's either 20 or still 10.

4)
There's quite a bit of racism. I'm really pale now because, hey, England. Though back then, i was tan.

This MIDDLE AGED MAN literally pointed at me and called me 'n*gga' once. By the way, I'm not even black. And i only looked a bit tan. What's wrong with people.
Some racist classmates called me 'chocolate'. I know, i know.. THEY LITERALLY CALLED ME A SNACK But they meant it in a racist way. This other kid called me Pocahontas. I know, he basically called me a princess. But he meant it in a racist way. (I'm bengali btw). Furthermore, another person (also racist) said i won't ever get a boyfriend because I'm tan. Guess what? I've *got 8 exes and a boyfriend right now *. Sucks to suck.

Also, spanish people don't care whether e.g. you're indonesian, japanese, etc. They'll consider you chinese and won't care about what you say, full stop.
Similarly, they don't care whether you're e.g. pakistani, bengali, etc. They'll consider you indian and won't care about what you say, full stop.

5)
I read books in Spain but i forgot their titles. They were just like any other book here, to be honest.

6) I don't know much about politics, mainly because i never cared for it

7) My family was quite well off but i noticed that in Spain, people in general have less money than here.


8) Moreover, things were just 'bigger'. Things weren't separated by roads as much as in England. Google 'plazas' and you'll see what i mean.


P.S. What i said is through my own experience and other people's. E.g. the primary school bit is only based on my school. The secondary school bit is only based on what my Spanish best friend who i still talk with says xx
Wow, that's a lot more information than I expected, but it really is helpful, so thank you, especially on school life (it's one of the A-Level topics) and on the show recommendations (I like anime, so that's a plus, and I remember seeing a lot of Doraemon on TV when visiting, but not the others you mentioned). It is still a predominantly white country, though, so I'm not too surprised on the racism, but it seems to be getting better (I am also half-Asian- at least, I consider myself to have South-Asian roots on my dad's side- and I haven't ever experienced racism while visiting, which I guess is lucky for me as my image of such a beautiful country hasn't been tainted).

Oh, also, it's a good thing you still talk to your friends there. Try your best not to lose your fluency in the language, as it can come in really handy for the future. Best of luck with your A-Levels
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